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Router might be dying...looking for recommendations!

NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade UsernameRegistered User regular
So this is a two-part question...I've had this router for a few years now (it's been at least 3 years, I think. I can't remember where I got it, I think a friend might've given it to me like 4 years ago), and a month ago it suddenly started to have regular issues with the wireless signal. My wired signal still seems to be completely fine, but the wireless signal will now die for a few seconds, multiple times throughout the day.

I've read that routers generally only last for about 3-5 years on average before they start to die, is that accurate?

Since absolutely nothing has changed with my internet setup or any of my hardware, I'm assuming the router is in fact dying. Also, looking it up now, it seems like it might've not been the best router to begin with? :razz: If you guys have any recommendations on a replacement, that would be great! I'm not exactly sure what parameters to look for.

Posts

  • dporowskidporowski Registered User regular
    So this is a two-part question...I've had this router for a few years now (it's been at least 3 years, I think. I can't remember where I got it, I think a friend might've given it to me like 4 years ago), and a month ago it suddenly started to have regular issues with the wireless signal. My wired signal still seems to be completely fine, but the wireless signal will now die for a few seconds, multiple times throughout the day.

    I've read that routers generally only last for about 3-5 years on average before they start to die, is that accurate?

    Since absolutely nothing has changed with my internet setup or any of my hardware, I'm assuming the router is in fact dying. Also, looking it up now, it seems like it might've not been the best router to begin with? :razz: If you guys have any recommendations on a replacement, that would be great! I'm not exactly sure what parameters to look for.

    I am an incredibly lazy human, do not wish to tinker, and my needs are "the wifi, it goes good". I absolutely love my Google wifi puck. Only one, since I don't need to mesh, but if you do that's neato too. Seriously, I set it up, plugged it in, and I don't think I've touched it since. It's great.

    As for lifespan, eeeeh, I get more out of mine (5-8+ or so I think), but I expect if I wanted it to do anything more than "give me wifi and get out of the way" I would have different feelings about it. Custom firmwares, storage, etc.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    How big of a home do you have?

    What are your walls made of?

    Where is your internet connection coming in to your home and are you able to move it if necessary?

    What's your internet speed?

    What's your budget?

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    ND, what's your budget and what kind of setup do you want? I'm partial to mesh networks right now, but a simple tp-link AC1200 or 1750 router is budget friendly and works well. You probably don't need a mesh if your apt/house is tiny.

    Ladies.
    Shadowfire
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Also, if you're willing to go down the road, check for firmware updates. Also if you have an Android phone, get the Wifi Analyzer app and see if another network is interfering with your signal (and then you can change channels to try to free it up).

    Simple troubleshoot: does the wifi get any more reliable if you point a small fan at your router's housing? (I'm wondering if the wifi chip is starting to overheat, for whatever reason, or may be a bit dusty and is holding heat more than it would normally)

    ----
    Take the recommendations from others if you want to replace it.

  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Also, if you're willing to go down the road, check for firmware updates. Also if you have an Android phone, get the Wifi Analyzer app and see if another network is interfering with your signal (and then you can change channels to try to free it up).

    Simple troubleshoot: does the wifi get any more reliable if you point a small fan at your router's housing? (I'm wondering if the wifi chip is starting to overheat, for whatever reason, or may be a bit dusty and is holding heat more than it would normally)

    ----
    Take the recommendations from others if you want to replace it.

    That N300 was outdated when NightDragon got it. I'd replace it for security reasons alone, never mind that it's a wireless-N router.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    bowen
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    The cheap tp-link router is like $40, that's a fantastic deal.

    Ladies.
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    I did not notice that point. Yes, get a AC router and enjoy your extra throughput!

  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    How big of a home do you have?

    What are your walls made of?

    Where is your internet connection coming in to your home and are you able to move it if necessary?

    What's your internet speed?

    What's your budget?


    Some particulars of my living space change frequently, because I tend to move every 1-2 years. I have noticed in my current place (a 2-bedroom apartment) that the router signal can barely reach my bedroom from the office (the 2nd bedroom), which is a bit of a bummer. There's a chance I'll live in a house within the next year or two though, so if that could be taken into account too that'd be great!

    I tend to go for speeds of 150 Mbps or lower. Budget is $100 or thereabouts.
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    That N300 was outdated when NightDragon got it. I'd replace it for security reasons alone, never mind that it's a wireless-N router.

    Just curious, what makes this router less secure? Do more modern routers have a stronger type of security they use?

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited March 23
    WPA was found to have some security holes similar to WEP, so WPA2 hit the markets not too long ago.

    E: ... not too long ago being like 2008 gosh dang where did the time go?

    bowen on
    Ladies.
    ShadowfireLD50
  • thatassemblyguythatassemblyguy RESIST. Registered User regular
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    How big of a home do you have?

    What are your walls made of?

    Where is your internet connection coming in to your home and are you able to move it if necessary?

    What's your internet speed?

    What's your budget?


    Some particulars of my living space change frequently, because I tend to move every 1-2 years. I have noticed in my current place (a 2-bedroom apartment) that the router signal can barely reach my bedroom from the office (the 2nd bedroom), which is a bit of a bummer. There's a chance I'll live in a house within the next year or two though, so if that could be taken into account too that'd be great!

    I tend to go for speeds of 150 Mbps or lower. Budget is $100 or thereabouts.
    Shadowfire wrote: »
    That N300 was outdated when NightDragon got it. I'd replace it for security reasons alone, never mind that it's a wireless-N router.

    Just curious, what makes this router less secure? Do more modern routers have a stronger type of security they use?

    Lack of firmware updates is the #2 security issue. Not changing the default password is #1.
    —————
    If you don’t mind Google collecting all of your internet traffic, then I second the Google puck.

    If you don’t mind Amazon collecting all of your internet traffic, then go with an eero.

    If you don’t mind having a Chinese Government backdoor in the router, then TP-Link are good.

    If y’all feel like spending some above budget cash and manually setting up your own WiFi controller, Netgate pfSense+UniFi AP.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    tp-link usually can be flashed pretty easily with a 3rd party firmware too, if you're worried about the chinese

    Ladies.
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