New shoes

RightfulSinRightfulSin Registered User regular
Any advice on good shoes? For a bit now I have bought the ones from Wal-Mart and am getting a little tired of needing to buy new ones so often. I do a fair bit of walking and I am extremely rough on my shoes, in the sense that the sole (both inner and outer) wear down decently fast. I am size 12.5-13 and usually get the Wide version if available. Also, by fast I mean I am usually going through the pair to where they are worn and a bit uncomfortable to wear in less than 3-4 months. I am not sure if thats common or not. I just hate having to keep buying shoes for my damn feet. Thanks.

"If nothing is impossible, than would it not be impossible to find something that you could not do?" - Me

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  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    edited October 8
    We're going to need a whole lot more details on your use cases to recommend you something. Are you looking for running shoes, dress shoes, sandals? Any shoe will do?

    Shoes are something that price does matter on, typically. A cheap, 30-50 dollar pair will probably wear down in half a year of heavy use. A well made pair costing you $150 might last you a decade with only some cheap repair work. It also depends on what you are doing. Buying fancy shoes if you are often walking through ankle-deep water due to your environment is a bad call, for example.

    Enc on
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  • NoquarNoquar Registered User regular
    I would say go to a running store so they can evaluate your gait. They will be able to record it and provide you with brands and styles that will work for you. Shoes are an area where often there is a reason they are more expensive - this is my opinion as a big guy with big feet.

    EncElvenshaefurlionMugsleyShadowfire
  • RightfulSinRightfulSin Registered User regular
    edited October 8
    Enc wrote: »
    We're going to need a whole lot more details on your use cases to recommend you something. Are you looking for running shoes, dress shoes, sandals? Any shoe will do?

    Need a pair for work shoes and a pair of casual shoes.

    Work shoes that can handle lots of walking outside, it's close to a construction similar job environment. Not running per se, but it involves lots of walking. Casual shoes can be generic shoes to wear while I am not working.

    RightfulSin on
    "If nothing is impossible, than would it not be impossible to find something that you could not do?" - Me
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    What environment are you in? In Florida I can get away with sandals or light canvas shoes for my casuals, somewhere that gets down to 40 or below that wouldn't work.

  • RightfulSinRightfulSin Registered User regular
    SoCal. I got sandals that are fine but am looking for actual shoes come deeper fall and winter time.

    "If nothing is impossible, than would it not be impossible to find something that you could not do?" - Me
  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    For often-outside, mixed weather shoes in a place where its dry, some mid-range dress boots might be a good call. They run on the higher end as a shoe style but they hold together quite well and the leather shouldn't get gummy or moldy in a dry environment like socal. You might want to buy some insoles after getting your gait checked before trying on the shoes and go a size up to accommodate them, that way when your shoes get "flat" and you feel like you no longer have support you just replace the insole for 15 bucks instead of the whole shoe. Leather is usually the best bet when you are walking through shoes often and need to stay dressy.

    For casuals, I almost always go cheap because I have a habit of doing stupid shit with friends to ruin them. I usually buy several pair of canvas deck shoes, usually a darker color to hide stains. They wash well, and if you get them truly ruined its not a huge loss to get rid of them. And because you get several at once, you are probably good for a few years (and usually a discount).

    Style, availability, and feel are a big part of this, so just saying "buy this shoe" is generally not helpful. You probably want to find a mid-range shoe store with a very large selection and try on a dozen or more shoes at once until you find a pair that looks nice, feels nice, and meets your budget. DSW is a national chain that runs from inexpensive to ~$200 in shoe price range and typically is the top end of what I will shop for (and then only for a very nice dress shoes for dates and meetings and interviews and weddings sort of thing). I rarely break over $150, but going 80-150 is usually the norm per shoe if you want something that will last a bit.

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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    I've usually been lucky with trekking shoes for casual use.
    Of the relatively big trekking brands Merrell can be hit and miss (some of my best and my worst shoes have been merrell) but shoes like North Face Fastpacks and Salomon GTX have been consistently good. Since they tend to have more structure that your average sneakers it's extremely important to get a good fit (especially a heel that grips like glue but is still comfortable).

    For me these tend to last maybe 2 years, but for my brother (who walks 10-20 km every day) they tend to last about 9-12 months before the outer sole is worn down.

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  • RightfulSinRightfulSin Registered User regular
    Enc wrote: »
    For often-outside, mixed weather shoes in a place where its dry, some mid-range dress boots might be a good call. They run on the higher end as a shoe style but they hold together quite well and the leather shouldn't get gummy or moldy in a dry environment like socal. You might want to buy some insoles after getting your gait checked before trying on the shoes and go a size up to accommodate them, that way when your shoes get "flat" and you feel like you no longer have support you just replace the insole for 15 bucks instead of the whole shoe. Leather is usually the best bet when you are walking through shoes often and need to stay dressy.

    For casuals, I almost always go cheap because I have a habit of doing stupid shit with friends to ruin them. I usually buy several pair of canvas deck shoes, usually a darker color to hide stains. They wash well, and if you get them truly ruined its not a huge loss to get rid of them. And because you get several at once, you are probably good for a few years (and usually a discount).

    Style, availability, and feel are a big part of this, so just saying "buy this shoe" is generally not helpful. You probably want to find a mid-range shoe store with a very large selection and try on a dozen or more shoes at once until you find a pair that looks nice, feels nice, and meets your budget. DSW is a national chain that runs from inexpensive to ~$200 in shoe price range and typically is the top end of what I will shop for (and then only for a very nice dress shoes for dates and meetings and interviews and weddings sort of thing). I rarely break over $150, but going 80-150 is usually the norm per shoe if you want something that will last a bit.

    Thanks for the advice. Ya I wasn't looking for a "buy this shoe", more so some helpful advice to that end.

    "If nothing is impossible, than would it not be impossible to find something that you could not do?" - Me
  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    Ecco. They make great shoes.
    Comfy, good looking and good quality.

    Also if you like sneakers then Adidas has huge variety, but quality is not always great so check the reviews on the shoes in question before buying. Also their sizes are not that consistent from model to model, so if buying on-line know that if a size X fits you with a shoe you have a different shoe from them you might need X and a ½ for it to fit right.

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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Ecco. They make great shoes.
    Comfy, good looking and good quality.

    Also if you like sneakers then Adidas has huge variety, but quality is not always great so check the reviews on the shoes in question before buying. Also their sizes are not that consistent from model to model, so if buying on-line know that if a size X fits you with a shoe you have a different shoe from them you might need X and a ½ for it to fit right.

    I used to love Ecco shoes. Then they changed their heel design and now I can't any of them. Because they fuck up my heels. So badly. Like "walk 100 meters and they've stripped all the skin from my heel tendon" bad.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
  • SoggybiscuitSoggybiscuit At the edge of spacetime lies a path with no end.Registered User regular
    What is your budget?

    I'm a larger dude and hard on shoes. The only shoes I've ever had last me any amount of time are SAS shoes. Most brands I can get 6-8 months if I'm lucky. With SAS shoes, I normally get 1.5 - 2 years out of a pair. I usually wear the tread off and wear out the insoles well before the shoe is actually done. They aren't flashy, but they get the job done. Expensive however, expect to pay $200 for a pair. I am partial to these; they take some breaking in but they are comfortable once they are.

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  • GrisloGrislo Registered User regular
    Ecco. They make great shoes.
    Comfy, good looking and good quality.

    If I wanted a pair of random, pretty nice shoes, I'd start with Ecco too.

    More expensive than your 'last half a year' shoes, but while you might pay let's say 5 times as much, they'll last more than 5 times longer, easily.

    There's an upper limit on spending where the quality won't keep improving, but it is worth it to buy decent shoes. Just don't buy anything if you're unsure about the fit. And, if you buy nice/expensive shoes, you can replace the sole when/if it wears out, which might make financial sense.

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  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    I am a fan of Keens. They are very comfortable for my huge flat feet.

    ShadowfireDoctorArch
  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    edited October 9
    Grislo wrote: »
    Ecco. They make great shoes.
    Comfy, good looking and good quality.

    If I wanted a pair of random, pretty nice shoes, I'd start with Ecco too.

    More expensive than your 'last half a year' shoes, but while you might pay let's say 5 times as much, they'll last more than 5 times longer, easily.

    There's an upper limit on spending where the quality won't keep improving, but it is worth it to buy decent shoes. Just don't buy anything if you're unsure about the fit. And, if you buy nice/expensive shoes, you can replace the sole when/if it wears out, which might make financial sense.

    If you buy nice shoes with an option for leather soles, get whatever weatherproof soles they offer instead. These shoes can go for $300-600, but they have the advantage of lasting for years, since their soles are sewn on in a watertight fashion and can be fully replaced.

    Make sure this is actually true before buying. Less expensive dress shoes have an injection molded sole which cracks over time and becomes unrepairable, and shoes with a stitch on the bottom of the sole may just go right through to the inner liner without regard for waterproofing (Blake Stitch). The Goodyear welt is the gold standard.

    With expensive full grain leather shoes, they should be very comfortable out of the box to stand in, though they may need some breaking in for long walks. If not, don't buy them. If you're not comfortable with hard soled shoes that have no cushioning or do not like shoe maintenance, they are not for you.

    Paladin on
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  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    I'm a big fan of New balance for my wide feet. I generally go through a pair every 2 years or so of moderate use. For work boots I like Timberland pro water proof insulated boots.

  • RightfulSinRightfulSin Registered User regular
    The big issue I tend to have is I tend to wear out the inner sole before the outer sole (thread) is worn. I think I also might have an odd step or gait. What I mean is the I walk tends to have my feet pointed to the outside, putting higher stress/pressure on my large toe and ball of foot (resulting in both having decent calluses on each foot).

    "If nothing is impossible, than would it not be impossible to find something that you could not do?" - Me
  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    The big issue I tend to have is I tend to wear out the inner sole before the outer sole (thread) is worn. I think I also might have an odd step or gait. What I mean is the I walk tends to have my feet pointed to the outside, putting higher stress/pressure on my large toe and ball of foot (resulting in both having decent calluses on each foot).

    If you repeatedly get pain or discomfort in your leg or hip worsened by exercise, you may benefit from discussing this with a podiatrist / physiatrist / physical therapist to determine if an orthotic is needed for gait correction, but otherwise if you're just looking for durability, try a rigid insert that feels comfortable. You may have to spend a bit of money if the insert requires trimming to fit in the shoe, or you could splurge on a custom insert online. If that's the only thing wearing out your shoes, then getting the right insert rather than the right shoe may be your most economical solution.

    If you do want a higher end shoe but not an insert and want to go leather, try shoes with different "lasts" which are the mold shapes used to craft the shoe. Unlike sneakers and mass produced dress shoes, the insoles of high end shoes are also made of leather and are much more durable to wear. In addition, many cobblers will be able to replace them.

    Marty: The future, it's where you're going?
    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
  • RightfulSinRightfulSin Registered User regular
    Well, I got my gait and soles check up, and my gait has a "flexible" ankle and I supposedly have fairly high arches.

    "If nothing is impossible, than would it not be impossible to find something that you could not do?" - Me
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    dispatch.o wrote: »
    I am a fan of Keens. They are very comfortable for my huge flat feet.

    Can confirm. I have Keen boots and some open sandal-like shoes that are super comfy and durable. I also have a pair of Carhartt shoes for work that have steel toes. They've saved my feet from some big heavy ass TVs a couple times now.

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  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    Any advice on good shoes? For a bit now I have bought the ones from Wal-Mart and am getting a little tired of needing to buy new ones so often. I do a fair bit of walking and I am extremely rough on my shoes, in the sense that the sole (both inner and outer) wear down decently fast. I am size 12.5-13 and usually get the Wide version if available. Also, by fast I mean I am usually going through the pair to where they are worn and a bit uncomfortable to wear in less than 3-4 months. I am not sure if thats common or not. I just hate having to keep buying shoes for my damn feet. Thanks.

    15-20 years ago I would have said Airwalks because while they were "lawl skater shoes" they were the most comfortable shoe I've ever worn and came in enough styles that you could use them for pretty much everything outside of a bridesmaid/groomsman at a wedding or a pallbearer at a funeral. On top of that? They lasted for years.

    Buuuuut Airwalks are terrible now (I know, I foolishly bought two pairs. One is garbage because their sizing sucks and the other is basically converse but a shittier sole and a useless amount of more padding on the sides). So to get that old school Airwalk fit you have to go for Sketchers and while they can fill the same niche it's not the same level of variety and they also don't have the durability the old Airwalks did.

    If you're extremely rough on your shoes my suggestion would be a pair of Redwing boots. They're incredibly durable and while they usually focus on work boots they have a line of ankle high boots that are comfortable on their own but also very accepting of insoles if needed while looking good. They're not cheap but it's very much a case of you get what you pay for. I have a pair that I paid $160 for 9 years ago and the only reason they have any damage is because I'm pretty careless about wear when wearing steel toed boots.

  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    If I could ask a somewhat similar question, I'm looking for a pair of something in-between work boots and hiking boots. Mostly to wear camping/hiking between 50-30F and around the garage/house doing some light carpentry, gardening, etc. I'd like something with a safety toe as I usually work alone and use my toe to help lift things like plywood, or shunt (kick) things into place, and something I could hose mud off of. Was hoping there would be something more breathable than the solid work boots out there.

  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited October 20
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    If I could ask a somewhat similar question, I'm looking for a pair of something in-between work boots and hiking boots. Mostly to wear camping/hiking between 50-30F and around the garage/house doing some light carpentry, gardening, etc. I'd like something with a safety toe as I usually work alone and use my toe to help lift things like plywood, or shunt (kick) things into place, and something I could hose mud off of. Was hoping there would be something more breathable than the solid work boots out there.

    I hesitate to recommend any sort of work boot for hiking. The toe will make it heavy and hot and generally work boots are rigid for walking on things like plank or rebar.

    I wear these Keen Omahas as my daily shoe to get to/from work and around the house for projects. I'd definitely get something lighter with more mobility for hiking.

    dispatch.o on
    Fiendishrabbit
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    I wear Wolverine hikers with a composite toe at work, but I'm not sure how easy they are to find online.

  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    I wear Wolverine hikers with a composite toe at work, but I'm not sure how easy they are to find online.

    Something like these? https://www.amazon.com/Wolverine-Mens-W02625-Durant-M-Brown/dp/B001A2RZW8/ref=sr_1_15?dchild=1&keywords=Wolverine+Hiking+Boots&qid=1603410758&sr=8-15&th=1&psc=1 I think this looks kinda like what I was asking for, a stiffer toe, breathability, hopefully durability.

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Yep! I have a slightly different model but those are basically the same thing

    Simpsonia
  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    For work I'd look at Redwing boots. They'll stand up to whatever you throw at them and with just a bit of maintenance they will last years and years.

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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    dispatch.o wrote: »
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    If I could ask a somewhat similar question, I'm looking for a pair of something in-between work boots and hiking boots. Mostly to wear camping/hiking between 50-30F and around the garage/house doing some light carpentry, gardening, etc. I'd like something with a safety toe as I usually work alone and use my toe to help lift things like plywood, or shunt (kick) things into place, and something I could hose mud off of. Was hoping there would be something more breathable than the solid work boots out there.

    I hesitate to recommend any sort of work boot for hiking. The toe will make it heavy and hot and generally work boots are rigid for walking on things like plank or rebar.

    I wear these Keen Omahas as my daily shoe to get to/from work and around the house for projects. I'd definitely get something lighter with more mobility for hiking.

    Forestry and mountaineering boots can have reinforced toes. And they tend to have a reinforced rubber "front" as well for kicking stuff. They're not the lighest boots around but they're decent for hiking.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
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