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[Book]: Rhymes With

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  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Man, just finished Salvation by Hamilton. I did not quite expect the ending, which I appreciate.
    I assumed it would be a twist, otherwise why keep it a secret for the whole length of the story, but I was more expecting the twist to be "Humans are the enemy" and it turns out the Utopial/Universal divide reached a boiling point, or that the exiled humans finally managed to get off Zargeus or w/e and decide to hunt everyone else down. I also found it amusing how much time I spent looking for the Neanna or w/e, knowing they had landed. Based on the opening I assumed they weren't "the enemy", but I wasn't expecting the Olyix either. I assumed the Olyix secret was that they were also running from "the enemy", and just didn't want to spill the beans because it would make humans less likely to provide the energy needed to refill on anti-matter (although also the, "Hey, we're just stoping our interstellar starship for a top-up" bit seemed sketch as well).

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    Finished Martha Wells, All Systems Red (Murderbot). What a fantastic little short story. Delightful description of a sci-fi world and characters. The price per page on the follow up novels seems a little high but i'm going to be looking for an omnibus or some sort of collection to have.

    KanacredeikiMahnmutredxThe Zombie Penguin
  • dennisdennis Executive Peasant Registered User regular
    I recently read Medusa Uploaded and sequel Medusa in the Graveyard by Emily Devenport.

    I enjoyed both quite a lot, other than one tiny aspect where the author tells what happens at the end, then goes back in time, then maybe either goes back in time or somewhere between those points? It gets a bit confusing in the way it's presented, but ultimately it doesn't 100% matter. But I probably couldn't draw you the events on a timeline and know I was putting them in the right order.

    The first book seems to be going pretty straightforward, but then there are some elements introduced that you don't see coming and it ends up in a way that isn't obvious. And the second book involves a whole new setting, once again with a lot of unexpected stuff coming into play. There's especially a bit of a Roadside Picnic kind of vibe to it, which I always appreciate.


    And now I've moved onto Octavia Butler's Lilith's Brood (aka Xenogenesis) series. Been looking forward to that for a while and am just partway through the first book. It's not disappointing. I love going into books like this almost completely blind. I think I might have read a jacket summary for it 10 years ago and that's it.

    Pailryder
  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    Y'all, I'm re-watching Dirty Dancing for the first time since...well probably since I was a teenager. I either totally forgot or just never clocked that Robbie the Creep hands Baby a copy of The Fountainhead to justify his "some people count; some people don't" philosophy, and damn. Damn.

    dennisshryke
  • credeikicredeiki Registered User regular
    I reread William Gibson’s The Peripheral—I first read it when it came out ~7 years ago.

    I loved it on reread; oddly, I like it much better on reread than on first read. I think it’s because the premise is a bit convoluted, and on first read, you spend half the book disentangling the setting; on a second read, you can focus on the aesthetics of the different places and the character of the people and the exciting plot events (and again knowing the outline of the plot helps you focus here instead of being a bit perplexed at the stuff happening).

    On a reread, the characters have a lot of warmth and subtle psychology, and you pay attention to shit like how Lev is always cooking for Wilf+co, and how Flynne has this great friendship with the slightly older gamer couple who lives nearby.

    It is possible, then, that if you are approaching this book for the first time, I recommend reading Wikipedia about it, or similar?

    Also on a personal note—I basically only remembered two things clearly from my first read (other than the general setting conceit). I remembered a weird scene with this red cube washing machine weapon thing, and I strongly remembered that one character is trans, and it so strongly affected me at the time, as a person slowly coming around to their own trans identity. I was worried that I might discover that the character is handled poorly here, but they are done super well, and it’s just one facet of them (but central to a mystery (which is one of the core mysteries we get into) as to why they’re taking an interest in the plot at all). Gibson credits a sensitivity reader in the acknowledgements, but in general he’s so good at describing the experience of being embodied, and in this book he really goes into the physicality and psychology of wearing your body or someone else’s (because of the future tech), and some people feel comfortable wearing a different body and some people very much do not, in all sorts of ways (e.g one veteran guy is more comfortable in a humanoid mech than in the body of a cute girl, cause it just weirds him out to have breasts; another veteran doesn’t care as long as he can be in a body that isn’t missing limbs the way he is; the protagonist really likes the body she gets to go into and feels protective of it and kind of bonds with it, but also likes her own body; one guy hates being in any body that isn’t his own—and in general we deal so much in the book with the demands of the physical, like the amount of time we spend specifically addressing that characters need to pee is just enormous)
    Anyway, where was I? Ah that I bet Gibson would have done just fine even without the sensitivity reader. Ugh I still really like the scene too, it’s so subtle. Big character spoilers (but again maybe worth reading to better enjoy the book)
    When flynne is like, Griff, you are Ainsley from the future, and he’s like (paraphrasing here) yes, I didn’t know originally, but she knew so much spy stuff only I knew, and so much that I would have found out in the next few years. But what convinced me is that she knew some stuff that I’ve never told anyone, thoughts and feelings that have been with me since I was a kid.
    And then he just sort of looks away for a second and looks back and that’s the end of that discussion and man it just hit me so so so hard when I first read it and it still hits me now.
    I’m going to read something else but then I’ll read Agency; I’m pumped. Wilf is sort of an ineffective sadboi but also definitely charming and fun to read about so I am curious to see what happens with him.

    Steam, LoL: credeiki
    KanadennisMahnmutshrykeredxDizzy DFeloniousmozBrody
  • flamebroiledchickenflamebroiledchicken Registered User regular
    I really liked The Peripheral when it first came out as well, though I do remember being confused and underwhelmed by the ending. I should give it a re-read and see if that motivates me to finally pick up Agency- it's been on my shelf since like February 2020, but once the pandemic hit, reading a book about "what if Hillary Clinton actually won?" felt weirdly masochistic.

  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    edited July 19
    Agency is pretty great. Not really nearly a painful or disheartening as Peripheral.

    redx on
    This machine kills threads.
    Dizzy D
  • credeikicredeiki Registered User regular
    redx wrote: »
    Agency is pretty great. Not really nearly a painful or disheartening as Peripheral.

    I don’t find the Peripheral disheartening or painful

    All the characters end up with very pleasing endings imo. Certainly the setting itself isn’t joyful, but it is interesting and thoughtful and sometimes cool, and the book is all about moments of humanity and connection and ethical decisionmaking in the face of such a setting.

    Steam, LoL: credeiki
    Feloniousmoz
  • Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    edited July 20
    Wrong thread. Thanks Dennis!

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud on
    dennis
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Finished the Salvation series, by Hamilton. Definitely an interesting trio of books. The hook at the end into a potential sequel trilogy really fucking steals the wind out of the ending though.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
    LeumasWhite
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Are there any good newish cyberpunk books? So far I've enjoyed Snowcrash and pretty much nothing else.

  • SummaryJudgmentSummaryJudgment The purity of angry tambourine. Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Are there any good newish cyberpunk books? So far I've enjoyed Snowcrash and pretty much nothing else.

    I enjoyed Thin Air by Richard Morgan. He's putting out cyberpunk again after finishing his fantasy trilogy.

  • joshgotrojoshgotro west ohioRegistered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Are there any good newish cyberpunk books? So far I've enjoyed Snowcrash and pretty much nothing else.

    I don't think it's exactly cyberpunk but The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson was a trip.

    does it?
    TuminDevoutlyApathetic
  • dennisdennis Executive Peasant Registered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    Finished the Salvation series, by Hamilton. Definitely an interesting trio of books. The hook at the end into a potential sequel trilogy really fucking steals the wind out of the ending though.

    Peter "Why Write Less When You Can Write More" Hamilton? I am shocked.

    I like his writing - and I know people have said multiple times that they like his doorstoppers - but I just won't start anything by him unless it's been about a decade since he wrote it so I can be assured the one tome is it. As such, I enjoyed Great North Road and Fallen Dragon. I look forward to the 2030s, when I can read Light Chaser.

    And that's it, really. Three standalone novels, out of 25, over the course of 30ish years (according to wikipedia).

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud
  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    Good suggestions on Steampunk novels? I gave Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding and did not enjoy the characters. It felt like a really bad knock off Firefly with very little that actual ending up being "steam". I did enjoy Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld

  • TcheldorTcheldor Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    Finished the Salvation series, by Hamilton. Definitely an interesting trio of books. The hook at the end into a potential sequel trilogy really fucking steals the wind out of the ending though.

    Peter "Why Write Less When You Can Write More" Hamilton? I am shocked.

    I like his writing - and I know people have said multiple times that they like his doorstoppers - but I just won't start anything by him unless it's been about a decade since he wrote it so I can be assured the one tome is it. As such, I enjoyed Great North Road and Fallen Dragon. I look forward to the 2030s, when I can read Light Chaser.

    And that's it, really. Three standalone novels, out of 25, over the course of 30ish years (according to wikipedia).

    I enjoyed the night's dawn trilogy for 90% of it...

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  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    a
    Pailryder wrote: »
    Good suggestions on Steampunk novels? I gave Retribution Falls by Chris Wooding and did not enjoy the characters. It felt like a really bad knock off Firefly with very little that actual ending up being "steam". I did enjoy Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld

    It's not exactly steampunk but Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett is pretty good. Fair warning, it's book 1 of a series (I'm guessing a trilogy?) of which only two books exist so far.

    The Aeronaut's Windlass by Jim Butcher is exactly steampunk. Like, almost obnoxiously so. It's better than I thought it would be but it's also book 1 in a nominal series that he hasn't written any more of in 6 years.

    Perdido Street Station by China Mieville is pretty steampunk. I don't think it was technically steampunk before there was steampunk but it was at least getting in on the ground floor-ish. I found it to be wildly bleak and overall a depressing read but a lot of people like it.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    Pailryder
  • PhantPhant Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    Finished the Salvation series, by Hamilton. Definitely an interesting trio of books. The hook at the end into a potential sequel trilogy really fucking steals the wind out of the ending though.

    Peter "Why Write Less When You Can Write More" Hamilton? I am shocked.

    I like his writing - and I know people have said multiple times that they like his doorstoppers - but I just won't start anything by him unless it's been about a decade since he wrote it so I can be assured the one tome is it. As such, I enjoyed Great North Road and Fallen Dragon. I look forward to the 2030s, when I can read Light Chaser.

    And that's it, really. Three standalone novels, out of 25, over the course of 30ish years (according to wikipedia).

    Peter Hamilton feels to me what I imagine all the popular sexy thrillers are like, but Sci-fi. Not a lot of depth, but quite enjoyable.

  • nexuscrawlernexuscrawler Registered User regular
    Perdido Street Station sits somewhere between steampunk and new weird

    CptHamilton
  • dennisdennis Executive Peasant Registered User regular
    Phant wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    Brody wrote: »
    Finished the Salvation series, by Hamilton. Definitely an interesting trio of books. The hook at the end into a potential sequel trilogy really fucking steals the wind out of the ending though.

    Peter "Why Write Less When You Can Write More" Hamilton? I am shocked.

    I like his writing - and I know people have said multiple times that they like his doorstoppers - but I just won't start anything by him unless it's been about a decade since he wrote it so I can be assured the one tome is it. As such, I enjoyed Great North Road and Fallen Dragon. I look forward to the 2030s, when I can read Light Chaser.

    And that's it, really. Three standalone novels, out of 25, over the course of 30ish years (according to wikipedia).

    Peter Hamilton feels to me what I imagine all the popular sexy thrillers are like, but Sci-fi. Not a lot of depth, but quite enjoyable.

    I don't know. Thrillers tend to move the plot relentlessly forward, sometimes at the expense of depth. I feel like Hamilton's doorstops are the opposite. The plot often moves at a turgid pace while the author dicks around in one setting or the other, where nothing is really happening that's driving the plot.

    Septus
  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    Yeah, I feel Hamilton very often faffs around with some subplot that then ends up having nothing whatsoever to do with the rest of the book. So far I've felt the main plot makes up for it, but I do frown a lot during some sections.

  • SeptusSeptus Registered User regular
    Night's Dawn was a slog and too long by half. Recursion, as a counterexample, is a slick, lightning fast thriller. Perhaps not particularly better except for its brevity, but that's enough.

    PSN: Kurahoshi1
    dennis
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Are there any good newish cyberpunk books? So far I've enjoyed Snowcrash and pretty much nothing else.

    It is more Military Fiction but I just read The Red: First Light by Linda Nagata which explores the idea of the whole linked combat squad and modern warfare. It feels like like Cyberpunk's brother that you often confuse with Cyberpunk but is still a different thing. It was quite good and I wish I remember where I picked up the recommendation for it.

    Depending on what you mean by cyberpunk Charles Stross might have some stuff for you. Rule 34 is probably the closest but isn't punk focused with the protagonist being a cop but near future advanced technology dystopia-ish. Accelerando is singularity fiction and spends a fair amount of time in a phase that is pretty much cyberpunk. In general, Stross tends to work well for folks who are alright with Stephenson. Though Stross does know what an ending is. (Ignore the sprawling mega series that he just put off ending again.)

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
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  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    Salvation was alright, but sandwiched between having read Egan and Asher of reading sci-fi, doesn't really fill any sort of niche that I feel needed filling.

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    Annalee Newitz's Autonomous has cyber stuff and is punk AF, but I'd hesitate to call it cyberpunk. I kinda liked it. There's a romance thing that happens. It's... look, cyberpunk all tends to have bits of it that are little terrible, and are sorta pulpy, right?

    This machine kills threads.
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Perdido Street Station sits somewhere between steampunk and new weird

    Perdido Street Station is considered the like first major popular work of New Weird.

    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudEchohtm
  • EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    I feel like we've mostly moved past the classic cyberpunk, and nowadays we mostly get post-cyberpunk from a new generation of authors.

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  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    It's hard as we move into an era where some of that stuff has come true, some of it feels even more ridiculous, and all of it feels a little on the nose. Like, is Attack Surface something that would be considered cyberpunk? What about Peripheral?

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    Brody wrote: »
    It's hard as we move into an era where some of that stuff has come true, some of it feels even more ridiculous, and all of it feels a little on the nose. Like, is Attack Surface something that would be considered cyberpunk? What about Peripheral?

    I feel like Agency is closer close enough that I'd be like, yeah, it's cyberpunk. The Peripheral, eh... like all the action follows the wrong characters for it to be cyberpunk, there's a cyberpunk novel happen off to the side somewhere, and I think. Like, I might be misremembering, but I think you get to just get kinda reports about, like:
    The guy wired into the motorcycle, killing guys with a gun on a robotic arm.
    The deference of the compound with all the drove cover.

    The stuff in and around the party in the future, I guess... would count.

    shurg. It's maybe splitting hairs.

    This machine kills threads.
  • GrudgeGrudge still hereRegistered User regular
    edited July 27
    Hardwired by Walther Jon Williams feels like pretty much pure classic cyberpunk to me.

    Also, I remember reading a couple of books by Jon Courtenay Grimwood many years ago that were decent cyberpunk - reMix, redRobe and Lucifer's Dragon. They seem to have been out of print for quite some time though, but if you can get a hold of them they're pretty good.

    Nowadays I think this style shows it's age a bit (I still love the classics though), a more modern take on this is maybe Hannu Rajaniemis Quantum Thief trilogy. It's not as easy and straight forward as Neuromancer, but it shares some of the themes like virtual worlds, corporate power, badass freelance agents etc.

    Grudge on
    htmV1m
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    edited July 27
    Grudge wrote: »
    Hardwired by Walther Jon Williams feels like pretty much pure classic cyberpunk to me.

    Also, I remember reading a couple of books by Jon Courtenay Grimwood many years ago that were decent cyberpunk - reMix, redRobe and Lucifer's Dragon. They seem to have been out of print for quite some time though, but if you can get a hold of them they're pretty good.

    Nowadays I think this style shows it's age a bit (I still love the classics though), a more modern take on this is maybe Hannu Rajaniemis Quantum Thief trilogy. It's not as easy and straight forward as Neuromancer, but it shares some of the themes like virtual worlds, corporate power, badass freelance agents etc.

    I really liked the first two Quantum Thief books (is the third out yet), but I feel like those are more transhumanist? I guess what are we defining as cyberpunk vs generic Sci-Fi vs hard sci-fi for hard men vs w/e other sub-genre?

    Edit: I confused Quantum Thief with Quantum Magician. Both of them are interesting series. Thief is probably at least closer to what I would call cyberpunk?

    Brody on
    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • BrodyBrody The Watch The First ShoreRegistered User regular
    I guess I'm having a hard time because to me, cyberpunk is something that still takes place primarily in and around Earth. Neuromancer, Snow Crash, sort of a near future, humans are still recognizably human, but maybe with a couple of bonii like extra brain space or reflexes or w/e. Characters that you think you could probably manage to stat out in something like Shadowrun. When you start getting into something like Altered Carbon, I'm not sure what sort of more specific label really fits there? Earth is just a piece of prestige property, humans are still mostly recognizable, but also have backups, or live on a server or something. Is Blindsight cyberpunk? Or the sequel?

    "I will write your name in the ruin of them. I will paint you across history in the color of their blood."

    The Monster Baru Cormorant - Seth Dickinson

    Steam: Korvalain
  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    edited July 27
    Cyberpunk is transhuman, once you start getting into post human different definition of scarcity stuff like the Quantum Thief, I think you're probably doing something else.

    Maybe more so with the second and third books in Rajaniemis' trilogy.

    redx on
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  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    It doesn't help that a lot of what cyberpunk dystopic genre fiction predicted in the 80s/90s actually came true. Like, Megacorporations DO run pretty much everything now. The wealth gap has never been higher than it is now. Online interactions are now a part of daily life, in the dumbest possible ways.

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  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    It doesn't help that a lot of what cyberpunk dystopic genre fiction predicted in the 80s/90s actually came true. Like, Megacorporations DO run pretty much everything now. The wealth gap has never been higher than it is now. Online interactions are now a part of daily life, in the dumbest possible ways.

    It just turned out to be really boring.

    dennisN1tSt4lkerFuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudBrodyinitiatefailureMoridin889ShadowhopeGrudgeDoodmannGiantGeek2020
  • dennisdennis Executive Peasant Registered User regular
    edited July 27
    shryke wrote: »
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    It doesn't help that a lot of what cyberpunk dystopic genre fiction predicted in the 80s/90s actually came true. Like, Megacorporations DO run pretty much everything now. The wealth gap has never been higher than it is now. Online interactions are now a part of daily life, in the dumbest possible ways.

    It just turned out to be really boring.

    Most of the bad stuff and very little of the good stuff.

    Plus some terrible stuff that no one predicted.

    dennis on
    Hahnsoo1
  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    It doesn't help that a lot of what cyberpunk dystopic genre fiction predicted in the 80s/90s actually came true. Like, Megacorporations DO run pretty much everything now. The wealth gap has never been higher than it is now. Online interactions are now a part of daily life, in the dumbest possible ways.

    It just turned out to be really boring.

    Most of the bad stuff and very little of the good stuff.

    Plus some terrible stuff that no one predicted.

    I think more then that it just turns out no one felt the desire or need to seize direct political power. Just being rich and influential has been more then enough, same as it always was.

    dennisFuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudBrodyMoridin889Hahnsoo1
  • dennisdennis Executive Peasant Registered User regular
    shryke wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    It doesn't help that a lot of what cyberpunk dystopic genre fiction predicted in the 80s/90s actually came true. Like, Megacorporations DO run pretty much everything now. The wealth gap has never been higher than it is now. Online interactions are now a part of daily life, in the dumbest possible ways.

    It just turned out to be really boring.

    Most of the bad stuff and very little of the good stuff.

    Plus some terrible stuff that no one predicted.

    I think more then that it just turns out no one felt the desire or need to seize direct political power. Just being rich and influential has been more then enough, same as it always was.

    With the exception of one incredibly dumb rich person.

    Hahnsoo1GiantGeek2020
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    It doesn't help that a lot of what cyberpunk dystopic genre fiction predicted in the 80s/90s actually came true. Like, Megacorporations DO run pretty much everything now. The wealth gap has never been higher than it is now. Online interactions are now a part of daily life, in the dumbest possible ways.

    Cyberpunk came true in ways both worse and more banal than any of the book predictions. I interact with AI systems every day but it's because they're trying to sell my mortgage insurance. Megacorporations are taking over what we see and hear every day both to make more money selling us comic book movies and to convince people that politicians are lizard people harvesting children on Mars. I can put on a VR headset and wander around a social space but it's full of 12 year olds drawing 3d dick statues.

    But being a hacker is no more glamorous than it ever was and arguably less interesting than back when those books were written and nobody's got implanted mirror shades. Though my wife does technically have an implanted lens in her eye that is occasionally reflective in low light at the right angle, so maybe...

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    dennisshryke
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    shryke wrote: »
    Hahnsoo1 wrote: »
    It doesn't help that a lot of what cyberpunk dystopic genre fiction predicted in the 80s/90s actually came true. Like, Megacorporations DO run pretty much everything now. The wealth gap has never been higher than it is now. Online interactions are now a part of daily life, in the dumbest possible ways.

    It just turned out to be really boring.

    Most of the bad stuff and very little of the good stuff.

    Plus some terrible stuff that no one predicted.

    I think more then that it just turns out no one felt the desire or need to seize direct political power. Just being rich and influential has been more then enough, same as it always was.

    With the exception of one incredibly dumb rich person.
    I mean, cyberpunk is a product of the 80s, and having a rich and old celebrity as the head of state was definitely part of the consciousness back then. There are numerous cynical mentions in cyberpunk fiction on how such-and-such politician is a famous actor or technocrat or whatever, as a nod to Reagan. One could argue that Trump is a direct callback to that, too, in a lot of people's minds, if we are looking for some meaningless correlations between the cyberpunk future predicted and what actually happened.

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