Any actuaries out there?

lessthanpilessthanpi Registered User regular
Hey, bit of background. I've got Master's Degrees in Economics and Mathematics and I've been teaching Math at the remedial university and community college level for about 10 years.

I'm about read to get the hell out of education and actuarial science seems like the best aligned with my interests and education.

I'm currently working my way through the Exam P materials and not having much difficulty. I'm planning on taking it mid-spring and then the FM later summer/early fall.

I'm curious about the level of difficulty and study required for the remaining exams and what kind of software knowledge I'd need to get hired in the field.

Any tips on which of the various incredibly expensive recommended books are worth the cost and effort? Anything else I need to know?

Posts

  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Go start interviewing now - most companies will pay for you to study and take the tests. Software-wise - learn R and other statistical packages, but most companies will have their own environments with their own quirks.
    Most of the actuaries I've met are pretty happy and have a good work/life balance. I work for a F100 Multi-line insurer. You just have to really love math, statistics and data.

    Inquisitor77
  • lessthanpilessthanpi Registered User regular
    I was pretty capable with STATA and SPSS, but that was close to 15 years ago. Are those around much? How about SQL?

  • lessthanpilessthanpi Registered User regular
    And as for "paid to study and take the tests" my current position is pretty much doing that. I've got tons of downtime to study between classes and I can pay the fees and buy books with professional development grant money. I'm looking to get at least P and FM and the VEE done before I decide if it's time to dive in permanently.

  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    lessthanpi wrote: »
    I was pretty capable with STATA and SPSS, but that was close to 15 years ago. Are those around much? How about SQL?

    SQL definitely, but R, Python, Hadoop & it's variants is where it's mostly at. SAS too, but it's honestly less relevant every year.

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