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[Homeowner/House] Thread. How long is it going to take? Two weeks!

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  • JimBobtheMonkeyJimBobtheMonkey Registered User regular
    Hey homeowner thread. My parents have this old outlet in their kitchen. It's above the sink and about 12-18 inches from the ceiling. After a bit of searching I figured out that it was probably for a wall clock. My question is, does it take a special kind of cord or would a regular non-grounded 2 prong work in it? The raised diamond thing in the middle makes me feel like it needs something special, but I don't know. The only thing I've been able to find on it was on ebay.
    0v1h59ntpk4a.jpg
    www ebay.com/itm/Vtg-Arrow-H-H-Brown-Bakelite-Deco-Ribbed-Lines-Recessed-Clock-Outlet-2-Prong-E-/382870446156

  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    That's just a standard 2 prong outlet. Diamond shape is just decorative. It's recessed so a clock can hide it and can sit flush against the wall.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
    ShadowfireElvenshaeAbsoluteZeroDaenris
  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    Hey homeowner thread. My parents have this old outlet in their kitchen. It's above the sink and about 12-18 inches from the ceiling. After a bit of searching I figured out that it was probably for a wall clock. My question is, does it take a special kind of cord or would a regular non-grounded 2 prong work in it? The raised diamond thing in the middle makes me feel like it needs something special, but I don't know. The only thing I've been able to find on it was on ebay.
    0v1h59ntpk4a.jpg
    www ebay.com/itm/Vtg-Arrow-H-H-Brown-Bakelite-Deco-Ribbed-Lines-Recessed-Clock-Outlet-2-Prong-E-/382870446156

    If you make sure it is 14 or 12 gauge wire with a 15 or 20 amp breaker you could just replace it with a modern outlet suitable for either. Otherwise, it'd be hard to say with confidence what that one is rated for.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    edited April 7
    I've never (as an adult who can tell the difference) encountered a two-pronged outlet old enough to have symmetrical holes. I'm not certain you could even plug a modern two-pronged plug into it since the neutral side of modern plugs is bigger than the hot side.

    Edit: but maybe those are asymmetrical... I thought they weren't but now I'm convincing myself I was wrong.

    CptHamilton on
    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    I've never (as an adult who can tell the difference) encountered a two-pronged outlet old enough to have symmetrical holes. I'm not certain you could even plug a modern two-pronged plug into it since the neutral side of modern plugs is bigger than the hot side.

    Edit: but maybe those are asymmetrical... I thought they weren't but now I'm convincing myself I was wrong.

    You gotta stare at the middle, then unfocus your eyes as you slowly pull the image away from your face

    DoodmannCptHamiltonShadowfireCarpyThawmusElvenshaeSiliconStewMugsleyN1tSt4lkerHappylilElfMichaelLCAbsoluteZeroSyngyneAegisSkeith
  • JimBobtheMonkeyJimBobtheMonkey Registered User regular
    Thanks everyone for the info!

  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    State Farm is the 800 lb gorilla of homeowners in the US.
    https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/insurance/top-home-insurance-companies/

    There are many good ones and most of the top ones are decent enough (bias check: I work for one of the top 5). You can usually avoid issues by taking a bunch of pictures of your stuff, keeping a general spreadsheet of your stuff and keeping it updated. The easiest way to get what you want in an insurance claim is to have all the documentation and evidence to support why they should pay you what you're asking. If you make it easy, caseloads are generally high enough they won't fight you as it's an easy cut check/close, especially if they're an independent contracted to adjust as they're paid a per claim fee so easy stuff is free money for them. Otherwise, they'll be using standard schedules. The vaguer you are on stuff, the cheaper the stuff. Also note that if you have specific collections or high value items, MAKE SURE THEY'RE COVERED properly. Many times people pay for less than what they need and hit personal item limits OR don't have good documentation/certification of value.
    Good example for understanding: https://www.reddit.com/r/ChicoCA/comments/75t7uk/former_fire_insurance_adjuster_gives_advice_on/

    People are trying to defraud and sue the crap out of insurance companies constantly, so often the immediate response to vague things and threats is that you're treating it as a winning lottery ticket.

    ThawmusTrajan45SageinaRageN1tSt4lkerShadowfire
  • BloodycowBloodycow Registered User regular
    I have State Farm as USAA was way more expensive at the time when we bought our house back in 2012. (For which I just got a letter from the county stating my appraised value went up 20k, so yay to having my property taxes go up yet again.)

    I have made two claims with State Farm for water damages. One was a pipe freezing and bursting in my wall in the basement while my rentor at the time didn't notice for like a day or two and there was 6 inches of water in the finished basement.

    That claim went through really quickly and smoothly and everything was replaced or fixed to what it was before the water.

    I just made another water damage claim about a month ago as my water line to my fridge upstairs sprung a leak that went unnoticed for a week and ruined the bathroom directly below and my kitchen floors.

    Again the claim has gone smoothly and everything is being fixed and replaced. Plus my kitchen flooring is discontinued so they can't replace just the section around the fridge. So I get all new kitchen floors, but it extends to my front door and dining area.

    Bonus.

    " I am a warrior, so that my son may be a merchant, so that his son may be a poet.”
    ― John Quincy Adams
    zepherin
  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    My flood insurance/homeowners/car insurance is all through State Farm. So far I've had a car that I totalled, and a totalled car due to a flood, and a totalled house due to same flood. I've never had a single problem. They've always been really easy to work with and always paid out the most they could for the claim without even a squabble. Same for my grandmother after Katrina and any time my parents have had a claim. My parents had a tractor stolen from their detached garage, and SF paid out the claim with no squabble. And I know flood insurance is via the Fed, BUT I've definitely known people with other insurance companies that had to fight for every single cent, and that was not my experience at all.

    Now, I will say that my sister was um...non-renewed after having a number of at-fault accidents and speeding tickets. But I am not aware of what the threshold was for that or what that might entail if applied to homeowner's? Don't do a lot of at-fault home damage I guess! :-D

  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    State Farm is the 800 lb gorilla of homeowners in the US.
    https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/insurance/top-home-insurance-companies/

    There are many good ones and most of the top ones are decent enough (bias check: I work for one of the top 5). You can usually avoid issues by taking a bunch of pictures of your stuff, keeping a general spreadsheet of your stuff and keeping it updated. The easiest way to get what you want in an insurance claim is to have all the documentation and evidence to support why they should pay you what you're asking. If you make it easy, caseloads are generally high enough they won't fight you as it's an easy cut check/close, especially if they're an independent contracted to adjust as they're paid a per claim fee so easy stuff is free money for them. Otherwise, they'll be using standard schedules. The vaguer you are on stuff, the cheaper the stuff. Also note that if you have specific collections or high value items, MAKE SURE THEY'RE COVERED properly. Many times people pay for less than what they need and hit personal item limits OR don't have good documentation/certification of value.
    Good example for understanding: https://www.reddit.com/r/ChicoCA/comments/75t7uk/former_fire_insurance_adjuster_gives_advice_on/

    People are trying to defraud and sue the crap out of insurance companies constantly, so often the immediate response to vague things and threats is that you're treating it as a winning lottery ticket.

    Does my Price Charting list count, I need to make sure I get reimbursed for Cubivore, ah man

  • jkylefultonjkylefulton Squid...or Kid? NNID - majpellRegistered User regular
    Do not make the mistake of assuming that every company's policies function the same way. If you're really curious, ask each company for policy jackets, and focus on the exclusions (i.e. what they are definitively NOT going to cover). That's where you'll find the differences. Hint - there's a reason for the price differences!

    tOkYVT2.jpg
    Gilgaron
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Good news! I bought a really nice hose reel to take care of my leaking hose problem.

    Bad news! The reel is intended to be mounted but I don't want to drill holes in to our deck's railing.

    This is the current inelegant solution:

    q3t6tru3vxfl.jpg
    1aa50urclgia.jpg

    I assume I need something like a brace or a bracket or a widget to secure it in place but not sure what.

    Kruitezepherin
  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    Duct tape

  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    You could use a bracket to clamp a piece of 2x4 to wherever you want to mount that so you have something to drill into. Or two 2x4s with some machine screws holding them together. I did something along those lines to hold some sacrificial oak to a stairpost for mounting a baby gate.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    If you have a hammer drill you could just drill a hole in that brick and screw it in with a big washer.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    jmcdonaldShadowfire
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    If you have a hammer drill you could just drill a hole in that brick and screw it in with a big washer.

    Just make sure you're using a good masonry bit or you're going to destroy the bit, burn out the motor, or crack the brick. Or all three!

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    MichaelLCzagdrobBullhead
  • RadiationRadiation Registered User regular
    Yo @Quid I have some masonry bits.
    If you want to get that off the ground I'm sure we could find a board (and some sort of padding) to fit inside that space and lift it up.

    Also since I'm already sending the at signal here, when did you want to do food?

    PSN: jfrofl
    Shadowfire
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited April 10
    Anyone in the Milwaukee ecosystem or looking for a good intro, home depot has the Milwaukee string trimmer with bonus pole saw attachment, an 8 AH battery and charger for $299.

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-M18-FUEL-18-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Brushless-Cordless-String-Trimmer-Kit-with-M18-FUEL-10-in-Pole-Saw-Attachment-2825-21ST-49-16-2720/308304985

    matt has a problem on
    nibXTE7.png
  • SeñorAmorSeñorAmor !!! Registered User regular
    I have that Milwaukee string trimmer. Not really a fan of it.

    The reel sits too high so it makes cutting anything but extremely tall grass a huge pain. It's also hell on batteries. I honestly wish I could still return it.

    It's a shame. The rest of my Milwaukee stuff is very nice. It's why I bought the trimmer.

  • SpaffySpaffy Fuck the Zero Registered User regular
    Today’s rage is that after repairing some holes in plasterboard concrete, my very expensive, properly sealed paint seems to have separated and spoiled in the six months since I bought it.

    Ima grab a wooden spoon and see if stirring it helps, but it’s freaking annoying that I may have to buy 2.5l of very expensive paint to patch an inch wide hole.

    ALRIGHT FINE I GOT AN AVATAR
    Steam: adamjnet
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Spaffy wrote: »
    Today’s rage is that after repairing some holes in plasterboard concrete, my very expensive, properly sealed paint seems to have separated and spoiled in the six months since I bought it.

    Ima grab a wooden spoon and see if stirring it helps, but it’s freaking annoying that I may have to buy 2.5l of very expensive paint to patch an inch wide hole.

    Can you not buy a sample tub instead?

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Tool ecosystems: I was on low-key watch for the Dewalt fan being on sale. It's currently on a CPO tools affiliated website for $99 + free 5Ah battery.

  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    Spaffy wrote: »
    Today’s rage is that after repairing some holes in plasterboard concrete, my very expensive, properly sealed paint seems to have separated and spoiled in the six months since I bought it.

    Ima grab a wooden spoon and see if stirring it helps, but it’s freaking annoying that I may have to buy 2.5l of very expensive paint to patch an inch wide hole.

    Paint separating while sitting is normal. If you can stir all the sludge off the bottom (it hasn't started solidifying) where the color starts coming back to normal, it's probably fine. Then take it to any store that sells paint and ask them to shake it up again for you.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
    webguy20SageinaRageElvenshae
  • The WolfmanThe Wolfman Registered User regular
    I've never had paint irrevocably go bad. I've had paint I've had to stir for goddamn near 15 minutes straight, and the before and after shots you would swear are two completely different colours.

    Just get a paint stick, make sure you're reaching the very bottom of the can, and start pumping them arms.

    "The sausage of Green Earth explodes with flavor like the cannon of culinary delight."
    PSN: TheWolfman64 3DS/Pokemon Y: 0774-4614-4065/NNID: the_wolfman64
    SageinaRageElvenshaeGilgaron
  • GrudgeGrudge still hereRegistered User regular
    edited April 10
    EDIT: doh, serves me right for not reading entire posts

    Or go to the paint store, tell them that it has separated and ask if they can shake it up again for you.

    Grudge on
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    I got one of those metal stirring doo-dads that attach to a drill that are normally used for mixing up drywall mud and I use that almost exclusively to stir up old paint. Works a treat and saves my arms.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
    ElvenshaeDaenris
  • zagdrobzagdrob Registered User regular
    I got one of those metal stirring doo-dads that attach to a drill that are normally used for mixing up drywall mud and I use that almost exclusively to stir up old paint. Works a treat and saves my arms.

    A metal coat hanger stretched out is the poor man's / emergency version of this. It works fairly well if you don't have the real stirrer. Keep the RPM low and take your time, works better with an electric drill.

    webguy20ShadowfireHappylilElf
  • Captain InertiaCaptain Inertia Registered User regular
    I planted about 50 shrubs today and manually turned over/“tilled” about 600 sq feet, and that should be the last major landscaping I need to do to make my backyard a great family space for my daughters

    Then my FIL just mentions out of the blue tonight he’s been cleaning out his shed and I can have his gas tiller if I need it

    My back tried to slap him

    jmcdonaldMichaelLCPailryderwebguy20HappylilElfCarpyJebus314AntoshkaN1tSt4lkerAbsoluteZeroIcemopperAegisKruiteTrajan45BullheadschussSporkAndrewRadiationElvenshaedjmitchellaThegreatcowCalicaAl_watFoolOnTheHill
  • AntoshkaAntoshka Miauen Oil Change LazarusRegistered User regular
    I have removed my guttering, painted underneath, and then painted it again, because you have to do this twice for some reason. Anyway, everything is ready for new / non rusted guttering to be installed! Yay!

    With luck, this is the final thing I have to do that involves roofing.

    n57PM0C.jpg
    AbsoluteZeroMichaelLCShadowfireElvenshae
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    Speaking of roofing does anyone know if they ever invented a sealant for gutter joints that can handle annual temps as low as -40℉ and as high as I'm guessing around 120-130℉ (if it's in direct sunlight all day in the summer) that actually lasts?

  • webguy20webguy20 I spend too much time on the Internet Registered User regular
    Antoshka wrote: »
    I have removed my guttering, painted underneath, and then painted it again, because you have to do this twice for some reason. Anyway, everything is ready for new / non rusted guttering to be installed! Yay!

    With luck, this is the final thing I have to do that involves roofing.

    If you're painting wood it's because it'll absorb the first coat of paint into the grain of the wood. The 2nd coat is the one that will seal it up and make it look good. Really thirsty wood can take up to 3 coats of paint.

    Steam ID: Webguy20
    Origin ID: Discgolfer27
    Untappd ID: Discgolfer1981
    HappylilElfPailryderjmcdonald
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Speaking of roofing does anyone know if they ever invented a sealant for gutter joints that can handle annual temps as low as -40℉ and as high as I'm guessing around 120-130℉ (if it's in direct sunlight all day in the summer) that actually lasts?

    Assuming you mean where the gutter meets the eaves, have you tried bathroom silicone? It's still flexible after it cures and should be able to withstand those extremes. I'm not sure what low temp it may become brittle.

  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Maybe this stuff? It's a ten pack.

    Titebond 10.1 oz. White WeatherMaster Exterior Sealant (12-Pack)
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Titebond-10-1-oz-White-WeatherMaster-Exterior-Sealant-12-Pack-44001A/203295120
    SKU# 203295120

    Jokerman wrote: »
    If sigs were still a thing this would be mine.
    HappylilElf
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    edited April 11
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Speaking of roofing does anyone know if they ever invented a sealant for gutter joints that can handle annual temps as low as -40℉ and as high as I'm guessing around 120-130℉ (if it's in direct sunlight all day in the summer) that actually lasts?

    Assuming you mean where the gutter meets the eaves, have you tried bathroom silicone? It's still flexible after it cures and should be able to withstand those extremes. I'm not sure what low temp it may become brittle.

    I'd just hit the hardware store and look for a caulk that is labeled for gutters and flashing. Bathroom silicone likely won't adhere well if there's any moisture present and also may not be rated for full water immersion. And while I don't think they're talking about trying to seal against the eaves, bathroom silicone generally won't stick to wood either as the surface is too rough.

    SiliconStew on
    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
    HappylilElf
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    Mugsley wrote: »
    Speaking of roofing does anyone know if they ever invented a sealant for gutter joints that can handle annual temps as low as -40℉ and as high as I'm guessing around 120-130℉ (if it's in direct sunlight all day in the summer) that actually lasts?

    Assuming you mean where the gutter meets the eaves, have you tried bathroom silicone? It's still flexible after it cures and should be able to withstand those extremes. I'm not sure what low temp it may become brittle.

    The actual downspout joints. We have an unnecessarily complicated roof which means we have a necessarily complicated gutter system. There a point next to the front door where an L joint is leaking water almost directly into an inverted foundation corner.

    It's not a problem yet but it's one of those "If we ignore this for a few years it could become a problem" type situations.
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    Maybe this stuff? It's a ten pack.

    Titebond 10.1 oz. White WeatherMaster Exterior Sealant (12-Pack)
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Titebond-10-1-oz-White-WeatherMaster-Exterior-Sealant-12-Pack-44001A/203295120
    SKU# 203295120

    Hmm that might work.

    Worst case scenario probably just means having to get up on the ladder and replace it occasionally which is manageable.

  • AntoshkaAntoshka Miauen Oil Change LazarusRegistered User regular
    webguy20 wrote: »
    Antoshka wrote: »
    I have removed my guttering, painted underneath, and then painted it again, because you have to do this twice for some reason. Anyway, everything is ready for new / non rusted guttering to be installed! Yay!

    With luck, this is the final thing I have to do that involves roofing.

    If you're painting wood it's because it'll absorb the first coat of paint into the grain of the wood. The 2nd coat is the one that will seal it up and make it look good. Really thirsty wood can take up to 3 coats of paint.

    This is actually useful to know, since now I can also check if 2 was enough. If not, I have time to add another while my neighbor in their adjoining unit does theirs. It's definitely noticable on what guttering actually does, currently - with the heavy rain over the few days I've had no gutters, there is a very clean line on the concrete the entire length of the house on both sides.

    n57PM0C.jpg
    webguy20HappylilElf
  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    Speaking of bathroom silicone, I just found water damage in the ceiling of the room below the master bath. After investigating, it appears to be coming from the shower, and my best guess is that water is getting through where the silicone has separated from the shower floor tray and the wall covering. From what I can tell, there isn't any insulation or other substrate that the water is going through before it gets to the acoustic tile ceiling below, so I don't see or think there is much damage yet. I don't know when the shower was installed, but it isn't that old.

    My questions and fears are now ranging between 1. Can I strip the existing sealant off and re-seal or 2. Is there more damage that I can't see that will require me to remove the entire shower enclosure and replace (2a. Is this something I am capable of or should I just hire a professional?).

    Really not great timing if I end up needing to replace the shower as I'm already trying to replace the roof and restore my windows.

  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    Icemopper wrote: »
    Speaking of bathroom silicone, I just found water damage in the ceiling of the room below the master bath. After investigating, it appears to be coming from the shower, and my best guess is that water is getting through where the silicone has separated from the shower floor tray and the wall covering. From what I can tell, there isn't any insulation or other substrate that the water is going through before it gets to the acoustic tile ceiling below, so I don't see or think there is much damage yet. I don't know when the shower was installed, but it isn't that old.

    My questions and fears are now ranging between 1. Can I strip the existing sealant off and re-seal or 2. Is there more damage that I can't see that will require me to remove the entire shower enclosure and replace (2a. Is this something I am capable of or should I just hire a professional?).

    Really not great timing if I end up needing to replace the shower as I'm already trying to replace the roof and restore my windows.

    So here's my advice, as someone who ended up completely redoing a shower and it turned out "sort of okay": do the easiest thing possible.

    You have other stuff going on: unless the roof is sagging underneath or whatever, this is not a problem you need to deal with right now. Strip the silicone and reseal.

    Because the alternative here is you'll be putting in a whole new shower - and that's a big annoying project that knocks you down a bathroom in availability.

    Now, you probably should eventually put in a new shower...but if it's taken this long to cause a problem, then if silicone stops the leak, the problem is solved and you just need too keep an eye on it. Finish your other stuff first.

    GilgaronIcemopperShadowfire
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    Icemopper wrote: »
    Speaking of bathroom silicone, I just found water damage in the ceiling of the room below the master bath. After investigating, it appears to be coming from the shower, and my best guess is that water is getting through where the silicone has separated from the shower floor tray and the wall covering. From what I can tell, there isn't any insulation or other substrate that the water is going through before it gets to the acoustic tile ceiling below, so I don't see or think there is much damage yet. I don't know when the shower was installed, but it isn't that old.

    My questions and fears are now ranging between 1. Can I strip the existing sealant off and re-seal or 2. Is there more damage that I can't see that will require me to remove the entire shower enclosure and replace (2a. Is this something I am capable of or should I just hire a professional?).

    Really not great timing if I end up needing to replace the shower as I'm already trying to replace the roof and restore my windows.

    It would probably be worth sticking a probe camera down there. You can get such a camera on Amazon for less than $50.

    steam_sig.png
    Icemopper
  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    Icemopper wrote: »
    Speaking of bathroom silicone, I just found water damage in the ceiling of the room below the master bath. After investigating, it appears to be coming from the shower, and my best guess is that water is getting through where the silicone has separated from the shower floor tray and the wall covering. From what I can tell, there isn't any insulation or other substrate that the water is going through before it gets to the acoustic tile ceiling below, so I don't see or think there is much damage yet. I don't know when the shower was installed, but it isn't that old.

    My questions and fears are now ranging between 1. Can I strip the existing sealant off and re-seal or 2. Is there more damage that I can't see that will require me to remove the entire shower enclosure and replace (2a. Is this something I am capable of or should I just hire a professional?).

    Really not great timing if I end up needing to replace the shower as I'm already trying to replace the roof and restore my windows.

    So here's my advice, as someone who ended up completely redoing a shower and it turned out "sort of okay": do the easiest thing possible.

    You have other stuff going on: unless the roof is sagging underneath or whatever, this is not a problem you need to deal with right now. Strip the silicone and reseal.

    Because the alternative here is you'll be putting in a whole new shower - and that's a big annoying project that knocks you down a bathroom in availability.

    Now, you probably should eventually put in a new shower...but if it's taken this long to cause a problem, then if silicone stops the leak, the problem is solved and you just need too keep an eye on it. Finish your other stuff first.

    This is what I'm thinking as well. We have another shower we can use in the meantime if the problem doesn't get better, but if a bit more silicone saves it from getting immediately worse that would be a huge help at least for a few months while the other stuff is worked out.

    I can see the pipes from above the ACT below and can tell that they are not the cause of the problem so I might not need a probe but I might invest in one anyway. I can tell I will need it in the future for some other projects.

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