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[Book] Thread 20XXAD

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Posts

  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Echo wrote: »
    The Quantum Magician starts really good.

    Together with The Quantum Thief we only need a Quantum Fighter and a Quantum Cleric.

    I stick you in a box, and then force the waveform to collapse with a healthier version of you. Granted, its technically not you, as its a healthier version of you, so you kind of die in the process...

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson
    chrono_traveller
  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Echo wrote: »
    The Quantum Magician starts really good.

    Together with The Quantum Thief we only need a Quantum Fighter and a Quantum Cleric.

    I stick you in a box, and then force the waveform to collapse with a healthier version of you. Granted, its technically not you, as its a healthier version of you, so you kind of die in the process...

    makes more sense as anything in Quantum Thief

    This machine kills threads.
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    redx wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    Echo wrote: »
    The Quantum Magician starts really good.

    Together with The Quantum Thief we only need a Quantum Fighter and a Quantum Cleric.

    I stick you in a box, and then force the waveform to collapse with a healthier version of you. Granted, its technically not you, as its a healthier version of you, so you kind of die in the process...

    makes more sense as anything in Quantum Thief

    Eh, most of Quantum Thief really wasn't that bad. Its all at least internally consistent, and in service to the story.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson
    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudEchoWassermelone
  • credeikicredeiki Registered User regular
    credeiki wrote: »
    I'm now reading Day of the Oprichnik*, a modern Russian scifi-ish book set in the near future in which there's a new Russian monarchy. It is the day in the life of a member of the near future iteration of the secret police (the earliest historical iteration of which was called oprichnina, under Ivan the terrible, but we are more familiar with the terms cheka, nkvd, kgb, fsb...)
    It's really vibrantly written and amazingly well-translated by Jamey Gambrell. The immediacy and flow and punchiness of the writing is preserved, including a bunch of rhyming and assonance stuff that really speaks to the translator's competence. It's a short book in first person that just tracks this (awful) young chekist through his day in a near future Moscow where trends of Russian nationalism and conservatism have been taken to the max, so there's this fascinating mixture of traditional Russian food and clothing; state oppression/ultraviolence (...so do not read this if you think you don't want to deal with a fairly explicit rape scene in the first 20 pages); orthodox prudery--there's a governmental ban on cursing, for example; and then some near-future cyberpunkish stuff--both standard and weird future drugs, Chinese political influence, near future communications and news systems, surveillance state methods, of course.

    I'm really interested to read more by the author, Vladimir Sorokin, especially if this same translator has a hand in any of his other works. The writing is so good! I've read too much pared down first person stuff recently; I like it when an author doesn't sacrifice imagery and rich style just because he's also creating a voice for the first person narrator.

    *I was thinking, 95% chance this is in Russian called Den' Oprichnika, and I am correct, and in that case, why on earth do we go with this really cumbersome and slightly off translation instead of calling it The Oprichnik's Day? I mean, in a way, Day of the Oprichnik suggests, this is a time in which this sort of person thrives, but it loses the meaning of, 'a day in the life of', which is the core setup/concept of the book. That's my only translation quibble here.

    Lol there could never be a government ban on cursing in Russia, swears are the national language.

    it leads to some exchanges that really made me laugh, like this one in the oprichnina inner circle (Batya is of course their leader/patriarch/yes they call him dad)
    Our commander takes us all in with a searching gaze:
    "His Majesty's daughter, Anna Vasilevna, has sued for divorce from Count Urusov."
    Now there you go! That really is news! His Majesty's family!
    "Motherfucker!"
    Batya immediately socks me in the jaw.
    "Shameless!"
    "Forgive me, Batya, the devil made me do it, I couldn't help..."
    "Fuck your own mother, it will be less expensive."
    "Batya, you know my mother passed away..." I try to get him on pity.
    "Fuck her in the grave."
    I'm silent as I wipe my split lip with my undershirt.
    "I'll beat the brazen, rabble-rousing spirit out of you!" Batya threatens us. "Whoever fouls his lips with curses--will not stay long in the oprichnina!"

    Steam, LoL: credeiki
    air-photos.tumblr.com
    jakobaggerA Kobold's KoboldflamebroiledchickenJacobkosh
  • wanderingwandering Registered User regular
    Bogart wrote: »
    Just started The Affirmation, by Christopher Priest, which looks to be about memory the same way The Glamour was about invisibility.

    Coincidentally I discovered the copy that's been sitting on my shelf for years is actually a first edition worth maybe fifty quid. Huzzah.
    But if you read it you’ll give it wear and tear and hurt its value!

    Best to just buy books without actually reading them

    atcwebmqawjl.png
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    edited February 27
    Finished Quantom Magician. Excellent book overall if a wee bit pulpy towards the end. I also wish there was a bit more exposition at the start. I don’t feel like anything was gained with less understanding of the different human species and their backgrounds.

    Quid on
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    I am not enjoying the writing in Sunshine at all. It reminds me of Uprooted but with constantly repeated details. I like the concept and main character, but I can only take so many descriptions of just how otherworldly vampires are.

  • knitdanknitdan Oh no Too much hunnyRegistered User regular
    Just started Space Opera by Catheryne Valente and it reminds me a lot of Douglas Adams if Adams had absolutely no restraint with regard to simile and metaphor and analogy.

    I like what I’ve read so far but if she doesn’t tone down the purple prose a little after the introductory chapters I’m going to be quite cross.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
  • jakobaggerjakobagger LO THY DREAD EMPIRE CHAOS IS RESTORED Registered User regular
    knitdan wrote: »
    Just started Space Opera by Catheryne Valente and it reminds me a lot of Douglas Adams if Adams had absolutely no restraint with regard to simile and metaphor and analogy.

    I like what I’ve read so far but if she doesn’t tone down the purple prose a little after the introductory chapters I’m going to be quite cross.

    Yeah that's uh, not how she rolls, from my experience. Haven't read this particular one, but the couple of hers I've read (and loved) we're all very. . stylistically distinct is maybe a way to describe it? Like, Speakeasy has a whole lot of 1920ish slang, all through the narrator's voice also.

    Since this has 'opera' in the title I would expect a fair degree of overwroughtness tbh

    bgg / steam / goodreads / Bnet: Bygasto#2537
    credeikiCroakerBCwebguy20MahnmutPhoenix-D
  • knitdanknitdan Oh no Too much hunnyRegistered User regular
    Yeah I read Deathless not too long ago and the prose wasn’t nearly as wrought so I’m sure it’s something she adopted for this book. I’m just hoping it either backs off a little bit or my brain adjusts.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
  • credeikicredeiki Registered User regular
    knitdan wrote: »
    Yeah I read Deathless not too long ago and the prose wasn’t nearly as wrought so I’m sure it’s something she adopted for this book. I’m just hoping it either backs off a little bit or my brain adjusts.

    The writing styles in Deathless and Radiance were completely different. She really commits and has huge range; it's impressive!

    I've been thinking about reading Space Opera, so I'm curious to hear your take on it. I loved Deathless (to no one's surprise) and thought Radiance was very good but not as much something I was into.

    Steam, LoL: credeiki
    air-photos.tumblr.com
    Mahnmut
  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    The past is another country. They do things differently there.

    QuidEchochrono_travellerjakobaggerN1tSt4lkerEddyPowerpuppies
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    The one that always stuck with me was the brain caps line in 3001: The Final Odyssey that insisted no woman ever accepted the appearance of being bald. And that one was published in 1997.

    I don't recall any of his work being aggressively misogynist, but it's definitely the work of an old white guy raised in an era where jokes like that were just considered cheeky.

  • KrieghundKrieghund Registered User regular
    That's not even the worst I've read. He should read some Lensman if he really wants to get some ire up.

  • EddyEddy Gengar the Bittersweet Registered User regular
    I'm thinking of picking up Mason & Dixon by Pynchon because I'm finally ready to tackle bullshit old-timey eye-dialect and that seems like a super interesting idea for a book

    Has anyone read that book or is there a better latter-day Pynchon recommendation

    Inherent Vice looks yucky

    “Even as a gengar she was lovely.” ― Ovid, Metamorphoses
  • knitdanknitdan Oh no Too much hunnyRegistered User regular
    Maybe 10 years or so back, I read about 100 pages before I got bored and dropped it which I almost never do with books. Don’t remember anything at all about it.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Okay how many quantum con artists are there

  • chrono_travellerchrono_traveller Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Okay how many quantum con artists are there

    You can never be certain because the more accurately you know the number, the less accurate you know how fast its changing. /strainedphysicsjoke

    The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it. ~ Terry Pratchett

    George R. R. Martin is not your bitch. ~ Neil Gaiman
    BrodyKreutzQuidhtmwanderingcredeikiV1mCouscousRchanen
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    edited March 7
    Due to my eReader still being out for replacement (I'm happy Kobo offered me a free replacement given that the cause of breakage was toddler related but it's not a quick process) I've had to read physical books again. I'm sure I remember missing them when I first changed to an eReader but now I find them awkward and frustrating.

    Anyhow, part of the problem is needing to acquire physical books and so finding myself in the upsettingly small fiction section at the local Tesco or WHSmith. The best I could do at first was Birdbox by somebody or other. I'd recently seen the film on Netflix and really enjoyed it so I thought I'd give it a whirl. It left me thinking about Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro. Not for any plot or stylistic connection but just how in both cases you have a book that is fairly good being rendered redundant by a vastly superior retelling in another medium.

    It's almost frustrating that the two versions exist in differing media as it means that with a couple more drafts or the right help from somebody else the book could have been significantly better. The film takes the same general story and hammers out a much stronger plot structure.

    I was prepared for this to be the other way round given the challenge of making a film where everybody has to keep their eyes closed. But there we are.

    Now we play the terrible game where I have to hope that my next book arrives in the post today and doesn't end up in a parcel collection office. It's The Western Wind by Samantha Harvey which has been getting very good press so I have high hopes

    Mojo_Jojo on
    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
    DevoutlyApathetic
  • KrathoonKrathoon Registered User regular
    edited March 7
    Deleted post

    Krathoon on
  • KrathoonKrathoon Registered User regular
    edited March 7
    Deleted post

    Krathoon on
  • BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising Odds Registered User, Moderator mod
    @Krathoon no, wrong thread.

  • KrathoonKrathoon Registered User regular
    Oh. Sorry.

  • CoinageCoinage The Naming of Cats is a difficult matter Registered User regular
    There was an actual woman on the ship in Rendezvous with Rama, though the sequels with Gentry Lee were more than a bit questionable with the weird sex stuff

    s586cu2r93hr.gif
  • EchoEcho Moderator mod
    Ooh, nice sale. This was one of my favorite books of 2018.

    Echo wrote: »
    Let they who have not posted about their balls in the wrong thread cast the first stone.
    m!ttensA Dabble Of Theloniuschrono_travellershrykeredxFuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudSummaryJudgmentPailryderLeumasWhiteAsthariel
  • m!ttensm!ttens Registered User regular
    Children of Time was fantastic and I heartily recommend it, especially for $2

    redxFuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudAntoshkaLeumasWhite
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud bear with us as we do some "rebranding" Registered User regular
    Children of Time was very very good! If you liked it, I recommend Semiosis by Sue Burke.

    redxMahnmut
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    Yay, The Western Wind arrived. Despite the box being slightly larger than my letterbox the hero from Royalmail got it through. Checkmate atheists.
    Children of Time was very very good! If you liked it, I recommend Semiosis by Sue Burke.

    Noted

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
    Quid
  • CroakerBCCroakerBC YorkRegistered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Yay, The Western Wind arrived. Despite the box being slightly larger than my letterbox the hero from Royalmail got it through. Checkmate atheists.
    Children of Time was very very good! If you liked it, I recommend Semiosis by Sue Burke.

    Noted

    I feel I have to shout out that there's a sequel, Children of Ruin coming out in May.

    BrodyFuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudAiserouAntoshka
  • credeikicredeiki Registered User regular
    edited March 7
    My take is that Children of Time was 50% excellent (everything about the spiders) and 50% boring (everything that wasn't about spiders). Still, on the balance, worth reading. But I can't call it very good because to me a good chunk of the book read as uncompelling filler.

    Also: I've finally gotten around to the third book in the orogeny series by NK Jemisin. It is maybe the best one? It's certainly not like other trilogies where the third book is phoned in or just counts on playing on your affections for characters from previous books while it just sort of wraps things up. It is really emotionally intense and I have to take it a chapter at a time. What makes it so intense, I think, is that the characters are now overtly discussing genocide and oppression, instead of those factors being a constant in their lives, but also something that they actively repress a lot of feelings about and aren't able to talk about with anyone (which was stressful to read about as well, but not quite as intense--or rather, there were these outbursts of acute intensity but they were mixed in with sections on survivalism fiction, worldbuilding, etc)
    The third book is making me upwardly revise my opinion of the first two, which is unusual for me; usually when I look back at a book I decide I like it less than I did originally, not more.

    credeiki on
    Steam, LoL: credeiki
    air-photos.tumblr.com
    BrodyMahnmutFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud
  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    Was this the one where the spiders drive spider cars or the one where spiders evolve because of human meddling?

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
    Powerpuppies
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Quantum Thief is... okay? About halfway through and has lots of neat ideas but it also kinda feels all over the place. Having just read Quantum Magician the setting also feels a bit redundant.

  • Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo But do you really believe him? Registered User regular
    credeiki wrote: »
    Also: I've finally gotten around to the third book in the orogeny series by NK Jemisin. It is maybe the best one? It's certainly not like other trilogies where the third book is phoned in or just counts on playing on your affections for characters from previous books while it just sort of wraps things up. It is really emotionally intense and I have to take it a chapter at a time. What makes it so intense, I think, is that the characters are now overtly discussing genocide and oppression, instead of those factors being a constant in their lives, but also something that they actively repress a lot of feelings about and aren't able to talk about with anyone (which was stressful to read about as well, but not quite as intense--or rather, there were these outbursts of acute intensity but they were mixed in with sections on survivalism fiction, worldbuilding, etc)
    The third book is making me upwardly revise my opinion of the first two, which is unusual for me; usually when I look back at a book I decide I like it less than I did originally, not more.
    This is interesting. I found the first 80% of the first book was excellent and the rest was worse to the point where I only read the final book out of a misplaced sense of duty.

    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
    AresProphet
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Was this the one where the spiders drive spider cars or the one where spiders evolve because of human meddling?

    Spiders evolve because human meddling.

    I agree mostly with Credit's assesment, although I would give it 50% awesome, 25% alright, and 25% meh. That said, I'm excited to see where a sequel might go.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson
    PailryderSeptus
  • CroakerBCCroakerBC YorkRegistered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Mojo_Jojo wrote: »
    Was this the one where the spiders drive spider cars or the one where spiders evolve because of human meddling?

    Spiders evolve because human meddling.

    I agree mostly with Credit's assesment, although I would give it 50% awesome, 25% alright, and 25% meh. That said, I'm excited to see where a sequel might go.

    Ask again later (I coincidentally opened my post, and, er, here we are).

    Also my level of excitement at the arrival of a new K.J. Parker book is....very high. Mind you, I still haven't quite forgiven them for making me read Two of Swords in something like 18 sections at 99p each and then releasing them as two collections for £4 each. But still. Always so weird and good.

  • knitdanknitdan Oh no Too much hunnyRegistered User regular
    Started Black Leopard, Red Wolf. It feels almost Gene Wolfian in the way it combines the familiar and the unfamiliar. In the way it makes me feel like I’m missing something, like there’s a grand allegory below the surface that I’m too stupid to understand.

    Or maybe it’s just that it’s set in a culture I’m wholly unfamiliar with.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
    CroakerBCDronus86skippydumptruck
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    I've been trying to read The Last Argument of Kings, and it just feels really boring to me. Or maybe boring is the wrong word, but either way its been just a struggle to keep reading, and I think I might just give up.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson
  • V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    I've been trying to read The Last Argument of Kings, and it just feels really boring to me. Or maybe boring is the wrong word, but either way its been just a struggle to keep reading, and I think I might just give up.

    The 3 following standalones are a fair bit better IMO. But you won't get the most of out them, especially Red Country if you don't finish the original 3. If Abercrombie's style just doesn't grab you then stop.

  • knitdanknitdan Oh no Too much hunnyRegistered User regular
    If it’s not grabbing you just drop it. It doesn’t get better. He’s a one trick pony and it’s not even that great a trick.

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
    Dronus86Mojo_Jojo
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    I've been trying to read The Last Argument of Kings, and it just feels really boring to me. Or maybe boring is the wrong word, but either way its been just a struggle to keep reading, and I think I might just give up.

    It's hard to tell because I'm not sure what specifically is bugging you about it, but if you've made it to Last Argument of Kings and still aren't feeling it, then it's probably just not for you. By that point a lot of the rough edges of the first two books and the structure that they need to set up for the 3rd volume to work are over with and those are usually the biggest thing tripping people up about The First Law.

    But again, it really depends a lot on what's bugging you. Is it LAoK in particular? Is it just that it hasn't ever grabbed you and you are finally giving up? Hard to say either way without knowing.

    knitdan wrote: »
    If it’s not grabbing you just drop it. It doesn’t get better. He’s a one trick pony and it’s not even that great a trick.

    Nah. He's nothing like a one-trick pony and there's plenty of interesting things going on in his works. LAoK itself is just fantastic in how it pulls the series together in unconventional ways.

    PailryderTarantioA Dabble Of Thelonius
This discussion has been closed.