Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

New York for two days -- what to do, where to stay?

djmitchelladjmitchella regularRegistered User regular
I'm taking my wife to New York for her birthday at the start of December; thus far I have flights booked, and that's it. We arrive at Newark just after 3pm on Friday 2nd, and leave at 4pm on Sunday 4th (from Calgary, so it's a fair amount of flight but not jet-lag's worth). That much, at least, is sorted out.

Next question: what should we see, and where should we stay? I know basically nothing about the geography of New York beyond what I've sort of vaguely got from movies / TV / bikesnobnyc, none of which is very concrete. I know Manhattan's where all the big buildings are, and I guess(?) the sights, but I also know that there are an awful lot of sights to see; how practical is public transport for getting around? Google maps thinks it's an hour from the airport to the Statue of Liberty which gives me a rough starting point, but I'm still pretty fuzzy on the details, and if it's even worth taking the subway -vs- walking, like I'd do in London.

What things are must-sees, given that fairly limited time? There's a lot of museums, there's Broadway for shows, there's going to the different boroughs to see what's there; there's just walking around, we both like to walk places, so would it make more sense to try and see things on foot to save transit complications; you can see a lot of the big name stuff in London on foot, but I don't know if there's an equivalent sort of thing in New York,

And is it worth trying to stay somewhere central or is that just going to be ludicrously expensive? (checking, we'd get _bunk beds_ at the YMCA by Central Park for $goodgrief) Would it be better to stay a bit further out and take transit in the morning to wherever-it-is?

This is a pretty fuzzy set of questions, but beyond "okay, so we're going to New York" I don't have much worked out, and it feels like there's some real-world knowledge about how to get around in New York that I'm completely lacking which would help to narrow things down a bit.

Posts

  • silence1186silence1186 Character shields down! As a wingmanRegistered User regular
    Just a note, to get from Newark to the Statue of Liberty involves going through a tunnel, to Manhattan, then getting a boat from the southern tip to a separate, smaller island. So the actual trip to Manhattan is much easier.

    As someone who lives in New York, I can't really help you with hotels. Most of the nice, centrally located ones will cost $Texas though. You might want to look for a smaller hotel, like a Best Western. Hit up Hotels.com or similar travel website.

    Public transportation is easy and awesome in NYC. Subways are reliable and go to 95% of places in the city, and run non-stop (though less frequently over night). There are buses to fill the gaps subways can't. You can rent bikes from stations all around Manhattan if that's your thing, just be SUPER careful, since drivers pay very little heed to bicycles. There's also Yellow Cabs/Uber, if you don't mind paying a bit more to get around.

    Partly included in "how to get around," and partly in "things to do," are the bus tours that allow you to get on and off from various locations around the city. They're a standard tour bus, but if you want to get off and look at a location, there are other locations to get picked up by a bus from the same company.

    As a final note on transportation, the city is totally walkable. I did 10 miles with my cousins when they came to visit, no problems.

    Things are in general pretty expensive, but you have to be aware of things that are a bit more expensive, because it's the city, and things that are out and out gouging, because tourists don't know better. The electronics/gifts stores in Times Square are excessive in this regard. You just have to know you prices, but a lot of the time you'll be stuck just paying more anyway.

    As far as things to do, there's probably more than you can do in one trip, but definitely see the major museums, and see a Broadway show if you have time, they're really fantastic. There's lots of historical sites, especially downtown in the old city (below Wall Street). There's a combination Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island tour that can take up a lot of a day. Most of the things to do are in Manhattan. The other boroughs are mostly residential, and EXCEEDINGLY difficult to get to and around compared to Manhattan.

    Another important note: the food. There's multiple good restaurants for every type of cuisine, every possibles fusion of two (or more) cuisines, and a bunch of other extremely fun and clever restaurants. This will depend on your tastes a lot, but there are so many good places to eat. The only things I will recommend are getting real New York Bagels with cream cheese from an authentic deli/bagel store (you can tell the place is good if they have a lot of specialty Jewish food, like smoked Lox), and authentic New York Pizza. There's a bunch of good places, but if you want a sit down restaurant, John's Pizza in Times Square is great (but tends to attract tourists).

    Feel free to @ me if you have more questions.

    V wrote:
    Words will always retain their power. Words offer the means to meaning, and for those who will listen, the enunciation of truth.

  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    The subway is great for getting around.

    You should be able to see the Christmas tree at Rockafeller Plaza. Thr plaza itself is great and the view from Top of the Rock is awesome. Me and the wife did the art tour, and it was pretty interesting. Tons of ironic communist symbology.

    Statue of Liberty can be viewed for free from the Staten Island ferry. It goes right past it. I hear the Ellis Island trip can take up half the day so you might just want to do that.

    And I won, so you lose,
    Guess it always comes down to.
  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger regular Registered User regular
    How practical is public transport? Well, let's just say that driving a car in Manhattan is only for the insane. Gridlock is constant. Other drivers are maniacs. Parking is expensive or hard to find. Public transportation is the *only* practical method of getting around.

    The best way of getting around within Manhattan is subway trains or walking. Buses are slow as molasses. Citibike hire is fun if you aren't easily rattled.

    Walking is a lot of fun, but avoid Times Square which is full of tourist traps and various rogues trying to separate you from your money. Just go there for a show if you want to see a show, don't bother exploring or eating there.

    Central Park is great to wander in. The West and East Villages are lovely for urban walks and packed with great places to eat.

    Staying somewhere other than Manhattan can be good but make sure you have a subway station nearby that will take you to the city in under an hour.

    AuralynxLanlaorn
  • mtsmts regular Registered User regular
    You can get the ferry from liberty state Park I believe which is exit 14 off the turnpike and like ten minutes from ewr

    camo_sig.png
  • hsuhsu regular Registered User regular
    edited October 2016
    Stay somewhere in Manhattan, anywhere from around Columbia University to Wall Street. With only 2 days at your disposal, you really want to be within walking distance or short subway ride to as much of the major attractions as possible, and that's only really possible in Manhattan.

    If you had more time, or were planning a second trip, no big deal to be a little further away, like Brooklyn Heights or Long Island City or Harlem, but being that extra distance away will result in seeing a couple sights less per day, which is fine when you have plenty of time at your disposal, but isn't conductive to just a 2 day stay.

    hsu on
    iTNdmYl.png
  • AkilaeAkilae regular Registered User regular
    Brooklyn Heights is easily tacked onto the end of a day. Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge and down to DUMBO, go to Juliana's for a pizza dinner.

    But yes, stay in Manhattan. It's the best use of your time. The only other location I would recommend is the Marriott in Downtown Brooklyn, since it's right by the Borough Hall transit hub.

  • djmitchelladjmitchella regular Registered User regular
    Thanks for all the tips, everyone! It feels like given the schedule we're on, I should just bite the bullet and stay in Manhattan, which is exactly the sort of narrowing things down I was looking for, so thanks again!

  • Casual EddyCasual Eddy Don't despair. Not even over the fact that you don't despair.Registered User regular
    2nd seeing the tree in rockefeller - christmas is a big deal in nyc and that's a great place to experience it. I also love hanging out and watching the ice skaters, it's free and you don't actually have to wait in line for skating!

    a lot of the fancy stores on 5th avenue set up christmas window displays, and the last time I saw them they were pretty dang cool.

    I would definitely see times square - it's iconic and an incredible place to people watch. I agree that it's not worth eating or buying anything there, though.

    Grand central terminal is one of my favorite places in the city. it's absolutely gorgeous and well worth a stop. It's very busy during rush hour (morning and evening) but is calm otherwise. They usually have a cool holiday market there starting in december.

    my general tip for visitors is that new yorkers tend to do everything late - if you want to go to a hip brunch spot, awesome cocktail bar/speakeasy, etc - make sure to show up unfashionably early and you'll likely have the place to yourself. my favorite cocktail bar opens at 5 and if you show up at 5 you get in right away. If you show up at 6, there's a 1-2 hour wait.

    Elki wrote: »

    Casual Eddy: best poster 2014.
    tyrannus wrote: »
    Casual Eddy: best poster of 2015

    gotta update that stuff man
    CelestialBadgerAkilae
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia regular Registered User regular
    One thing I'd recommend is AirBnB. You can get a nice studio in Manhattan all to yourselves for half the price or less that a hotel in the same area would cost.

    As for things to see, I'd recommend Little Italy/Chinatown, they make for some great walking around, plus some phenomenal food.

  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited October 2016
    dont know what your price range is but Hampton Inn United Nations is extremely conveniently located and its affordable (under 150 per night)

    its barely a block from grand central terminal (subway!), and a simple stroll to Times Square

    from there you can go over to 5th or 6th avenue and head north pass Rockefeller Plaza on the way, and a couple of other cool landmarks, and you end up at central park

    I also enjoyed taking the subway down to the brooklyn bridge, and then from there strolling around lower manhattan, going down to the stock exchange, etc


    anecdotally, I was really underwhelmed by Times Square/Broadway. It's insanely touristy (although I was there during Fleet Week, so... maybe that contributed)

    Jasconius on
    JebusUD
  • moonwaltz7moonwaltz7 regular Registered User regular
    I used to live in New York and when I needed a cheap place to stay before and after, I used to stay at the Whitehouse on Bowery which was a super cheap hostel. They appear to be closed, but when I was looking for their website I found this place which looks affordable. The location is convenient to a bunch of stuff and subway lines too. http://www.theboweryhouse.com/

    Two days is a little time to pack in. If you are into spending time at museums, some of the big names may be worth it:

    MoMA has some really amazing art, Starry Night, early Picasso, Duchamp. It requires you to pay though.

    The Met is 'donation' recommended so if you are comfortable being awkward it can be free. Has a wide variety of stuff and some pretty amazing Egypt and Medieval type stuff.

    My favorite was always the Met's cloister satellite, which is way uptown. http://www.metmuseum.org/visit/met-cloisters

    Also, if you are into living history type stuff- the tenament museum is amazing. http://www.tenement.org/

    With transit, you can probably just get a multiday subway pass and go nuts. This seems to be the free option for planning transit now: https://citymapper.com/dc

    CelestialBadger
  • Karrde1842Karrde1842 regular Registered User regular
    My Dad and I just did a trip to NYC. We stayed at the Holland Hotel in Jersey. It's right outside the Holland Tunnel, and about a 10 minute walk to the Path train that takes you to the World Trade Center. From there you can do the subway or uber to anywhere. We did the Statue of Liberty and the Air and Space museum (at the air raft carrier Interpid. They've got the apace shuttle Enterprise there as well) in one day, with enough time to walk through Central Park a bit before dinner. Another day we just walked around a lot. All around Times Square, little Italy, etc. Also the WTC museum, which is both sobering and pretty heavy. Dad had to leave halfway through.

  • djmitchelladjmitchella regular Registered User regular
    Further updates: hotels were either $waytoomuch or super-sketchy-sounding, so I've booked an airbnb over by John Jay Park, which is pretty good for the Guggenheim/Moma/Met.museum, and should set us up for a sensible day's worth of walking towards the south, seeing things on the way (with any luck).

    Next: tickets to Hamiltonhahahahaha.

  • HandgimpHandgimp R+L=J Family PhotoRegistered User regular
    edited October 2016
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    One thing I'd recommend is AirBnB. You can get a nice studio in Manhattan all to yourselves for half the price or less that a hotel in the same area would cost.

    As for things to see, I'd recommend Little Italy/Chinatown, they make for some great walking around, plus some phenomenal food.

    Make sure to read up on this, I vaguely remember reading that NYC is about to crack down on airbnb based on it violating a subletting law they just passed? Basically politicians wanting to get their cut of a new market.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/new-airbnb-law-causes-stir-in-nyc-1477267960

    Handgimp on
    PwH4Ipj.jpg
  • daveNYCdaveNYC Why universe hate Waspinator? Registered User regular
    That's a ways east. Good for the Met and Goog, less so for the MoMa. That's fine though. You're time limited and the Met is the bomb unless you really want to see something specific to the MoMa.

    I wouldn't necessarily suggest walking south from the UES. It's not the most exciting hood (nor is the UWS where I lived) and its not a short walk to head south to the more interesting areas. YMMV regarding 'short' and 'interesting' of course. I'd maybe suggest hitting the Met, then taking the subway to 23rd, heading west to Eatily/Shake Shack, and then south on Broadway to Union Square. On Saturdays there is a farmers market in Union Square, but no way you'll get to that and hit the Met in the same day.

    Um, you want food suggestions? Because there is a crapton of stuff to do that can't be covered in two days, but there might be some consensus available on restaurants for specific cuisines.

    And you should go to Katz's deli regardless of what anyone else says. The best death is nitrate poisoning from pastrami.

    Shut up, Mr. Burton! You were not brought upon this world to get it!
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe regular Registered User regular
    Handgimp wrote: »
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    One thing I'd recommend is AirBnB. You can get a nice studio in Manhattan all to yourselves for half the price or less that a hotel in the same area would cost.

    As for things to see, I'd recommend Little Italy/Chinatown, they make for some great walking around, plus some phenomenal food.

    Make sure to read up on this, I vaguely remember reading that NYC is about to crack down on airbnb based on it violating a subletting law they just passed? Basically politicians wanting to get their cut of a new market.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/new-airbnb-law-causes-stir-in-nyc-1477267960

    I legitimately stayed with a friend at his apartment in Manhattan. The apartment complex grilled anyone coming in with luggage; required your driver's license; questioned you for about 10 minutes before letting anyone in. They were doing everything they could to keep AirBnBers out.

    What is this I don't even.
  • djmitchelladjmitchella regular Registered User regular
    As far as I can tell, the new rules for Airbnb are "the person whose place you're staying at must also be there", which seems like it's going to be the case given we're staying in someone's spare bedroom.

    daveNYC - thanks, I think we're almost certainly going to end up pushed for time to see the museums, but we like walking for the sake of walking, too, so I guess we'll have to see how we're doing for time. Food recommendations would be great, I'm not keen on spending any time slogging through yelp if we can avoid it -- as far as "types of cuisine" goes, anything that's distinctive to new york, I suppose, so delis/pizza/whatever the cliche'd "new york food" is, we're there to be tourists..

  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger regular Registered User regular
    There are so many restaurants in Manhattan that recommendations are impossible unless you are looking for something very specific. You could ask your AirBnB host where the good local pizza and delis are.

    New York is big on lunch specials, so you can save a lot of money eating lunch at a nice place and then a slice of cheap pizza for dinner :)

    Jasconius
  • chromdomchromdom Why do bad things keep happening to me? Oh yeah, because of the things I've done.Registered User regular
    You're leaving from Calgary? As in Alberta, Canada? I'd say that shoots down your whole Sunday. Flight time + getting through US Customs + normal airport stuff, and I tend to think Sunday is shot.
    Which means you have Friday night and Saturday, which is not a whole lot of time. Stay centrally located, and get as much done as your wife (since its her birthday) is comfortable with).

    Or is there another Calgary I am not thinking of?

  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe regular Registered User regular
    My favorite thing in NYC that I might not have stumbled upon as easily was Cafe Wha?

    What is this I don't even.
  • djmitchelladjmitchella regular Registered User regular
    chromdom wrote: »
    You're leaving from Calgary? As in Alberta, Canada? I'd say that shoots down your whole Sunday. Flight time + getting through US Customs + normal airport stuff, and I tend to think Sunday is shot.

    That's the right Calgary; flight leaves at 4pm, though, so I'm hoping we'll have a workable amount of morning available that day, even allowing a few hours for getting to/through the airport.

  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger regular Registered User regular
    You'll need to set out at 1pm that day so you've probably got time for a morning walk and a leisurely brunch. Brunch is big in NYC. Go to a trendy spot and drink mimosas. The West Village is big on trendy brunches, though the popular ones have waits unless you are Kanye.

  • djmitchelladjmitchella regular Registered User regular
    So, we went, we walked around a lot, we came back.. We:

    ate pizza
    aiy8Z7B.jpg
    (and a giant pretzel and street-cart hotdogs and a bagel + lox and ludicrously large donuts)

    went past the Guggenheim (and the Met), but resisted the urge to go into them:
    5w4HZlW.jpg

    saw the big Xmas tree:
    WD4OVLl.jpg

    went to MoMA and did actually go into there:
    zizlAOb.jpg

    didn't eat lunch at Katz's Deli because the line was insane and we'd already had lunch once that day:
    VuERjqo.jpg

    made it to be able to see the Statue of Liberty, though we didn't have time to get onto the water by then:
    zxzquHe.jpg

    found out that Times Square isn't actually a square the same way that, say, Leicester Square is, which was very unexpected:
    cLlWjax.jpg

    Saw A Show (thanks, Stubhub! I'd never used it before but it was super easy, it turns out)
    tGHKQPm.jpg

    walked through Central Park:
    Q7i0noJ.jpg

    went past Trump Tower to see what all the fuss was (actually not too bad; the police were there, and very politely asked us to keep the sidewalk clear after we'd taken enough photos, but beyond basic keeping it from getting too jammed-up, it was fine)
    dNQS5KI.jpg

    went to Grand Central Station
    q6FWK2q.jpg

    saw the Empire State Building:
    SBSkLln.jpg


    The WTC memorial pools were surprisingly effective, and look like nothing much in photos; we went past those on the way up from Battery Park to see what was there, and 'in the flesh' they are very very impressive as things both as far as how they've made them, and how well they work as a monument.

    Food recommendation, in case anyone is reading this thread in future: Superiority Burger where I had not only the best vegetarian burger I've ever had, I'd say I had the best burger of _any_ kind I've ever had. Lucky Peach has more on them. Pizza was at a local restaurant a few blocks from where we stayed, which was cheerful and energetic and had a mixture of families with kids running around and very elderly men eating very slowly, which was pretty much exactly what we wanted at that point on that day.

    The streets / subway were busy but manageable (I used to live in the UK so have had practise at that sort of thing on Oxford St, so Park Lane / 5th Ave were familiar feeling) -- what did surprise me was how busy Canal Street was when we were there, given that there wasn't anything obviously _on_ there except for a lot of discount jewelry shops)

    firewaterwordKetarsilence1186CauldCelestialBadgerscherbchenchromdomHakkekageIrukaElvenshaefightinfilipinodaveNYC
  • silence1186silence1186 Character shields down! As a wingmanRegistered User regular
    I saw that show too! I hope you liked it.

    V wrote:
    Words will always retain their power. Words offer the means to meaning, and for those who will listen, the enunciation of truth.

    djmitchella
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    damn, Nathan Lane John Slattery AND John Goodman? jackpot

    djmitchellaKetarElvenshae
  • KetarKetar Ready to feel better about your own miserable lives?Registered User regular
    Jasconius wrote: »
    damn, Nathan Lane John Slattery AND John Goodman? jackpot

    Don't forget Robert Morse. Sterling Cooper reunion!

    djmitchella
  • fightinfilipinofightinfilipino Angry as Hell CharlottesvilleRegistered User regular
    dang, that NYC post is giving me some nostalgia feels.

    nice trip @djmitchella !

    ffNewSig.png
    steam | Dokkan: 868846562
Sign In or Register to comment.