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[Roleplaying Games] Thank God I Finally Have A Table For Cannabis Potency.

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Posts

  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    WACriminal wrote: »
    Does this look like the kind of thing anybody would play?

    I'd play it, but I'd play just about anything with Pokemon in it. I did also enjoy Dungeon World the one time I got to play it, though, so an additional mark of interest there.

    Juuuust to further compare notes, I notice you've got Catch 'Em, Battle 'Em, Train 'Em, Find 'Em Moves. Don't suppose there are, say, others along the lines of "Befriendin' 'Em" and/or "Identifyin' 'Em?"

    Those happened to be the two additional basic Trainer actions I had available back when I was wrastling with potential skill lists. Figuring out What Kind of Pokemon Are You and making good friends what to stick together with seemed fitting.

    I guess so, but they're not named as such. There's a Bond move that you use to improve the Pokemon's Bond stat, and a Consult Your Pokedex move that works similar to Discern Realities, where you get to choose from a list of questions.

    Marshmallow
  • DenadaDenada Registered User regular
    I'd call the move Who's That Pokemon? and require that it be said like the show whenever it's used.

    WACriminalElvenshaeFuselageRingojdarksuncrimsoncoyoteToxBrodyPolaritietzeentchlingAnialos
  • RingoRingo Out of things to say Heartbreak HillRegistered User regular
    Then play the "It's Pikachu!" clip every time they fail the roll

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
    FuselageMegaMekdiscrider
  • RingoRingo Out of things to say Heartbreak HillRegistered User regular
    As far as playing the game, I am curious about the moves. I assume being a DW hack that most everything will be narrative so you can have your Pokemon do most anything you can think up that fits within the fiction. How do moves fit into that?

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    edited January 2018
    Ringo wrote: »
    As far as playing the game, I am curious about the moves. I assume being a DW hack that most everything will be narrative so you can have your Pokemon do most anything you can think up that fits within the fiction. How do moves fit into that?

    There's two different kinds of combat: narrative combat, and systematic combat.
    Narrative combat is handled in a loosey-goosey, general kind of way. Like there's a nest of Rattata blocking your path through a cave, maybe you just want to roll a quick Battle 'Em! or Train 'Em! move with your Gloom to disperse a cloud of sleep spores (if it has that move) into the cave, allowing you to pass by. It works because the Rattata nest isn't an opponent, it's an obstacle, so there's no need to simulate an actual 50 vs. 1 fight or whatever. Similarly, you could use Rattata's Hyper Fang move to get him to cut through a rope for you, or Pikachu's Thunder Shock to fry a piece of electronics, etc. General narrative stuff. Even Magikarp's Splash could, conceivably, be used narratively to some effect.

    Systematic combat, on the other hand, works on a more turn-based system like D&D does. This is for situations like facing Gym Leaders to earn badges, or weakening a wild Pokemon so you can attempt to catch it -- situations where the blow-by-blow is narratively engaging. Turn order is based on Spd (similar to initiative order), on your turn you can take one Trainer move (AKA something you do like use an item, soak the battlefield in water to grant a bonus to an Ice-type move, evacuate children from the area, etc.) and one combat move (from the list of 4 moves your Pokemon has).

    Each combat move is set up with a "+X vs. Y" format, where the bonus to your roll is the difference between one of your Pokemon's stats and one of its opponent's stats. For instance, Tackle is "+Atk vs. Def", which means that you add your Pokemon's Atk and subtract its target's Def from your 2d6 roll. In extremely mismatched cases, this may mean you don't even need to roll for your move, but overkill doesn't make the move any stronger in terms of damage. This just means that if you can properly suss out your opponent's weak stats, you can sneak in some damage and effects even with low-level Pokemon.

    Type effectiveness works on a simple "Super Effective, Normal, Not Very Effective, Immune" basis. Super Effective = 2x dmg, Not Very Effective = 1/2x dmg rounded down, Immune = no effect.

    Some things I'm trying to make true about the system:

    1) Everything is still 2d6 + a thing. If I ever get into percentage rolls or random tables, I done fucked up.
    2) No species is strictly sub-optimal. They all have their own significance, narratively and/or in combat. The player who's primarily interested in collecting Eevee versions because they're cute should be able to enjoy the game just as much as the player who specializes in fishing, or the player who refuses to train any Dark types because they "seem evil", or the player who enjoys collecting creepy Psychic and Ghost types. Individual challenges may be more difficult depending on your collection, but should not be insurmountable if you're able to work together with your party.
    3) Pokemon are stronger in battle if you've spent time bonding with them. Your starter Rattata may not take down a legendary Pokemon on his own, but he won't just be cannon fodder either.
    4) Both styles of combat feel satisfying and serve their own purpose. Nobody wants to hash out a fight with 50 individual Rattata using a turn-based system, but people do want to have the satisfaction of building an effective team of 6 to take down that asshole gym leader, or staging a 4-person raid on Team Rocket HQ to rescue your kidnapped starters.

    WACriminal on
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    edited January 2018
    @WACriminal

    Disappointed that there's not a "Super Effective!" level, there ...

    Also...
    Even Magikarp's Splash could, conceivably, be used narratively to some effect.

    No. No, it could not. :(
    :D

    Elvenshae on
    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
    WACriminalFuselage
  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    @WACriminal

    Disappointed that there's not a "Super Effective!" level, there ...

    Also...
    Even Magikarp's Splash could, conceivably, be used narratively to some effect.

    No. No, it could not. :(
    :D

    Ugh I actually meant to type "Super Effective", but I'm doing this while taking calls at work, so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Elvenshae
  • admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    The moment Magikarp's splash can be used to any effect is the moment it ceases to be splash.

    ElvenshaeFuselagedoomybearBrodyMegaMek
  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    admanb wrote: »
    The moment Magikarp's splash can be used to any effect is the moment it ceases to be splash.

    That is for the GM to decide! Personally, I'd side with you on this.

    Fuselage
  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    Actually, Magikarp is a deadly Pokémon. According to the Pokédex, Magikarp can jump the height of a mountain. This means that when Magikarp attacks you he would jump the height of a mountain (A minimum of 8,200 feet) and he would hurdle at you at 750+ feet per second assuming there is no wind resistance. Whether he hits you in the head, chest, or knees, your body would be impacted by 400 G of force, which you would likely not survive. Your neck would snap back, if not snap, your body would rip itself apart, and you would most probably be decapitated. Basically, Magikarps attacks would be, messy. Magikarp is one of the most powerful Pokémon ever.

    WACriminalBrodyJacoby
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    *splash*

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    Actually, Magikarp is a deadly Pokémon. According to the Pokédex, Magikarp can jump the height of a mountain. This means that when Magikarp attacks you he would jump the height of a mountain (A minimum of 8,200 feet) and he would hurdle at you at 750+ feet per second assuming there is no wind resistance. Whether he hits you in the head, chest, or knees, your body would be impacted by 400 G of force, which you would likely not survive. Your neck would snap back, if not snap, your body would rip itself apart, and you would most probably be decapitated. Basically, Magikarps attacks would be, messy. Magikarp is one of the most powerful Pokémon ever.

    The Pokedex is actually unreliable on this point. In Platinum:
    A Magikarp living for many years can leap a mountain using Splash. The move remains useless, though.

    On the other hand, in Gold:
    An underpowered, pathetic Pokémon. It may jump high on rare occasions, but never more than seven feet.

    So basically what I'm saying is, Magikarp: Mostly Harmless.

  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

    Oh I know, but Gold's Pokedex seems to think that the mountain-jumping claim is a myth, and that Magikarp can leap 7 feet at best.

  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

    Point of order: a fish cannot fall at 400g on Earth; it can, at best, fall at 1g.

    Until it hits terminal velocity, at which point it's acceleration should float between -x - 1g, depending on whether or not it's tumbling. :D

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
    italianranmaBrody
  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    WACriminal wrote: »
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

    Oh I know, but Gold's Pokedex seems to think that the mountain-jumping claim is a myth, and that Magikarp can leap 7 feet at best.

    Yeah, but the Mountain leap comes from the Platinum Pokedex, which was made years later when more research was done. So in Gold, maybe the mountain leap hadn't been seen before or wasn't actually recorded and by Platinum it had been seen.

  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

    Point of order: a fish cannot fall at 400g on Earth; it can, at best, fall at 1g.

    Until it hits terminal velocity, at which point it's acceleration should float between -x - 1g, depending on whether or not it's tumbling. :D
    Actually, Magikarp is a deadly Pokémon. According to the Pokédex, Magikarp can jump the height of a mountain. This means that when Magikarp attacks you he would jump the height of a mountain (A minimum of 8,200 feet) and he would hurdle at you at 750+ feet per second assuming there is no wind resistance. Whether he hits you in the head, chest, or knees, your body would be impacted by 400 G of force, which you would likely not survive. Your neck would snap back, if not snap, your body would rip itself apart, and you would most probably be decapitated. Basically, Magikarps attacks would be, messy. Magikarp is one of the most powerful Pokémon ever.

  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Platinum is just repeating tired magikarp propaganda.

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Platinum is just repeating tired magikarp propaganda.

    Prof. Rowan is a serious scientist and would not just repeat propaganda. He would study and research this thoroughly, not create Fake Pokedexs.

  • RingoRingo Out of things to say Heartbreak HillRegistered User regular
    @WACriminal Okay, so for the turn by turn stuff, and just using moves in general I'm gonna throw it out there - four moves is not enough. I know that's what the games use, and I know that it looks really good on your sheets, but having played several campaigns using Pokemon Tabletop United 1.04 and 1.05 - even the six moves that system starts your pokemon with can seem limiting. It's not so much the individual pokemon that's the problem (though it can be depending on the pokemon's move list) but more that when you assemble the team you want and realize all your 'mons have Tackle. Or Flamethrower. Or another move that doesn't get more interesting the more you're forced to use it. Without some way to increase move numbers, you'll find your battle focused players picking pokemon for move lists and type advantage while "themed" teams leave their players at a disadvantage.

    And then there's the other half - move diversity. I don't want Tackle, nobody wants Tackle - but Tackle is in the move list. The more your trainer or the individual 'mons can modify what their movelist looks like, or even modify Tackle itself, the happier and more excited your players are going to be with any given 'mon. PTU has abilities called "Move Sync" and "Type Sync" which allow Trainers to re-type the moves of the 'mon, or even the 'mon itself. It opens up a whole new avenue to explore and was used so much in our campaigns we were slightly annoyed that we had to spend class features to get it.

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
    WACriminalElvenshae
  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    Ringo wrote: »
    @WACriminal Okay, so for the turn by turn stuff, and just using moves in general I'm gonna throw it out there - four moves is not enough. I know that's what the games use, and I know that it looks really good on your sheets, but having played several campaigns using Pokemon Tabletop United 1.04 and 1.05 - even the six moves that system starts your pokemon with can seem limiting. It's not so much the individual pokemon that's the problem (though it can be depending on the pokemon's move list) but more that when you assemble the team you want and realize all your 'mons have Tackle. Or Flamethrower. Or another move that doesn't get more interesting the more you're forced to use it. Without some way to increase move numbers, you'll find your battle focused players picking pokemon for move lists and type advantage while "themed" teams leave their players at a disadvantage.

    And then there's the other half - move diversity. I don't want Tackle, nobody wants Tackle - but Tackle is in the move list. The more your trainer or the individual 'mons can modify what their movelist looks like, or even modify Tackle itself, the happier and more excited your players are going to be with any given 'mon. PTU has abilities called "Move Sync" and "Type Sync" which allow Trainers to re-type the moves of the 'mon, or even the 'mon itself. It opens up a whole new avenue to explore and was used so much in our campaigns we were slightly annoyed that we had to spend class features to get it.

    Hmmm, good point. I did try to introduce the concept of modifying moves, with stuff like Vicious (Rattata's page) and Static (Pikachu's page), and TMs can obviously be used to further customize individual mons. Other options I might try to address this concern:

    1) I could just dispense with the limitations on number of moves learned, similar to the character class playbooks, where you're only limited by your level.
    2) I could use a "prepared spells" approach, where the Pokemon can know as many moves as you can teach it, but can only have four/six/whatever prepared for use at any given time. Allow players to adjust their prepared lists at some trivial, common occurrence like "a long rest" or "a Train 'Em! move". Give certain playbooks moves that make it even easier to trade out prepared moves.
    3) Players could start at 4 moves allowed per Pokemon, then increase that number through things like earning badges, taking advanced moves, etc.
    4) A Pokemon you catch in the wild starts with 4/6/whatever move slots. When it evolves, it unlocks 2/4/6/whatever more, as you add a new page to its playbook.

  • RingoRingo Out of things to say Heartbreak HillRegistered User regular
    1 and 2 seem the most simple for the players. Just depends on whether you think there's a mechanical or narrative reason that makes the move limits interesting.

    Personally I think I like 1 the most for the DW system. That way there's still stuff to look forward to as you level, but you don't have to worry about losing the utility of String Shot because you picked up Struggle Bug

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
  • MarshmallowMarshmallow Swish SwishRegistered User regular
    edited January 2018
    The method I went with was to allow your Pokemon to learn a potentially infinite amount of moves as part of their leveling process (dubbed their 'movepool'), but that in any given battle you could only commit to using four of them (the 'moveset'), which got locked in as you used them (ie. you start with zero locked in moves, but on your first turn use Tackle, Your first slot is now Tackle with the other three slots free for any learned move still in your movepool). With a special action, you could spend your turn to clear out all your chosen Moveset if you selected your Moves particularly poorly through the fight, or if you desperately needed to change up your tactics mid-battle.

    Meant you could choose to have a wide variety of type coverage and niche options (niche options can be amazing when they come up), but still meant you had to commit to a general strategy, and if you locked yourself in to a poor moveset you would have to waste a turn rolling back your choices or risk getting styled on by opponent counter-actions you didn't account for.

    Edit: The move 'reset' actually very rarely comes up though. Four Moves chosen from a generous selection is usually more than enough to faint anything that lives. Most playtesting has only involved one or two Pokemon though, so perhaps with full teams it'll start being more important to switch up your type coverage or whatever.

    Marshmallow on
    img]
    RingoWACriminalElvenshaeKadoken
  • KadokenKadoken One batch, two batch, poyo and hIIIIII Registered User regular
    I have six NPCs and a ship directly named after music references.

    Am I a Jojo?

    I am going to shoot this mystery with my pistol of deduction -Sherlock Holmes (Scott Benson)
    Mine TTRPG blog http://darkheresychainsofmalice.blogspot.com/
    doomybear
  • doomybeardoomybear Hi People Registered User regular
    Kadoken wrote: »
    I have six NPCs and a ship directly named after music references.

    Am I a Jojo?

    do your characters also pose like this when they speak
    latest?cb=20160108081202&path-prefix=protagonist

    what a happy day it is
  • Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    Kadoken wrote: »
    I have six NPCs and a ship directly named after music references.

    Am I a Jojo?

    I've got an upcoming scene planned with the Highwaymen supergroup

    Although oddly enough, the highwaymen in my game take inspiration from Adam Ant

    Kadoken
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

    Point of order: a fish cannot fall at 400g on Earth; it can, at best, fall at 1g.

    Until it hits terminal velocity, at which point it's acceleration should float between -x - 1g, depending on whether or not it's tumbling. :D
    Actually, Magikarp is a deadly Pokémon. According to the Pokédex, Magikarp can jump the height of a mountain. This means that when Magikarp attacks you he would jump the height of a mountain (A minimum of 8,200 feet) and he would hurdle at you at 750+ feet per second assuming there is no wind resistance. Whether he hits you in the head, chest, or knees, your body would be impacted by 400 G of force, which you would likely not survive. Your neck would snap back, if not snap, your body would rip itself apart, and you would most probably be decapitated. Basically, Magikarps attacks would be, messy. Magikarp is one of the most powerful Pokémon ever.

    My question is how Magikarps learn to jump that high when they clearly don't have a physiology adapted to terminal velocity impacts. The pokedex should more accurately read "A Magikarp living for many years can leap a mountain using Splash once. The move remains useless, though, because it kills the Magikarp in the process."

    "The shore does not dream of you." - Blind poet Gallan.
    Elvenshae
  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

    Point of order: a fish cannot fall at 400g on Earth; it can, at best, fall at 1g.

    Until it hits terminal velocity, at which point it's acceleration should float between -x - 1g, depending on whether or not it's tumbling. :D
    Actually, Magikarp is a deadly Pokémon. According to the Pokédex, Magikarp can jump the height of a mountain. This means that when Magikarp attacks you he would jump the height of a mountain (A minimum of 8,200 feet) and he would hurdle at you at 750+ feet per second assuming there is no wind resistance. Whether he hits you in the head, chest, or knees, your body would be impacted by 400 G of force, which you would likely not survive. Your neck would snap back, if not snap, your body would rip itself apart, and you would most probably be decapitated. Basically, Magikarps attacks would be, messy. Magikarp is one of the most powerful Pokémon ever.

    My question is how Magikarps learn to jump that high when they clearly don't have a physiology adapted to terminal velocity impacts. The pokedex should more accurately read "A Magikarp living for many years can leap a mountain using Splash once. This kills the Magikarp."

    SageinaRage
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    edited January 2018
    Brody wrote: »
    My question is how Magikarps learn to jump that high when they clearly don't have a physiology adapted to terminal velocity impacts. The pokedex should more accurately read "A Magikarp living for many years can leap a mountain using Splash once before obliterating itself and whatever it crashed into. This has prompted the various academic Pokemon societies to consider renaming Magikarp to MADgikarp but, sadly, the greater community of trainers has failed to adopt the new moniker."

    Rend on
    Elvenshae
  • italianranmaitalianranma Registered User regular
    Kadoken wrote: »
    I have six NPCs and a ship directly named after music references.

    Am I a Jojo?

    I've got an upcoming scene planned with the Highwaymen supergroup

    Although oddly enough, the highwaymen in my game take inspiration from Adam Ant

    My college gaming group came up with an interesting format for D&D: we each created a character named after a local street in downtown Orange Ca, and stated them from levels 1-20. Then we each came up with an adventure at whatever level we wanted as we rotated DMs. Players got random characters each game and each character had their own portfolio where you could write notes about how you played them so we could develop idiosyncrasy etc. My games all revolved around a villainous warforged I-5 who wanted to continue building new warforged until the cities were overcrowded with them, eventually displacing the organic life with cheap manufactured labor. All his lieutenants where other nearby freeways and interstates.

    I still collect interesting names and plot points whenever I see them pop up. Street names in particular I find inspiring for a variety of uses.

    飛べねぇ豚はただの豚だ。
    DracomicronRingoElvenshaedestroyah87WACriminalFuselageBrodyRainfallKadoken
  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    I would have thought it just takes many years for a Magikarp to Splash up a mountain.
    It should probably stay in water though?
    I'm not sure what that Magikarp is doing, but it's clearly lost.

    Steam Community page: http://steamcommunity.com/id/discrider/
    Oh hey! A knife!
    Elvenshae
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Missed this ...
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

    Point of order: a fish cannot fall at 400g on Earth; it can, at best, fall at 1g.

    Until it hits terminal velocity, at which point it's acceleration should float between -x - 1g, depending on whether or not it's tumbling. :D
    Actually, Magikarp is a deadly Pokémon. According to the Pokédex, Magikarp can jump the height of a mountain. This means that when Magikarp attacks you he would jump the height of a mountain (A minimum of 8,200 feet) and he would hurdle at you at 750+ feet per second assuming there is no wind resistance. Whether he hits you in the head, chest, or knees, your body would be impacted by 400 G of force, which you would likely not survive. Your neck would snap back, if not snap, your body would rip itself apart, and you would most probably be decapitated. Basically, Magikarps attacks would be, messy. Magikarp is one of the most powerful Pokémon ever.

    Without wind resistance, it falls at exactly 1g.

    omgbfz5lzi1s.png
    Steam: Elvenshae // PSN: Elvenshae // WotC: Elvenshae
    The Disappearance of Inigo Sharpe: Tomas à Dunsanin
  • [Expletive deleted][Expletive deleted] The mediocre doctor NorwayRegistered User regular
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Missed this ...
    Elvenshae wrote: »
    Yeah, but it's not Splash that hurts you. It's the 22 lbs. fish that's falling at 400 Gs that hurts.

    Point of order: a fish cannot fall at 400g on Earth; it can, at best, fall at 1g.

    Until it hits terminal velocity, at which point it's acceleration should float between -x - 1g, depending on whether or not it's tumbling. :D
    Actually, Magikarp is a deadly Pokémon. According to the Pokédex, Magikarp can jump the height of a mountain. This means that when Magikarp attacks you he would jump the height of a mountain (A minimum of 8,200 feet) and he would hurdle at you at 750+ feet per second assuming there is no wind resistance. Whether he hits you in the head, chest, or knees, your body would be impacted by 400 G of force, which you would likely not survive. Your neck would snap back, if not snap, your body would rip itself apart, and you would most probably be decapitated. Basically, Magikarps attacks would be, messy. Magikarp is one of the most powerful Pokémon ever.

    Without wind resistance, it falls at exactly 1g.

    Yeah. And you can't fall at an acceleration of 750 ft/s, as that is a velocity. Acceleration would be measured in ft/s2.

    Also, you can't be hit with a force of 400 g, as force is measured in kg m/s2 (a.k.a. Newtons) and 400 g = 400 x 9.81 m/s2 (in other words, an acceleration). (Not going to convert that to Imperial.)

    (Also, also, you should be looking at the energy transferred in the impact (and conservation of momentum), not the "force" which is kinda meaningless for this type of event.)

    In fairness, these concepts are usually used quite incorrectly and/or imprecisely in common parlance, so a lot of people get this wrong.

    Sic transit gloria mundi.
    Elvenshae
  • RingoRingo Out of things to say Heartbreak HillRegistered User regular

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
    SleepElvenshaeBrodySteelhawk[Expletive deleted]
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    @WACriminal What I think we are trying to get at is that there should be a skill where you use advanced mathematics to calculate how much damage a Magikarp would deal given a specific jump height, and deal damage equal to the variation from the correct answer.

    "The shore does not dream of you." - Blind poet Gallan.
    WACriminal
  • DelduwathDelduwath Registered User regular
    Actually, the attack would just inflict Sleep.

    RendElvenshaeitalianranma
  • WACriminalWACriminal Dying Is Easy, Young Man Living Is HarderRegistered User regular
    *takes notes furiously... and confusedly*

    RingoFuselage
  • discriderdiscrider Registered User regular
    Actually, at terminal velocity, you fall at exactly 1G, having started at 0G

    Steam Community page: http://steamcommunity.com/id/discrider/
    Oh hey! A knife!
  • Grunt's GhostsGrunt's Ghosts Registered User regular
    So what's everyone is saying is that I need to write a nasty letter to VSauce3's Jake?

  • DenadaDenada Registered User regular
    Based on this last page or so, I think you need a move for your Pokemon game called "Actually...", where you change what just happened because whoever was describing it got the details wrong.

    Grunt's GhostsBrodyElvenshaecrimsoncoyote
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