This Thread Will Go Down in [History]

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  • MorivethMoriveth BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWN BREAKDOWNRegistered User regular
    I wish I could have been paid to be some rich dude's garden hermit

    Depressperado
  • MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Gundi wrote: »
    man that must been a fun time

    I wish I was born back when you could just live as a "scholar" or "philosopher" and just make shit up like fact.

    I wish more I was born in the era of mad science, like, "we just figured out electricity and machining and engines and shit, let's see what we can slap together!" science

    Yeah but this is also when people didn't understand the fun aspects of things like fluorine

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    Depressperado
  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    Would You Survive In a Different Historical Era? 10:54

    Ever wonder how you'd fare in a different time period? Today, we're exploring the most lethal dangers people from around the world faced from 14th century Florence to 1st century ancient Rome. Brush up on your survival skills and let us know how well you think you'd do if alive way back when.

    Maybe not the tightest channel in terms of fact checking but I have been watching a lot of the videos recently because they are pretty entertaining

    What I've learnt is that the past sucks and if I have a time machine I would use it to go forward instead

    Peas on
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  • MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Time machine? Set course for the after Nixon years. I have a Fox to hunt.

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    Xaquin
  • HefflingHeffling No Pic EverRegistered User regular
    mine was The Communist Manifesto (I wanted The Red Scare but it was taken :( )

    he was created by an underground Soviet Union to be a counterpart to Statesman. but like all Communists, he turned to evil and petty supercrimes

    Is a petty supercrime like if The Flash were to jaywalk at every street in central city in a few seconds?

    If a movement doesn't have someone that can sit down opposite those in a position of power and strike a deal, how can that movement achieve success?
    Depressperado
  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    edited November 2019
    Only golden age Flash
    Otherwise it's Barrywalking/Wallywalking/Bartwalking

    Straightzi on
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  • BrainleechBrainleech 機知に富んだコメントはここにあります Registered User regular
    Straightzi wrote: »
    Only golden age Flash
    Otherwise it's Barrywalking/Wallywalking/Bartwalking

    Flash Gordon?

  • The Cow KingThe Cow King scuz me ur under dog arrest Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    i'm sorry I just learned a scientist lit a cigarette off of a nuclear explosion through a parabolic mirror and like

    fuck that is one of the more excessive apocalyptic way to go out

    fallout 3's "lol lets nuke a city" might have been worth it if I coulda lit a joint off it

    The Cow King on
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  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    Goddamn that's so sick

    future so bright you gotta wear shades, baby

    The Cow King
  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    Some people have an existential crisis and their eyes sink into their skull and they quote the Bhagavad Gita some people go smoke em if you got em

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  • GundiGundi Serious Bismuth Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    how did I never know was St. Augustine was a Amazigh (berber) north african from modern day algeria?

    i mean i know the answer is racism but still wow one of the seminal figures on christian theology was from algeria. (and yeah I know north africa was an early center of Christianity but it is amazing how much that is glossed over in general overviews of early christian history.)

    Gundi on
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  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    Gundi wrote: »
    how did I never know was St. Augustine was a Amazigh (berber) north african from modern day algeria.

    i mean i know the answer is racism but still wow one of the seminal figures on christian theology was from algeria. (and yeah I know north africa was an early center of Christianity but it is amazing how much that is glossed over in general overviews of early christian history.)

    Most early church figures are Mediterranean and some are East African

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  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    Santa was from Anatolia
    St Christopher was from Canaan
    St Jerome was from modern day Slovenia

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  • JedocJedoc Once to start a new life and once just to start a fireRegistered User regular
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    Pictured: a Berber gentleman, probably.

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  • GundiGundi Serious Bismuth Registered User regular
    it would be fun if there were to be an artistic movement that was "classical and renaissance style artwork but realistic"

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  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    Santa punched a heretic in the face at Nicea

    Kayne Red Robe
  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    Big whoop burn a couple thousand heretics alive and instigate an antisemitic pogrom and get back to me Santa

    Hobnail on
  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    The Incredible Story of America's First Pop Star 12:06

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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    17th Century Ninja Explains How To Be A Ninja // The Bansenshūkai // Japanese Primary Source 4:13


    Straight from the pages of the ultimate Ninja manual - The 17th century Bansenshūkai (萬川集海 - translated as 'All Rivers Merge into the Sea'), here we have a passage of advice for lords on the ten key aspects they should search for when hiring a prospective Ninja/Shinobi.

    Compiled in 1676 by Fujibayashi Yasutake, The Bansenshūkai is an exhaustive guide to many of the key moral ideas that underpin the Ninja, as well as practical advice on how to execute various strategies - from castle infiltration to haircuts.

    Thanks to Antony Cummins for allowing us to use his excellent translation -


    I can do it but I don't wanna

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  • JedocJedoc Once to start a new life and once just to start a fireRegistered User regular
    Seems like a long video just to say "flip out and kill people."

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  • JayKaosJayKaos Registered User regular
    Jedoc wrote: »
    Seems like a long video just to say "flip out and kill people."

    Well yeah, you need the full technique repertoire ready or you're just the guy that flipped out, tried to run up a wall, and broke his ankle falling three feet.

    Steam | SW-0844-0908-6004 and my Switch code
    Peas
  • JedocJedoc Once to start a new life and once just to start a fireRegistered User regular
    I just finished reading a pretty good book about Leonardo da Vinci. There's a lot of neat stuff about his art and engineering, and every ten pages there will be a story like "and then he painstakingly mapped out the entire human circulatory system to he could more accurately draw the forehead veins in a concept sketch for a project that he never really went anywhere on, and then he never bothered to publish it so nobody knew how blood worked until hundreds of years later." So that's always fun.

    My main takeaway is that Leonardo and Michelangelo really didn't get along at all. They were both gay, but Leonardo didn't really care about the church and basically just lived his life as a happy gay dude, while Michelangelo was hella churched and hated being attracted to men and it just led to him being shitty and mad all the time. And so you get the feeling that Michelangelo thought they were in this lifelong feud of seething mutual hatred, and Leonardo would just pop up every now and then and be like "Yo, man, those naked dudes you just painted look like a bunch of bags of walnuts. Suck less, I guess" and then just piss off to Florence to dodge the pope's phone calls and invent turbulent flow theory.

    Anyway, I would like Jeff Bridges to do a movie about Leonardo with no attempt at an accent, this concludes my TED talk.

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  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Best cinematic depiction of Leonardo da Vinci was in Ever After.

    JedocDee Kae
  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    I mean he's right they do look like walnut bags

    tynicDisruptedCapitalistShorty
  • JedocJedoc Once to start a new life and once just to start a fireRegistered User regular
    Hang on, I just double-checked the quote, and he said they looked like sacks of walnuts. Much better.

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  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    I have to assume that Michelangelo had a very specific type and that is why all of his people look like that

  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Jedoc wrote: »
    Hang on, I just double-checked the quote, and he said they looked like sacks of walnuts. Much better.

    Clive James famously called Arnold Schwarzenegger a "condom full of walnuts", I can only assume it was an homage.

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  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    Jedoc wrote: »
    I just finished reading a pretty good book about Leonardo da Vinci. There's a lot of neat stuff about his art and engineering, and every ten pages there will be a story like "and then he painstakingly mapped out the entire human circulatory system to he could more accurately draw the forehead veins in a concept sketch for a project that he never really went anywhere on, and then he never bothered to publish it so nobody knew how blood worked until hundreds of years later." So that's always fun.

    My main takeaway is that Leonardo and Michelangelo really didn't get along at all. They were both gay, but Leonardo didn't really care about the church and basically just lived his life as a happy gay dude, while Michelangelo was hella churched and hated being attracted to men and it just led to him being shitty and mad all the time. And so you get the feeling that Michelangelo thought they were in this lifelong feud of seething mutual hatred, and Leonardo would just pop up every now and then and be like "Yo, man, those naked dudes you just painted look like a bunch of bags of walnuts. Suck less, I guess" and then just piss off to Florence to dodge the pope's phone calls and invent turbulent flow theory.

    Anyway, I would like Jeff Bridges to do a movie about Leonardo with no attempt at an accent, this concludes my TED talk.

    michaelangelo was a notorious asshole and diva

    leo was (and I really hate being an armchair psych but a lot of modern doctors tend to agree) pretty onto the spectrum and possibly had aspergers, so he just really couldn't relate well to people at all


    they were both outrageous geniuses whose breadth of work will likely never be rivaled

    EDIT: also leo wasn't really happy being gay, as it was kinda a capital offense, also the whole being real bad at relating to other people thing

    PiptheFair on
  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    He could comfort himself by being extremely fucking yoked at least

    Kwoaru
  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    I've always liked this Da Vinci drawing of a mercenary captain

    CHMVgsI.jpg

    Like that is some wild lookin shit that dude is wearing, most of the plate mail in Game of Thrones looked like pots and pans

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  • PiptheFairPiptheFair Registered User regular
    I've always liked this Da Vinci drawing of a mercenary captain

    CHMVgsI.jpg

    Like that is some wild lookin shit that dude is wearing, most of the plate mail in Game of Thrones looked like pots and pans

    game of thrones also bought into the fallacy that everything was brown and everybody nobles were covered in shit

    people wore bright colors and cared about their appearance, also people bathed at least once a week and washed their hands, feet and face daily

    at least until the second plague and the church started saying public baths were the cause of the spread

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  • HobnailHobnail Registered User regular
    Which isnt to say there were no shit covered people dressed in drab I grew up with drab shit covered people

  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    I hereby claim any legit shit covered peon as a direct ancestor.

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  • DisruptedCapitalistDisruptedCapitalist rugged, weathered Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    I hereby claim any legit shit covered peon as a direct ancestor.
    holygrail.jpg

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  • GundiGundi Serious Bismuth Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    So here's a bit of relatively local history stuff. Really just a history anecdote that struck a chord with me.

    Anybody familiar with America's history with Native American/US relations has probably heard of the Cherokee. Cherokee isn't actually their own name for themselves, but rather one of the names that many other indigenous people used for them. It's exact etymology is lost to time, but a common theory is it derives from an Iroquian expression that translates to "people of the caves."

    The reason why many people think this a plausible origin is because caves are traditionally a really big deal in Cherokee belief systems. To oversimplify as a stupid colonist, caves serve as a boundary between the mundane and metaphysical. Because of this they often played an important ceremonial role and might often be ordained with elaborate cave art.

    In the past several decades dozens of these caves have been found in the traditional Cherokee homeland (spanning parts of the Carolinas, Tennessee, and Georgia) and researchers have been extremely interested in studying them. The time frame of the art's creation in any given cave is often enormous. The oldest drawings in some of the caves go back almost eight thousand years. It's impossible to determine the authors of the oldest art. They may have been cherokee or their ancestors or another culture which was displaced at some point by the Cherokee. But the youngest carvings in the cave? Well those are definitely cherokee. Because not only is there art, but also writing to go with it.
    2312432695_c774e1fd09_z.jpg
    That is, very old, and very archaic Cherokee dating from the late 18th, early 19th century.

    Even with Cherokee assistance, it's been very difficult to translate. For a comparison imagine as a modern English reader trying to parse together old English texts from scratch. Still over time the Cherokee researchers persisted and they were astounded by what they found. The majority of the writings detail sacred and ancient Cherokee rituals and customs. And like real secret stuff. Apparently many of the Cherokee who deciphered the writing were taken aback that such important cultural secrets were written where potentially anyone could see them. It seems as if in the decades before the Trail of Tears, many cherokee were aware of how dire their situation was becoming and so decided to create what was might be called a cultural encycopedia hidden in their most sacred places to preserve their culture in the face of potential annihilation. It goes over everything from their syllabary and basic writing and grammer instructions to their (previously only oral) history, societal and administrative practices, instructions for how to perform sacred rites, etc.

    There is also a second group of cave texts which did not fall into this category which confused the researchers who first found them. The writing was mirrored. The researchers wondered if this was an attempt to deliberately obfuscate researches until several Cherokee hit upon the actual reasoning. They weren't meant to be read by people looking at them in the cave. They were meant to be read by people, or beings, on the other side of the cave. In the stone. When I read about this it was this final bit that really struck me. There's something deeply moving to me there.

    Most of the caves' locations have been kept secret to as to try and avoid vandalism, but some of the older discovered ones are open to the public like Manitou cave. That being said much of the cave art was intentionally put in extremely hard to reach places so it can be quite dangerous to get to.

    Gundi on
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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    Byzantine Empire Anime Opening 1:29

    Peas on
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  • valhalla130valhalla130 13 Dark Shield Perceives the GodsRegistered User regular
    Gundi wrote: »
    So here's a bit of relatively local history stuff. Really just a history anecdote that struck a chord with me.

    Anybody familiar with America's history with Native American/US relations has probably heard of the Cherokee. Cherokee isn't actually their own name for themselves, but rather one of the names that many other indigenous people used for them. It's exact etymology is lost to time, but a common theory is it derives from an Iroquian expression that translates to "people of the caves."

    The reason why many people think this a plausible origin is because caves are traditionally a really big deal in Cherokee belief systems. To oversimplify as a stupid colonist, caves serve as a boundary between the mundane and metaphysical. Because of this they often played an important ceremonial role and might often be ordained with elaborate cave art.

    In the past several decades dozens of these caves have been found in the traditional Cherokee homeland (spanning parts of the Carolinas, Tennessee, and Georgia) and researchers have been extremely interested in studying them. The time frame of the art's creation in any given cave is often enormous. The oldest drawings in some of the caves go back almost eight thousand years. It's impossible to determine the authors of the oldest art. They may have been cherokee or their ancestors or another culture which was displaced at some point by the Cherokee. But the youngest carvings in the cave? Well those are definitely cherokee. Because not only is there art, but also writing to go with it.
    2312432695_c774e1fd09_z.jpg
    That is, very old, and very archaic Cherokee dating from the late 18th, early 19th century.

    Even with Cherokee assistance, it's been very difficult to translate. For a comparison imagine as a modern English reader trying to parse together old English texts from scratch. Still over time the Cherokee researchers persisted and they were astounded by what they found. The majority of the writings detail sacred and ancient Cherokee rituals and customs. And like real secret stuff. Apparently many of the Cherokee who deciphered the writing were taken aback that such important cultural secrets were written where potentially anyone could see them. It seems as if in the decades before the Trail of Tears, many cherokee were aware of how dire their situation was becoming and so decided to create what was might be called a cultural encycopedia hidden in their most sacred places to preserve their culture in the face of potential annihilation. It goes over everything from their syllabary and basic writing and grammer instructions to their (previously only oral) history, societal and administrative practices, instructions for how to perform sacred rites, etc.

    There is also a second group of cave texts which did not fall into this category which confused the researchers who first found them. The writing was mirrored. The researchers wondered if this was an attempt to deliberately obfuscate researches until several Cherokee hit upon the actual reasoning. They weren't meant to be read by people looking at them in the cave. They were meant to be read by people, or beings, on the other side of the cave. In the stone. When I read about this it was this final bit that really struck me. There's something deeply moving to me there.

    Most of the caves' locations have been kept secret to as to try and avoid vandalism, but some of the older discovered ones are open to the public like Manitou cave. That being said much of the cave art was intentionally put in extremely hard to reach places so it can be quite dangerous to get to.

    I am super happy about this. The Trail of Tears was something I learned about in school at an early age and the thought that my ancestors didn't completely destroy the Cherokee's culture makes me happy. Thing is, I am aware that had they known about this, they would have destroyed it too. This is a major find and super important.

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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    History's "worst" nun - Theresa A. Yugar 4:46

    Get to know the life of Mexican nun, poet and scholar, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, who was censored by the Church for her critical writings.

    --

    Juana Ramírez de Asbaje sat before a panel of prestigious theologians, jurists, and mathematicians. They had been invited to test Juana’s knowledge with the most difficult questions they could muster. But she successfully answered every challenge, from complicated equations to philosophical queries. Who was this impressive woman? Theresa Yugar details the life of the Mexican poet and scholar.

    Lesson by Theresa Yugar, directed by Wow-How Studio.

    Peas on
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  • StraightziStraightzi Here we may reign secure, and in my choice, To reign is worth ambition though in HellRegistered User regular
    I don't know if she beats out Maria Luisa of Sant'Ambrogio della Massima

    tynicDuke 2.0
  • PlatyPlaty Registered User regular
    edited November 2019
    It took me ten years of looking at maps to actually see the fish hook which ancient people thought gave Anglia and England their names

    Platy on
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