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Got my brother a new vid card for his bday...

WezoinWezoin Registered User regular
edited December 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
It's an Asus 8600GT 256mb. He only has a 300W power supply, but I saw online that alot of the 8600s will run on that, and thats including some ridiculous "Intel Core 2 Duo Extreme" processor on the system. I can't seem to find any recommended power supply for this card, but the guy at the store said it'd probably run on a 300W and that there was no chance of any damage coming from it.

I guess I should probably explain here that a couple years back my cousin got a videocard installed by futureshop. Apparently he didn't have a big enough power supply in his system and it destroyed the whole computer. That is why i'm so paranoid about this (I actually have no proof that this was the reason, but this futureshop had to replace his machine, im assuming it was at least semi-truth)

He said the "worst case scenario" is that the machine won't turn on at all, in which case just remove the card and go back to the old one (integrated 6100) until he can get a new power supply. I realise it depends alot on what he has in his machine, but it's not that much. Athlon 64X2, 1 hard drive, 1 wireless network card. The hard drive I believe is a 5400rpm. I also got him a gb of ram (pc3200, if it matters) that will bring him up to 2gb, is there any real risk of breaking anything?

Wezoin on

Posts

  • RookRook Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    The guy is telling you the truth, and 300W is probably more than fine.

    Rook on
  • PrimesghostPrimesghost Registered User regular
    edited November 2007
    300 watts if pretty weak. I don't know the recommended power supply for this card but to be honest a 450 or 500 watt power supply should be easy to find in the 50 - 60 dollar (US) range. Better to be safe than sorry. But 300 watts will probably run the card. One thing to keep in mind is that you will actually get better performance if the card is able to draw all the power it wants for rendering instead of just being able to draw enough power to run.

    Primesghost on
  • pacbowlpacbowl Los AngelesRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    One thing to keep in mind is that you will actually get better performance if the card is able to draw all the power it wants for rendering instead of just being able to draw enough power to run.

    Chances are it won't destroy the computer. It will probably run, but you won't know if he's getting the full benefit of the card unless it's at least a 450 watt.

    pacbowl on
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  • GPIA7RGPIA7R Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I ran into power issues with a lesser card.

    A PCI-express video card sucks a lot of power, and you must must MUST make sure that you plug the power cords and the PCI-E power cable into the card itself, providing that the card IS pci-e. I did not look up that card, so I wouldn't know.

    But take it from someone with experience in this issue - PCI-E cards must have their special power cords plugged into them. Also, 300w is pretty weak for an upper-end vid card.

    GPIA7R on
  • The Rocking MThe Rocking M Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Before buying a PSU be sure to look at the power efficiency rating this will give you an idea of the PSU's actual power output. My previous power supply was rated at 400 watts total but its actual output was rated at 240 watts.

    The Rocking M on
  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    What brand of power supply is it? 300W is PLENTY of power for that setup.

    tsmvengy on
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  • KhavallKhavall British ColumbiaRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I think we should clear up here that overall wattage is not as important for running GPUs as the Amperage on the 12V rail/rails. I think the 8800 needs 26 amps on the 12v rail/rail aggregate, and I'm not sure what the 8600 needs.

    300W should be enough to supply power to a good GPU, a good processor, and the rest of the computer. I myself am using a 500W on the computer I'm building, but only because it was free with rebates. But you could have 1kW and have a GPU not working if it's not getting enough current.


    Simplified way too much: Power amount is important for running everything. Current amount within specific voltages is important for specific items.

    Now, power is determinable with current, but it's the specific voltage of the current that determines what it'll do with a specific part. So you could not have a PSU that's 20 Watts with 28 amps along the 12 volt rail. But you could either have a 12V rail at 28 amps and a 8V rail at 12 amps or 36 amps along the 12v rail and no 8V rail for 432 Watts.

    So if the PSU can't supply enough power for everything, it'll just not work, and if it can't supply enough current, then the GPU just won't work, so you'll get a blank screen most likely. You won't break anything if this is the case though. Just make sure you check the current(Amperage)

    Khavall on
  • ApogeeApogee Lancks In Every Game Ever Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Worst case scenario, the computer will just turn off when it draws more pwoer thant he PSU can provide. I've had that happen when I upgaded my vid card once - the PSU was crap and could provide enough to turn on/funtion normaly stuff, but in a game it'd shut off almsot immedeitly. Upgrade the PSU if its a problem.

    Apogee on
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  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Yeah, if you want to be sure, look at the sticker on the side of the PSU that details how many amps are on each rail.

    tsmvengy on
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  • WezoinWezoin Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Alright thanks for the info. His birthday is right before christmas, so maybe I'll make his xmas present a bigger power supply.

    Anyway, it's a Compaq computer, fairly new (about a year old, I'd guess) I realise Compaq are a "value brand" of computer, so im expecting the power supply isn't all that impressive, but I'll see. Just glad it's confirmed I can try it out without risking screwing anything up.

    Wezoin on
  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS
    edited December 2007
    Another thing to watch with Compaqs is that a lot of them use a proprietary power-supply. I remember fixing one where the power-supply was L-shaped and you could not have fit a normal power-supply into that bracket or within the space provided.

    ViolentChemistry on
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