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When you have to stay at home, it's time for [BAD FOOD]

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Posts

  • MadicanMadican No face Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    Polaritie wrote: »

    What do you think the jello is made out of?

    Rum ham rum

  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited April 2020
    3clipse wrote: »
    Yeast-risen breads rise barely, if at all, in the oven (to the extent they do, it's the air trapped in the bread expanding), because the yeast rapidly die in the oven and stop producing gas. Baked goods that rise in the oven do so with chemical leavening agents that are more active under heat (baking powder, baking soda).

    How long a proof (and at what temperature) did you do once the yeast was in the dough?

    The recipe I followed says

    Mix everything together
    Leave for 10 minutes
    Knead
    Leave for 10 minutes
    Knead
    Leave for 10 minutes
    Knead
    Leave for 45 minutes
    Shape into a loaf
    Leave for 45 minutes
    Bake

    Yesterday I did it all in the kitchen. Today I put it outside in the sun (under a towel) for the 45 minute bits. I'm not sure what temperature that was, probably about 20°C or a bit more

    Good to know it's not meant to rise in the oven.

    I have just seen some video of bread kneading and my dough looked nothing like theirs. Mine was really sticky and not at all elastic.

    Brovid Hasselsmof on
  • 3clips33clips3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    That's quite a short series of intervals - even for breads using baker's yeast, I would expect a proving step of at least a couple hours at room temperature (or at least an hour in an area that's at least 27 C) where you leave the dough alone. You could consider turning that first 45 minute rest into a 2 hour rest, and the second 45 minute rest into a 1 hour rest, as an initial test.

    Getting proving times exactly right for a given bread recipe is fiddly and experimental because it can be so wildly affected by your individual environment.

    DoodmannPolaritiewebguy20tynicsarukunPeen
  • 3clips33clips3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Regarding dough elasticity, the fashion for most bread tutorials online these days is bread made using a sourdough starter, which handles very differently from bread made with baker's yeast.

  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    I'd recommend to 20 minutes between "kneads" and also to just turn it instead of kneading it every time.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
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  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    edited April 2020
    Doodmann wrote: »
    I'd recommend to 20 minutes between "kneads" and also to just turn it instead of kneading it every time.

    Yeah, last time I did a yeasted bread it was basically one big kneading session at the start, rise for a couple hours, punch down and turn, rise again, shape and bake. That was quite a while ago so I'm probably misremembering something.

    Most of my baking is for desserts, with the occasional batch of biscuits to go with dinner.

    Polaritie on
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    Glal
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Okay, thanks for the tips guys. I am determined to get this right. If I can physically consume enough bread to keep up with practising.

    3clips3Polaritiebowenwebguy20JedocTynnanDoodmannchromdomBahamutZEROCommander ZoomTofystedethtynicTNTroopersarukunSorceLabelThe Escape Goat
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I really need to get in on all this bread making.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
    mrpakuwebguy20sarukunSorceThe Escape Goat
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    edited April 2020
    Oh uh further dumb question. By "turning" the dough do you mean literally just turning it over?
    bowen wrote: »
    I really need to get in on all this bread making.

    I feel like such a hipster arsehole for suddenly deciding to do this now, but whatever.

    Brovid Hasselsmof on
    DoodmannBahamutZEROCouscous
  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    Oh uh further dumb question. By "turning" the dough do you mean literally just turning it over?
    bowen wrote: »
    I really need to get in on all this bread making.

    I feel like such a hipster arsehole for suddenly deciding to do this now, but whatever.

    If it's what I'm thinking, yeah... that's about all there is, unless the recipe calls for punching it down (which is... basically push your fist in a ways, fold the sides to the middle, and THEN flip it over - find a video or diagram on this one).

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  • David_TDavid_T A fashion yes-man is no good to me. Copenhagen, DenmarkRegistered User regular
    Now's the perfect time to get into breadmaking.

    I have to tell myself.

    steam_sig.png
  • PolaritiePolaritie Sleepy Registered User regular
    Yeah, some of my family members have been going heavy on the baking and now I want to bake a bit extra.

    So uh... brownies tonight, I think. :D.

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    PSN: AbEntropy
  • 3clips33clips3 I will build a labyrinth to house the cheese Registered User regular
    Listen, it's never a bad idea to learn how to make bread.

    XaquinTynnanwebguy20PolaritieCommander ZoomTofystedethsarukunSorcePeenThe Escape Goatlonelyahava
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    Oh uh further dumb question. By "turning" the dough do you mean literally just turning it over?
    bowen wrote: »
    I really need to get in on all this bread making.

    I feel like such a hipster arsehole for suddenly deciding to do this now, but whatever.

    yeah I used to rest it in a plastic bucket, and the turn was literally getting your hand a little wet scooping under the blob and flipping it over in the bucket.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    Torchlight | Steam | ART
    Brovid Hasselsmof
  • Ashaman42Ashaman42 Registered User regular
    @Uriel You absolute gem! That was delicious!!

    s63v88rhnk3q.jpg

    I think based on our taste that reducing the salt was the right choice but that was fantastic. I went with tomato puree one half and pesto the other with chorizo, mozzarella, cheddar and 'italian' seasoning over both halves. My partner went with mixed tomato puree and pesto with parma ham, both cheeses and seasoning.

    We will definitely do that again. Not every week like someone I know because it is more faff and more expensive than a shop bought sling in the oven pizza but every few weeks we will make our own.

    David_TJedocTallahasseeriel3clips3Commander ZoomDonovan PuppyfuckerNaphtaliXaquinPeasTNTroopermrpakuBahamutZERObalerbowerPsykomaTynnanDirtyboySorceMichaelLCSporkAndrewPeenThe Escape Goat
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    Okay, thanks for the tips guys. I am determined to get this right. If I can physically consume enough bread to keep up with practising.

    Shipping might be a bear, but I will eat all the homemade practice loaves.

    steam_sig.png
  • TofystedethTofystedeth veni, veneri, vamoosi Registered User regular
    azith28 wrote: »
    Dirtyboy wrote: »

    I'd say to get the Gillotine ready for that Delivery person.

    Absolutely not. That's straight up just an un-cut bun with nothing in it, to see that the delivery person would have had to unwrap the order. You do not want the delivery person unwrapping your order.

    They should call the restaurant and text pictures to the manager, if the restaurant doesn't suck they will send them out another meal free of charge and a voucher for a free meal in future.

    Yeah, like, if I were the delivery person I'm familiar enough with the heft of a schlotzkys sandwich that I'd maybe ask if the whole order was there, but beyond that it's totally not their responsibility to ensure the restaurant remembered to actually make food and put it in the bag.

    steam_sig.png
    Commander ZoomLaOsDouglasDanger
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2020
    @Brovid Hasselsmof we got a lot of bread discussion going on in the cooking thread as well right now
    https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/222495/it-is-2019-let-us-all-huddle-around-the-cooking-fire-and-reminisce#latest

    casual inspection and from your description, my guess is that the gluten strands haven't formed properly which means do either much more kneading or wait for much more time in that first long pause. Since I am a lazy ass, I would always recommend the longer time option.

    tynic on
    webguy20Doodmann3clips3bowenTynnanBrovid Hasselsmof
  • #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    #pipe wrote: »
    Anyway here's a piece of bread making kit that just arrived today I'm super excited to use

    lnnrxbb64a6e.jpg

    mz206s8gl4ia.jpg
    3da6616pfiqm.jpg

    JedocTallahasseerielwebguy20StiltsCommander ZoomXaquinBahamutZERODirtyboymrpakusarukunTNTrooperSorceTynnanMichaelLCKetarLaOsgodmodeLabelSporkAndrewDonovan PuppyfuckerDouglasDangerPeenchromdomUbikThe Escape GoatlonelyahavaNaphtaliTofystedethThegreatcow
  • JedocJedoc Bringing the past to life so we can beat it to death with a shovelRegistered User regular
    Hell yeah. The perfectly symmetrical sandwich of a true scholar.

    GDdCWMm.jpg
    #pipeCommander ZoomSporkAndrewDouglasDanger
  • BrainleechBrainleech 機知に富んだコメントはここにあります Registered User regular


    BahamutZEROsarukunDouglasDanger
  • BahamutZEROBahamutZERO Registered User regular
    nyumnyumnyum

    BahamutZERO.gif
  • DirtyboyDirtyboy Registered User regular
    PINEAPPLE FRIED RICE in PARROT BIRD Pineapple Bowl | KIDS WILL LOVE IT! (14 mins)

    sarukunDouglasDanger
  • sarukunsarukun RIESLING OCEANRegistered User regular
    edited April 2020
    Bread 2.0
    hmuy0va8vpm2.jpg

    It definitely rose more than yesterday, prior to going in the oven, and then barely rose at all while baking. It still doesn't look quite right, it's a bit more brown but again I left it in for an extra 10-15 minutes. It's still pretty dense and chewy. Really nice crust though.

    This is really frustrating, it's such a simple process and I dunno what I am doing wrong.

    Well, for starters, thinking that baking is a simple process.

    Baking is basically sorcery compared to other kinds of cooking, and the only real way to get good at it, not unlike learning a language, is to fuck up repeatedly and often until you develop your "bread sense" and can tell how old a piece of loaf of pastry is just by smelling it.

    Keep at it. If you're going to change a step in the process, I highly recommend changing nothing else and try to be as consistent as possible so you can see what the impact of your single change is.
    3clipse wrote: »
    Yeast-risen breads rise barely, if at all, in the oven (to the extent they do, it's the air trapped in the bread expanding), because the yeast rapidly die in the oven and stop producing gas. Baked goods that rise in the oven do so with chemical leavening agents that are more active under heat (baking powder, baking soda).

    How long a proof (and at what temperature) did you do once the yeast was in the dough?

    The recipe I followed says

    Mix everything together
    Leave for 10 minutes
    Knead
    Leave for 10 minutes
    Knead
    Leave for 10 minutes
    Knead
    Leave for 45 minutes
    Shape into a loaf
    Leave for 45 minutes
    Bake

    Yesterday I did it all in the kitchen. Today I put it outside in the sun (under a towel) for the 45 minute bits. I'm not sure what temperature that was, probably about 20°C or a bit more

    Good to know it's not meant to rise in the oven.

    I have just seen some video of bread kneading and my dough looked nothing like theirs. Mine was really sticky and not at all elastic.

    It's possible that there's an imbalance in your ingredients, maybe too much water or not enough flour.

    I threw out previously that maybe you were over-kneading the dough, and although that was kind of a wild guess, it may be the way that you're kneading does have some kind of issue. This is hard to know without watching you knead. Like I said, when I had density issues in the past, it was because I was kneading wrong. Like you, I had dough that seemed overly wet, so I added flour, and then it got kind of crumbly, and then I added water, and added more flour again until I had a dough that seemed okay but was very dense when baked. It wasn't bad, but it definitely wasn't quite right.

    Short of getting a teacher or trying it a bunch more times and maybe watching some youtube videos on kneading, hopefully ones that don't just say "here's how you knead" but also "this is what will happen if you knea this way or that way", I'm not sure what else you even can do.

    sarukun on
  • sarukunsarukun RIESLING OCEANRegistered User regular
    3clipse wrote: »
    Listen, it's never a bad idea to learn how to make bread.

    https://www.achewood.com/index.php?date=06092006

    XaquinCentipede DamascusCommander ZoommrpakuJedocSorceDouglasDangerBrovid HasselsmofThe Escape Goat
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Just watch paul hollywood slapping dough around on a loop.

    Tynnan
  • Banzai5150Banzai5150 Registered User regular
    Remember when blooming your Yeast not to go above 108F or you'll kill it. Whenever I make something with yeast, I use my quick temp thermometer and wait till it's closer to 100 than over.

    1258853.png
    3clips3
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited April 2020
    I don't think I've ever stuck a thermometer near yeast in my life. I don't even usually weigh my ingredients unless I'm doing a new recipe.
    I just use lukewarm or cold water and go with what feels right, and mostly that turns out pretty well. Bread is one of those things you can get really anal retentive about but our ancestors used to make it with hand-pounded flour on hot rocks, it's not all that magical.

    edit: hmm that makes it sound like if the bread goes wrong you must be more inept than an idiot with a hot rock, which is not what I wanted to imply.
    What I was trying to say is that I think if you're starting out baking it's easy to see all these numbers about temperatures and hydration levels and how much you should or shouldn't be kneading, etc, and get really intimidated, when like sarukun says it mostly just comes down to getting a bunch of experience under your belt and trying different things out.

    tynic on
    Tynnan#pipe3clips3LabelsarukunDidgeridoowebguy20
  • #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    It is definitely an experience/feel thing.

    This was the first loaf I'd made in my new Pullman pan and I followed the recipe exactly. Now I know it needs 10 more minutes in my oven. Trial and error. Write everything down.

    3clips3tynicCommander ZoomsarukunJedoc
  • Commander ZoomCommander Zoom Registered User regular
    This week, I made (my own) quesadillas for the first time ever. It took me several tries just to find the right balance of temperature and time to melt the cheese and brown the tortillas without turning the latter into charcoal. I've got it now! But no one starts out just knowing this stuff. We learn by doing.

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  • BrainleechBrainleech 機知に富んだコメントはここにあります Registered User regular
    Banzai5150 wrote: »
    Remember when blooming your Yeast not to go above 108F or you'll kill it. Whenever I make something with yeast, I use my quick temp thermometer and wait till it's closer to 100 than over.

    Still i am stuck with 9 packets of wine yeast and everything that i might trust says it's a higher temp and longer than normal yeast
    Part of me though is willing to wait till yeast reappears in June/July

  • TynnanTynnan seldom correct, never unsure Registered User regular
    edited April 2020
    Brainleech wrote: »
    Banzai5150 wrote: »
    Remember when blooming your Yeast not to go above 108F or you'll kill it. Whenever I make something with yeast, I use my quick temp thermometer and wait till it's closer to 100 than over.

    Still i am stuck with 9 packets of wine yeast and everything that i might trust says it's a higher temp and longer than normal yeast
    Part of me though is willing to wait till yeast reappears in June/July

    If you have a local bodega or corner store, try checking their shelves. There’s one near me that is fully stocked on everything. They don’t seem to have had the same run as grocery supermarkets did.

    Tynnan on
  • PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Realtor Santa ClaritaRegistered User regular
    JKLA's no-knead bread is dead simple and where I started on bread baking. He even did an at-home quarantine version with a Go-Pro on his head.

    Commander ZoomBanzai5150
  • kilnbornkilnborn Registered User regular
    No-knead bread is so imprecise that a scale really isn't needed. The range of hydration that just works is so wide that you can just eyeball it, and get a nice loaf of bread. The no-knead technique has such a high floor that you'll just end up with really good bread every time.

    I just use a ratio of somewhere around 4 cups of AP flour, 1/4 teaspoon of yeast, 1-2 teaspoons of salt, and 2 cups of water. Literally don't care if my 4 cups of flour are consistent. I'll end up with a high hydration dough no matter what.

    tynic
  • sarukunsarukun RIESLING OCEANRegistered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    I don't think I've ever stuck a thermometer near yeast in my life. I don't even usually weigh my ingredients unless I'm doing a new recipe.
    I just use lukewarm or cold water and go with what feels right, and mostly that turns out pretty well. Bread is one of those things you can get really anal retentive about but our ancestors used to make it with hand-pounded flour on hot rocks, it's not all that magical.

    edit: hmm that makes it sound like if the bread goes wrong you must be more inept than an idiot with a hot rock, which is not what I wanted to imply.
    What I was trying to say is that I think if you're starting out baking it's easy to see all these numbers about temperatures and hydration levels and how much you should or shouldn't be kneading, etc, and get really intimidated, when like sarukun says it mostly just comes down to getting a bunch of experience under your belt and trying different things out.

    See! “Bread sense”!

  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    Just watch paul hollywood slapping dough around on a loop.

    lewd

    Centipede Damascuschromdomwebguy20The Escape Goatsarukun
  • Brovid HasselsmofBrovid Hasselsmof [Growling historic on the fury road] Registered User regular
    Well, my sister in law has decided to make bread today, using the bread machine. Somehow this feels like a personal attack.

    SorcePeastynicLabelsarukun
  • JedocJedoc Bringing the past to life so we can beat it to death with a shovelRegistered User regular
    You got this, John Henry.

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  • PeasPeas Registered User regular
    おうちでキャンプ飯 【Kingサーロインステーキ】 StayHome 10:39

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    Sorce
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    I don't think I've ever stuck a thermometer near yeast in my life. I don't even usually weigh my ingredients unless I'm doing a new recipe.
    I just use lukewarm or cold water and go with what feels right, and mostly that turns out pretty well. Bread is one of those things you can get really anal retentive about but our ancestors used to make it with hand-pounded flour on hot rocks, it's not all that magical.

    edit: hmm that makes it sound like if the bread goes wrong you must be more inept than an idiot with a hot rock, which is not what I wanted to imply.
    What I was trying to say is that I think if you're starting out baking it's easy to see all these numbers about temperatures and hydration levels and how much you should or shouldn't be kneading, etc, and get really intimidated, when like sarukun says it mostly just comes down to getting a bunch of experience under your belt and trying different things out.

    To add onto that edit, those ancestors would eat moldy food if they needed to, anything even remotely resembling bread to them was a success and cause of celebration I imagine.

    All these failures at bread I've seen in the like 4 threads that talk about all still look like bread to me, maybe not the perfect loaves I've ever seen, but I'd eat 'em.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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