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[Rogue One] A Spoiler Filled Thread

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Posts

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    daveNYC wrote: »
    honovere wrote: »
    She's blatently playing the "We all now I'm guilty but I have diplomatic immunity" card. See any cop show/movie. But the bad cop / Vader isn't having any of it.

    I think when they run that play in movies it's usually the bad guy claiming immunity, and they usually are a bit more smug about it. In ANH her argument sounds like she thinks she's actually making a good argument. Though there's also the not minor issue that she's claiming diplomatic immunity after her crew put up armed resistance to a boarding party from the official government, and she herself killed a member of the military, so... yeah...

    A wizard The force did it.

  • Doctor DetroitDoctor Detroit Registered User regular
    Eh, it wouldn't be the first time something in a Star Wars prequel doesn't make sense based on what's in the OT.

  • honoverehonovere Registered User regular
    It changes the dynamic, but I think both versions work.

    Harry DresdenForardavidsdurionsN1tSt4lkerElvenshaePhoenix-DBloodySlothMvrck
  • ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    Yeah, I'm siding with Team "it makes Leia an even bigger badass retrospectively". Even if it's not a perfect fit, it's close enough for me to be happy with where we've ended up.

    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
    davidsdurionsJazzElvenshaeKanaBloodySlothRoad BlockDoctor DetroitAistanMvrckMancingtomjmcdonaldDizzy D
  • klemmingklemming Registered User regular
    It makes it look like she's playing 5-card poker, and she's trying to bluff with a single card.
    Of course, it also makes the point that what the hell else can she do?

    Nobody remembers the singer. The song remains.
  • OrogogusOrogogus San DiegoRegistered User regular
    In the new interpretation I can sort of feel Vader's frustration with this Rebel scum who don't even respect the cape enough to come up with an even slightly plausible excuse. Not just Leia, but everyone on the ship.

    "We intercepted no transmissions. (chokes) This is a consular ship. We're on a diplomatic mission." (dies)

    Come on, you're not fooling anyone. The guy choking you to death was three feet away from the disc and lightsabering the hatch maybe forty minutes ago.

    "Every-- everything's... *gack!* fine, really..." (dies)

    I guess if it were me I might have had the flagship actually beam the data to Leia's ship? Because I guess Yavin's too far? I dunno.

    Synthesis
  • klemmingklemming Registered User regular
    Of course, looking at world politics, you can get a lot of mileage out of a bare-faced denial, even if there's proof of what you did.
    "You sent troops in this country, and we've got video evidence!"
    "No we didn't."

    Nobody remembers the singer. The song remains.
    NobeardSmrtnikRichyDarkPrimushonovereJazzshrykeLanlaornBloodySlothRoad BlockElvenshaeMvrckGONG-00SynthesisFencingsaxRchanenspool32Mego ThorGiggles_FunsworthKipling217Moridin889L Ron Howardhanzo
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    Orogogus wrote: »
    In the new interpretation I can sort of feel Vader's frustration with this Rebel scum who don't even respect the cape enough to come up with an even slightly plausible excuse. Not just Leia, but everyone on the ship.

    "We intercepted no transmissions. (chokes) This is a consular ship. We're on a diplomatic mission." (dies)

    Come on, you're not fooling anyone. The guy choking you to death was three feet away from the disc and lightsabering the hatch maybe forty minutes ago.

    "Every-- everything's... *gack!* fine, really..." (dies)

    I guess if it were me I might have had the flagship actually beam the data to Leia's ship? Because I guess Yavin's too far? I dunno.

    I don't know, I think I'd beam the data to the biggest rebel ship in the area (or, all ships in the area) in the likelihood that it's the one most likely to escape. Which is what the Rogues did.
    I don't think they could have predicted Vader's ship jumping in, disabling and then boarding it.

    Just really lucky that the big ship happened to be carrying a smaller ship inside. Data transmission speeds being what they are, and the plans for a moon sized space station being (in all likelihood) huge, sneaker netting the drive down to the Tantive IV was probably quicker than trying to re-transmit it.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
  • JazzJazz irregular Un-UKRegistered User regular
    Now there's a term (sneaker net) I've not heard in a long, long time.

    Elvenshaesee317Fencingsaxspool32
  • OrogogusOrogogus San DiegoRegistered User regular
    Sorry, I meant if I were the screenwriter. Leia heads to Tatooine to get Obi-Wan while the fleet goes to Sharif and sends her the data, Vader gets the flagship and goes after Leia. Easier to claim that she's on a diplomatic mission, and it seems to make more tactical sense. Like, wouldn't they still want Obi-Wan's help even if the suicide mission failed? So you wouldn't necessarily want to tag along.

    Maybe there was a deleted scene where Leia was the one who convinced the Calamari admiral to fly off? But that seems doubtful, they were clearly saving her for the big reveal.

  • KrieghundKrieghund Registered User regular
    I probably would have kept the Tantive IV out in the outskirts of the system, just to make it flow better. The big ship could have beamed the info, they would have been in a restricted system. Much more plausible deniability.

    Doctor DetroitShivahnSynthesis
  • -Loki--Loki- Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining. Registered User regular
    edited January 2017
    Again, looking at the trailer footage, the end looks like it was very dramatically redone, just from having Krennick on the beach, as well as Jyn with the hard drive and Cassian fighting with the other rebels. I wouldn't be surprised if, when they added the Vader scene (which is confirmed to be one of the reshoots), they needed a quick way to wrap up how the plans got to the Tantive IV so they changed it from the plans being sent directly to the Tantive IV to the Tantive IV being docked with the cruiser to have that nice hallway gauntlet.

    It still kinda works with the start of ANH. Just like Obi Wan saying Yoda was the master that instructed him kinda works with what we saw in the prequels.

    -Loki- on
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
    shrykeRchanenThisAtlas in Chains
  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    edited January 2017
    Remember that the Tantive IV was preparing to depart before they knew they were going to war. The plan was probably to have the Capital Ship as escort (or cover)to Tatooine.

    Fencingsax on
    torchlight-sig-80.jpg
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    I bet Darth Vader was kicking himself for missing the plans by about four meters because he was too busy striding around mightily and playing ragdoll with the polyester uniform brigade.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
    spool32Atlas in ChainsRichy
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    You mean a space opera with laser swords and magic didn't get the physics of ship ramming on outer-space dead-on perfect? Color me shocked!

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited January 2017
    By "not dead on perfect" we mean "completely out of the fucking ballpark in three separate ways", yes. If the lead character had taken the data medium from the storage facility, then crammed it, cartoon-like, into her small pocket transmitter until it went *BLOOP* and that was that, I'd also have found it annoying (though it would not have seriously detracted from the ongoing battle either?). That would've been a case of not getting the physics of data transmission dead-on perfect.

    That pun on the other hand was spot-on, and that made it terrible in a beautiful way.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    It wasn't ramming at full speed deliberately. They wanted to push it from the start. That covers 1 and 2 quite handily..

    KruiteklemmingBloodySlothMego ThorElvenshaeGiggles_FunsworthSimpsoniaOptimusZedhonovereKraintA Dabble Of TheloniusForarAbsoluteZeroN1tSt4lker
  • breton-brawlerbreton-brawler Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    I kind of saw it similar to Tug boats. A small tug boat pushing a much larger ship. Considering it had been disabled by ion torps, Having the hammerhead contact and push it into a second destroyer seemed pretty feasible. Now the destruction of the second one, may be a bit more unlikely but momentum, huge mass, no resistance in space I'd give it a pass, because it also looked really cool.

    KetarEtiowsaKruiteKanaQuidHandgimpGONG-00ElvenshaeGiggles_FunsworthSimpsoniaSpace Picklespool32MvrckA Dabble Of TheloniusMoridin889ForarAbsoluteZerojmcdonaldN1tSt4lker
  • JazzJazz irregular Un-UKRegistered User regular
    Phoenix-D wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    It wasn't ramming at full speed deliberately. They wanted to push it from the start. That covers 1 and 2 quite handily..

    As for 3, corvettes are all power (just look at the propotion of them that is engines), so when you turn up the wick on one, I can believe it can effectively act as a reverse tug and push a disabled destroyer that has no resistance beyond its own mass.

    And in Empire it always seemed to me that those destroyers got away with sudden evasive action, enough to overcome inertial dampeners or whatever artificial gravity wizardry they use, throwing the crew around; and at worst they maybe traded a bit of paint.

    I dunno, it was an audacious move, and a desperate one obviously, but it worked for me.

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited January 2017
    Phoenix-D wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    It wasn't ramming at full speed deliberately. They wanted to push it from the start. That covers 1 and 2 quite handily..

    They're problematic given how ramming ships worked in war (so much of the actual war in Star Wars is an homage to the large-scale naval warfare of the world wars that sharp departures can feel out of place), but I do see how 1 and 2 would be done deliberately. It didn't help that it was the odd focus of the short scene--a case of the difficulty in composing a "brilliant" moment when most of us (writers included) are not brilliant people, especially martially brilliant. Sort of the Thrawn/Timothy Zahn problem.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Phoenix-D wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    It wasn't ramming at full speed deliberately. They wanted to push it from the start. That covers 1 and 2 quite handily..

    They're problematic given how ramming ships worked in war (so much of the actual war in Star Wars is an homage to the large-scale naval warfare of the world wars that sharp departures can feel out of place), but I do see how 1 and 2 would be done deliberately. It didn't help that it was the odd focus of the short scene--a case of the difficulty in composing a "brilliant" moment when most of us (writers included) are not brilliant people, especially martially brilliant. Sort of the Thrawn/Timothy Zahn problem.

    That's because in WWII as you said they rammed to disable or at least cause some damage usually as a last resort

    This wasn't that though. They weren't ramming the Star Destroyer, they were trying to push it

    This was them tug boating a disabled ship into a non disabled ship. As far as it sinking I'm willing to write that off as them ramming the edge of the wedge and assuming there's some serious structural reinforcement there.

    I agree there should have been some more Hammerheads involved or something to make it swing over that fast because that is a fuckton of mass but I'm willing to let that go because it was awesome :P

    BloodySlothElvenshaeGiggles_FunsworthForar
  • MechMantisMechMantis Registered User regular
    Well I mean, they DID hit the star destroyer pretty far to fore.

    One would imagine that most of the mass is closer to aft. So they had a bunch of leverage on it.

    UA1OmVB.png
    ElvenshaeGiggles_Funsworth
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    MechMantis wrote: »
    Well I mean, they DID hit the star destroyer pretty far to fore.

    One would imagine that most of the mass is closer to aft. So they had a bunch of leverage on it.

    Yeah but that would just end up with it spinning end over end!

  • klemmingklemming Registered User regular
    Hey, let's pick apart all the example of physics in space being displayed inaccurately in the Star Wars films! We've got 69 pages left in the thread, we can probably fit them all in.

    Nobody remembers the singer. The song remains.
    Doctor DetroitQuidElvenshaeJazzGiggles_FunsworthSimpsoniaarmageddonboundKanaJayrichoA Dabble Of TheloniusMoridin889L Ron HowardAbsoluteZeroN1tSt4lker
  • daveNYCdaveNYC Why universe hate Waspinator? Registered User regular
    klemming wrote: »
    Hey, let's pick apart all the example of physics in space being displayed inaccurately in the Star Wars films! We've got 69 pages left in the thread, we can probably fit them all in.

    Hell, are there any areas where Star Wars has realistic space physics? I'm totally fine with that though.

    Only thing I kind of wish is that ramming the Star Destroyers together didn't end up sheering the superstructure off the second one. It kind of ended up looking like some decidedly sub-par Imperial construction quality.

    Shut up, Mr. Burton! You were not brought upon this world to get it!
  • klemmingklemming Registered User regular
    Star Destroyers were made from Airfix kits, it's hardly surprising.

    Nobody remembers the singer. The song remains.
  • Doctor DetroitDoctor Detroit Registered User regular
    "Subpar Imperial construction quality"?

    Hope you aren't posting from the bridge of the Executor.

    spool32
  • daveNYCdaveNYC Why universe hate Waspinator? Registered User regular
    "Subpar Imperial construction quality"?

    Hope you aren't posting from the bridge of the Executor.

    A discussion with Kuat Drive Yards about backup control systems would probably be a good idea too.

    Shut up, Mr. Burton! You were not brought upon this world to get it!
  • Mego ThorMego Thor "I say thee...NAY!" Registered User regular
    klemming wrote: »
    Of course, looking at world politics, you can get a lot of mileage out of a bare-faced denial, even if there's proof of what you did.
    "You sent troops in this country, and we've got video evidence!"
    "No we didn't."

    Cue the Monty Python argument clinic sketch.

    kyrcl.png
  • ThirithThirith Registered User regular
    daveNYC wrote: »
    Only thing I kind of wish is that ramming the Star Destroyers together didn't end up sheering the superstructure off the second one. It kind of ended up looking like some decidedly sub-par Imperial construction quality.
    The Rogue One prequel will be about the engineer who cunningly added a design flaw to Star Destroyers in an act of clandestine resistance.

    webp-net-resizeimage.jpg
    "Nothing is gonna save us forever but a lot of things can save us today." - Night in the Woods
    ElvenshaeRichyJazzklemmingGiggles_FunsworthshrykeBloodySlothspool32Kipling217QuidRchanenThe EnderForarL Ron HowardhanzoBertezBertez
  • klemmingklemming Registered User regular
    edited January 2017
    Rogue Zero will also cover TIE Fighter design and why they thought leaving the shields was a good move, along with blocking the pilots' peripheral vision.

    klemming on
    Nobody remembers the singer. The song remains.
  • armageddonboundarmageddonbound Registered User regular
    edited January 2017
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    Have you ever seen tug boats push on a much larger boat to turn them around? Why doesn't the tug boat explode? How is it able to push a larger ship?
    *edit* someone beat me to the punch

    armageddonbound on
    Elvenshae
  • BronzeKoopaBronzeKoopa Registered User regular
    When the star destroyers went down into the shield gate I noticed the hammerhead was still stuck onto one of them, so it looked like a suicide mission for that crew.

    ElvenshaeDarkPrimusspool32Lord PalingtonA Dabble Of TheloniusN1tSt4lker
  • Space PickleSpace Pickle Registered User regular
    edited January 2017
    When the star destroyers went down into the shield gate I noticed the hammerhead was still stuck onto one of them, so it looked like a suicide mission for that crew.

    Yeah, I was hoping for them to escape but they seemed to die. :(

    Regarding the ramming stuff, I assumed that the hammerhead corvettes were specially reinforced or something, which explains why Raddus specifically called for one as opposed to just any random ship.

    Space Pickle on
    Giggles_FunsworthForarN1tSt4lker
  • -Loki--Loki- Don't pee in my mouth and tell me it's raining. Registered User regular
    When the star destroyers went down into the shield gate I noticed the hammerhead was still stuck onto one of them, so it looked like a suicide mission for that crew.

    Yeah, I was hoping for them to escape but they seemed to die. :(

    If nothing else Rogue One did a good job of showing how bleak a life it is fighting a rebellion against a much more powerful organisation. They all know they're going to die, but they just push it out of their mind and go about doing that usefully. It was a nice contrast to the OT's hopefulness. Even Empire, though it was a superior film, didn't get that across as well IMO.

    ElvenshaeFleebAPODionysusAyulinGiggles_FunsworthMoridin889Harry Dresden
  • spool32spool32 Contrary Library Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    Have you ever seen tug boats push on a much larger boat to turn them around? Why doesn't the tug boat explode? How is it able to push a larger ship?
    *edit* someone beat me to the punch

    @rockrnger may have opinions on this if he doesn't fear the spoilers :)

    rockrngerGiggles_Funsworth
  • rockrngerrockrnger Registered User regular
    edited January 2017
    spool32 wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    Have you ever seen tug boats push on a much larger boat to turn them around? Why doesn't the tug boat explode? How is it able to push a larger ship?
    *edit* someone beat me to the punch

    @rockrnger may have opinions on this if he doesn't fear the spoilers :)

    A tug is specifically designed to be an engine and nothing else so that doesn't really work but the ship would have been using the power it take to speed up to (made up sci-fi speed) and just trying to get the bigger ship to move.

    If you don't actually ram whatever you are pushing it doesn't hurt what's pushing it. Think of a car pushing another car instead of running into the back of it at top speed.

    Edit: I can push a 1000 foot long 5000 horsepower boat with a 700 horsepower 50 foot long tug on a river so space is even easier drag wise.

    rockrnger on
    ElvenshaeGiggles_Funsworth
  • armageddonboundarmageddonbound Registered User regular
    rockrnger wrote: »
    spool32 wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I saw the movie this afternoon. I'm annoyed by that space ramming thing.

    Not because naval ramming isn't a thing. It is. It even was in the era of cruisers and battleships from which Star Wars borrows.

    But amid what was a very cool looking space battle--better than anything in The Force Awakens I think--it was really dumb, because as follows:

    1) The ramming ship should've "sank" immediately, if not exploded in a fireball. If you're a small ship ramming a bigger one, you better have a suicide wish. If you wanted to live, tough shit, you shouldn't have rammed a ship ten times your length and a hundred times your mass. As in the World Wars, ramming in this context makes more sense as an act of desperation combined with a tactical cost-benefit decision: damaging, if not destroying, a Imperial ship of the line is worth a lot more than your shitty suicide ram ship. Imagine if the A-Wing that smashed into the Executor did that, and then the pilot popped out and went, "Woohwee! Now that's ship ramming!" over the charred corpses of all the bridge crew.

    2) After ramming the vastly larger ship, and all the damage that should've entailed, the ram ship is somehow able to summon several times more total thrust output. That would've been more useful in the actual ramming to deliver a crippling blow to a more valuable ship, but whatever, I guess that would've scratched your precious ram ship.

    3) Using this miraculous thrust, the much smaller ram ship somehow pushes the much, much larger destroyer into another destroyer--which immediately splinters into a million pieces. Because the ram ship plowing into a much more massive warship scratched the paint, but one destroyer very slowly striking an equally massive destroyer immediately destroys both of them. This is not helped by the fact that we already saw two ships of a very similar class crash into each other at equal, or greater speed, in The Empire Strikes Back. What did they do? Their crews shouted a bunch, they crunched together--and made a very loud, satisfying sound--and the crew bounce around inside while alarms went off, then probably shouted some more.

    It was a very dumb thing, I think. It stood out more because, honestly, the space battle (and air battle) was extremely visually impressive nonetheless.

    Also, Darth Vader making puns is a much less imposing Darth Vader.

    Have you ever seen tug boats push on a much larger boat to turn them around? Why doesn't the tug boat explode? How is it able to push a larger ship?
    *edit* someone beat me to the punch

    @rockrnger may have opinions on this if he doesn't fear the spoilers :)

    A tug is specifically designed to be an engine and nothing else so that doesn't really work but the ship would have been using the power it take to speed up to (made up sci-fi speed) and just trying to get the bigger ship to move.

    If you don't actually ram whatever you are pushing it doesn't hurt what's pushing it. Think of a car pushing another car instead of running into the back of it at top speed.

    Edit: I can push a 1000 foot long 5000 horsepower boat with a 700 horsepower 50 foot long tug on a river so space is even easier drag wise.

    Vette's are pretty much nothing but engine as well. So it seems the movie was accurate enough for adventure sci fi.

    ElvenshaeJazzrockrngerGiggles_FunsworthPhoenix-DN1tSt4lker
  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    So I watched this movie.



    HOLY GODDAMN SHIT THIS MOVIE YOU GUYS.



    This blew my socks right off. Fucking Star Wars, I want it now, and I started to not give a fuck about Star Wars after seeing Force Awakens and being kinda meh about it. I guess all I needed was a fresh film that included exactly 1 Jedi person so the things they did actually looked cool compared to what everyone else was doing, and kickass peaks and grim lows and I guess a little Darth Vader here or there maybe but don't push it okay???

    Tarkin looked good. I don't know how I would've felt about the fidelity if I didn't know going into it that he was CGI, but he didn't look awful or contrast horribly with the other actors. Maybe the effect won't age well, but if it doesn't at least it will be consistent with the rest of the CGI in the film.


    Fucking shooting a TIE fighter with a space longbow, fucking EU Starfighters brought to the screen, fucking Hammerhead corvettes and the Rebel fleet punching it out of hyperspace in attack mode cuz they don't give a FUCK 'bout your rules, son, AT-ATs getting fucked right up and probably showing us that the models went under drastic improvements for Hoth...

    If there was something I didn't like I think it was that I didn't know this was a suicide mission for Rogue One. I thought we'd maybe get another film or two out of Jyn Erso. :|

    Also I thought the first couple of callbacks were endearing... but I think I got fed-up with them around the time R2 and C-3PO had their cameo appearance. Yes, yes, this is Star Wars, I understand it - please let this be its own film, it's fine, it's a kickass thing on its own merit without needed to remind Star Wars fans that OH MY WORD THIS IS MORE STAR WARS.



    I'm going to go do something Star Warsy on my computer now, because I need my fix again. Gotta get that shit back in my veins.

    With Love and Courage
    Giggles_FunsworthOrogogusklemmingHarry DresdenJazzElvenshaeHandgimpFencingsaxDark Raven XSimpsoniaFroThulhuarmageddonboundForarDarkPrimusFakefauxGONG-00kimeAyulinRchanenThat_Guyspool32
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