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House/Homeowner Thread: 6 months late and 50k over budget

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Posts

  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    crzyango wrote: »
    Closing on Monday after being outbid on 5 different houses, and not even in a populated part of the state.

    Just spent the day filling a 15 yard dumpster with broken furniture and 10 years of "it'll look good in the house we eventually buy!"

    I'm thinking I'll be sore tomorrow.

    Manual labor is the worst.

    Congratulations!

    Pailryderjkylefultoncrzyango
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Put up the replacement hood and its fan *also* died in a blaze of glory. Something about getting the hood up on the wall threw the impeller out of balance.

    Looking for a different brand this time around, and still need to figure out WTF is going on.

  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    So this happened (pics below and don't know exactly when, we barely turned on the AC to check things). The guy that came out to look at it called lennox and is telling us that the warranty by lennox doesn't cover the top part. i'm at a loss and wondering if anyone here has experience with something like this.
    6kzijggxwkhr.png
    e2eixe561s4u.png

  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Grab the paperwork for the compressor. Look for something called a grill or shroud or cover for the fan. Other fan grills I see are under $100 US.

  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    That looks pretty easy to fix if you can find a replacement fan grille. Just hope nothing broke when the fan fell inside the unit.

    Not sure if this is the right part for your unit but it looks similar.

    https://controlscentral.com/tabid/63/ProductID/713213/lennox-parts-37k62-top-panel.aspx?gclid=Cj0KCQjw37iTBhCWARIsACBt1IyM7CC7Mx_aPL0nWs63HEau_EKv0OlnE7k2yA8mxabbDhXAWOgeCNAaAhfVEALw_wcB

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
    Pailryder
  • rndmherorndmhero Registered User regular
    Tamper resistant electrical outlets are the worst. A pox on whoever invented these damn things.

    MichaelLCAbsoluteZeroStarZapper
  • y2jake215y2jake215 certified Flat Birther theorist the Last Good Boy onlineRegistered User regular
    3k1vi2ufpjuz.jpeg

    So these things on my screen/storm door are busted. They’re the buffer things that keep the screen/glass panel firmly in place. A couple were having issues staying in, then one got crushed when the wind blew the door open and now they’re toast. Does anyone know how to get replacements? The guy at Lowe’s said the door should have a serial number and they could order more based on that, but I can’t find a serial anywhere on it. I don’t even know what to call these things.

    C8Ft8GE.jpg
    maybe i'm streaming terrible dj right now if i am its here
    zepherin
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava Call me Ahava ~~She/Her~~ Move to New ZealandRegistered User regular
    If a person were considering building a cat run but on a concrete pad, what would you all say might be a good idea, plan?

  • notyanotya Registered User regular
    you can still drill into the concrete. start building your wood structure. or just make it freestanding and rest on top of the concrete.

    HappylilElfStarZapperElvenshaeGilgaron
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Does anyone have a recommendation for a type / brand of caulk for exterior use, to block pests and moisture from cracks and crevices around the outside of a house?

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • Beyond NormalBeyond Normal Lord Phender Registered User regular
    y2jake215 wrote: »
    image

    So these things on my screen/storm door are busted. They’re the buffer things that keep the screen/glass panel firmly in place. A couple were having issues staying in, then one got crushed when the wind blew the door open and now they’re toast. Does anyone know how to get replacements? The guy at Lowe’s said the door should have a serial number and they could order more based on that, but I can’t find a serial anywhere on it. I don’t even know what to call these things.

    Hello, I'm a millwork specialist for Lowe's. It doesn't look like a part normally installed onto a Larson/Comfortbilt storm door. Do you know the manufacturer of the storm door?

    Also, if you do find the registration number and it IS a Larson door, you can go here: https://parts.larsondoors.com to order parts. Just type in the reg. number and your door will show up with all available parts and pieces. They will even ship direct.

    Battle.net: Phender#1108 -- Steam: Phender -- PS4: Phender12 -- Origin: Phender01
    jmcdonald
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    So, I have about 100k to 150k in equity on my townhome built up. I have this crazy idea to sell my place, buy some land, and start a farm.

    I want to build an aquaponics system and commercially cultivate freshwater prawns (and other pond fish), cannabis (and/or some other cash crop), and personal food crops. All within a modular climate controlled greenhouse system. I have been studying aquaponics and doing small scale experiments with the nitrogen cycle in my planted aquarium. Likewise my planter garden is giving me a lot of practical applied experience is controlled (if not truly hydroponic) growing.
    nad25xrql0ek.png

    I feel like I am at the stage where I could graduate to a full on aquaponics system. But I don't have the space I need to expand my experiments any further. I've used up about all the goodwill my HOA will allow me having a bunch of trashy looking planters in front of my place. If I tried to install a holding tank for fish too, I think they'd stop me.

    It looks like there are a lot of loans and grants available through the USDA for first time farmers. SW Virginia is not all that far from where I am now. They've recently legalized cannabis and are accepting applications for commercial growers. I've even found a few lawyers that specialize in getting you through the legal hurdles. Cannabis is FAR and ahead the most valuable crop I could start with and should easily be able to fund the whole operation. If I get in on the ground floor, right at the start of legalization, I could see very fast growth. Is cannabis is out, herbs, microgreens or strawberries could be good fallbacks. There's this famer in Japan selling single strawberries that go for $450 (EACH). I feel like there could be a market for gourmet strawberries in the US too.

    I just feel like I need a change. I'm on the fence about what to do. Part of me wants to work hard and get another IT job in a big city. A job that would let me afford to live in a walkable urban setting. The other part of me wants to run far far away. To the middle of nowhere. Just give up IT altogether and have a go at farming. Growing a new life for myself, as it were. No longer watching the clock for when I can leave work. Living on my own time and doing my own thing.

    steam_sig.png
    zepherin
  • DoodmannDoodmann Registered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    So, I have about 100k to 150k in equity on my townhome built up. I have this crazy idea to sell my place, buy some land, and start a farm.

    I want to build an aquaponics system and commercially cultivate freshwater prawns (and other pond fish), cannabis (and/or some other cash crop), and personal food crops. All within a modular climate controlled greenhouse system. I have been studying aquaponics and doing small scale experiments with the nitrogen cycle in my planted aquarium. Likewise my planter garden is giving me a lot of practical applied experience is controlled (if not truly hydroponic) growing.
    nad25xrql0ek.png

    I feel like I am at the stage where I could graduate to a full on aquaponics system. But I don't have the space I need to expand my experiments any further. I've used up about all the goodwill my HOA will allow me having a bunch of trashy looking planters in front of my place. If I tried to install a holding tank for fish too, I think they'd stop me.

    It looks like there are a lot of loans and grants available through the USDA for first time farmers. SW Virginia is not all that far from where I am now. They've recently legalized cannabis and are accepting applications for commercial growers. I've even found a few lawyers that specialize in getting you through the legal hurdles. Cannabis is FAR and ahead the most valuable crop I could start with and should easily be able to fund the whole operation. If I get in on the ground floor, right at the start of legalization, I could see very fast growth. Is cannabis is out, herbs, microgreens or strawberries could be good fallbacks. There's this famer in Japan selling single strawberries that go for $450 (EACH). I feel like there could be a market for gourmet strawberries in the US too.

    I just feel like I need a change. I'm on the fence about what to do. Part of me wants to work hard and get another IT job in a big city. A job that would let me afford to live in a walkable urban setting. The other part of me wants to run far far away. To the middle of nowhere. Just give up IT altogether and have a go at farming. Growing a new life for myself, as it were. No longer watching the clock for when I can leave work. Living on my own time and doing my own thing.

    If you're looking for a change you could always try it as regular business with a loan and shit, I hear there is a lot of light industrial/commercial real estate just sitting around these days.

    Check this guy out. https://www.transparentseafarm.com/

    That japanese farmer is a complete outlier, it's art not produce. That's basically like saying your plan is to become famous.

    Whippy wrote: »
    nope nope nope nope abort abort talk about anime
    Help me Marie Kondo my life and buy my old stuff
    CptHamiltonGilgaronzepherinrndmheroDaenris
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    Doodmann wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    So, I have about 100k to 150k in equity on my townhome built up. I have this crazy idea to sell my place, buy some land, and start a farm.

    I want to build an aquaponics system and commercially cultivate freshwater prawns (and other pond fish), cannabis (and/or some other cash crop), and personal food crops. All within a modular climate controlled greenhouse system. I have been studying aquaponics and doing small scale experiments with the nitrogen cycle in my planted aquarium. Likewise my planter garden is giving me a lot of practical applied experience is controlled (if not truly hydroponic) growing.
    nad25xrql0ek.png

    I feel like I am at the stage where I could graduate to a full on aquaponics system. But I don't have the space I need to expand my experiments any further. I've used up about all the goodwill my HOA will allow me having a bunch of trashy looking planters in front of my place. If I tried to install a holding tank for fish too, I think they'd stop me.

    It looks like there are a lot of loans and grants available through the USDA for first time farmers. SW Virginia is not all that far from where I am now. They've recently legalized cannabis and are accepting applications for commercial growers. I've even found a few lawyers that specialize in getting you through the legal hurdles. Cannabis is FAR and ahead the most valuable crop I could start with and should easily be able to fund the whole operation. If I get in on the ground floor, right at the start of legalization, I could see very fast growth. Is cannabis is out, herbs, microgreens or strawberries could be good fallbacks. There's this famer in Japan selling single strawberries that go for $450 (EACH). I feel like there could be a market for gourmet strawberries in the US too.

    I just feel like I need a change. I'm on the fence about what to do. Part of me wants to work hard and get another IT job in a big city. A job that would let me afford to live in a walkable urban setting. The other part of me wants to run far far away. To the middle of nowhere. Just give up IT altogether and have a go at farming. Growing a new life for myself, as it were. No longer watching the clock for when I can leave work. Living on my own time and doing my own thing.

    If you're looking for a change you could always try it as regular business with a loan and shit, I hear there is a lot of light industrial/commercial real estate just sitting around these days.

    Check this guy out. https://www.transparentseafarm.com/

    That japanese farmer is a complete outlier, it's art not produce. That's basically like saying your plan is to become famous.

    Well obviously I don't expect to sell individual strawberries like he does but I feel like there should be room in the market for upscale strawberries. And that would only be if cannabis isn't viable.

    I like what the guys at Transparent Sea Farms are doing. I definitely would like to make a business out of it. The USDA loans I was talking about would be a great way to make that happen. My townhome is already financed through a USDA program (so I'm in their system), my credit is great and I have all that home equity so I feel like I would have a good shot at getting a sizeable loan to start operations.

    My idea is to start with one of those 12ft x 45ft sized metal frame polycarbonate greenhouses on a plot of land at least 5 acres. I would fill most of the greenhouse with grow beds and stock tanks. I'd need to do some math to know the exact amount of grow bed per stock tank but I think I think I could get quite a sizable operation going with just a single greenhouse. My understanding of the general rule of thumb is you can do 1 cubic foot of grow bed per 1lb of fish in 5 gallons of water. One of those 3000 gallon stock tanks should be sufficient for an entire greenhouse. I could have 600lbs of fish feeding 600 square feet of grow beds.

    I own a pretty nice camper so I wouldn't even need to build a house early on. Just get power septic and water hookups. Almost all of my seed money could go into the greenhouse.

    steam_sig.png
  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    Does anyone have a recommendation for a type / brand of caulk for exterior use, to block pests and moisture from cracks and crevices around the outside of a house?

    oddly enough i've been investigating this myself as we have red mites coming in near the front door. this is what i've found that i'm about to try.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MQW8AEM/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

    AbsoluteZero
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Doodmann wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    So, I have about 100k to 150k in equity on my townhome built up. I have this crazy idea to sell my place, buy some land, and start a farm.

    I want to build an aquaponics system and commercially cultivate freshwater prawns (and other pond fish), cannabis (and/or some other cash crop), and personal food crops. All within a modular climate controlled greenhouse system. I have been studying aquaponics and doing small scale experiments with the nitrogen cycle in my planted aquarium. Likewise my planter garden is giving me a lot of practical applied experience is controlled (if not truly hydroponic) growing.
    nad25xrql0ek.png

    I feel like I am at the stage where I could graduate to a full on aquaponics system. But I don't have the space I need to expand my experiments any further. I've used up about all the goodwill my HOA will allow me having a bunch of trashy looking planters in front of my place. If I tried to install a holding tank for fish too, I think they'd stop me.

    It looks like there are a lot of loans and grants available through the USDA for first time farmers. SW Virginia is not all that far from where I am now. They've recently legalized cannabis and are accepting applications for commercial growers. I've even found a few lawyers that specialize in getting you through the legal hurdles. Cannabis is FAR and ahead the most valuable crop I could start with and should easily be able to fund the whole operation. If I get in on the ground floor, right at the start of legalization, I could see very fast growth. Is cannabis is out, herbs, microgreens or strawberries could be good fallbacks. There's this famer in Japan selling single strawberries that go for $450 (EACH). I feel like there could be a market for gourmet strawberries in the US too.

    I just feel like I need a change. I'm on the fence about what to do. Part of me wants to work hard and get another IT job in a big city. A job that would let me afford to live in a walkable urban setting. The other part of me wants to run far far away. To the middle of nowhere. Just give up IT altogether and have a go at farming. Growing a new life for myself, as it were. No longer watching the clock for when I can leave work. Living on my own time and doing my own thing.

    If you're looking for a change you could always try it as regular business with a loan and shit, I hear there is a lot of light industrial/commercial real estate just sitting around these days.

    Check this guy out. https://www.transparentseafarm.com/

    That japanese farmer is a complete outlier, it's art not produce. That's basically like saying your plan is to become famous.

    Well obviously I don't expect to sell individual strawberries like he does but I feel like there should be room in the market for upscale strawberries. And that would only be if cannabis isn't viable.

    I like what the guys at Transparent Sea Farms are doing. I definitely would like to make a business out of it. The USDA loans I was talking about would be a great way to make that happen. My townhome is already financed through a USDA program (so I'm in their system), my credit is great and I have all that home equity so I feel like I would have a good shot at getting a sizeable loan to start operations.

    My idea is to start with one of those 12ft x 45ft sized metal frame polycarbonate greenhouses on a plot of land at least 5 acres. I would fill most of the greenhouse with grow beds and stock tanks. I'd need to do some math to know the exact amount of grow bed per stock tank but I think I think I could get quite a sizable operation going with just a single greenhouse. My understanding of the general rule of thumb is you can do 1 cubic foot of grow bed per 1lb of fish in 5 gallons of water. One of those 3000 gallon stock tanks should be sufficient for an entire greenhouse. I could have 600lbs of fish feeding 600 square feet of grow beds.

    I own a pretty nice camper so I wouldn't even need to build a house early on. Just get power septic and water hookups. Almost all of my seed money could go into the greenhouse.

    600 sqft doesn't seem like a lot of any plant other than maybe weed. Like, there's a farm down the street from me who do that whole 'pick your own strawberries' thing and I don't know how many sqft their strawberry field is but it's a lot more than 600. But I also have no idea how one goes from "not a farmer" to "farmer selling produce not just out of a stall at the farmer's market". So what I'm saying here is I'd read your blog about building a fish + pot farm.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    Doodmannlonelyahava
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    edited May 2
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Doodmann wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    So, I have about 100k to 150k in equity on my townhome built up. I have this crazy idea to sell my place, buy some land, and start a farm.

    I want to build an aquaponics system and commercially cultivate freshwater prawns (and other pond fish), cannabis (and/or some other cash crop), and personal food crops. All within a modular climate controlled greenhouse system. I have been studying aquaponics and doing small scale experiments with the nitrogen cycle in my planted aquarium. Likewise my planter garden is giving me a lot of practical applied experience is controlled (if not truly hydroponic) growing.
    nad25xrql0ek.png

    I feel like I am at the stage where I could graduate to a full on aquaponics system. But I don't have the space I need to expand my experiments any further. I've used up about all the goodwill my HOA will allow me having a bunch of trashy looking planters in front of my place. If I tried to install a holding tank for fish too, I think they'd stop me.

    It looks like there are a lot of loans and grants available through the USDA for first time farmers. SW Virginia is not all that far from where I am now. They've recently legalized cannabis and are accepting applications for commercial growers. I've even found a few lawyers that specialize in getting you through the legal hurdles. Cannabis is FAR and ahead the most valuable crop I could start with and should easily be able to fund the whole operation. If I get in on the ground floor, right at the start of legalization, I could see very fast growth. Is cannabis is out, herbs, microgreens or strawberries could be good fallbacks. There's this famer in Japan selling single strawberries that go for $450 (EACH). I feel like there could be a market for gourmet strawberries in the US too.

    I just feel like I need a change. I'm on the fence about what to do. Part of me wants to work hard and get another IT job in a big city. A job that would let me afford to live in a walkable urban setting. The other part of me wants to run far far away. To the middle of nowhere. Just give up IT altogether and have a go at farming. Growing a new life for myself, as it were. No longer watching the clock for when I can leave work. Living on my own time and doing my own thing.

    If you're looking for a change you could always try it as regular business with a loan and shit, I hear there is a lot of light industrial/commercial real estate just sitting around these days.

    Check this guy out. https://www.transparentseafarm.com/

    That japanese farmer is a complete outlier, it's art not produce. That's basically like saying your plan is to become famous.

    Well obviously I don't expect to sell individual strawberries like he does but I feel like there should be room in the market for upscale strawberries. And that would only be if cannabis isn't viable.

    I like what the guys at Transparent Sea Farms are doing. I definitely would like to make a business out of it. The USDA loans I was talking about would be a great way to make that happen. My townhome is already financed through a USDA program (so I'm in their system), my credit is great and I have all that home equity so I feel like I would have a good shot at getting a sizeable loan to start operations.

    My idea is to start with one of those 12ft x 45ft sized metal frame polycarbonate greenhouses on a plot of land at least 5 acres. I would fill most of the greenhouse with grow beds and stock tanks. I'd need to do some math to know the exact amount of grow bed per stock tank but I think I think I could get quite a sizable operation going with just a single greenhouse. My understanding of the general rule of thumb is you can do 1 cubic foot of grow bed per 1lb of fish in 5 gallons of water. One of those 3000 gallon stock tanks should be sufficient for an entire greenhouse. I could have 600lbs of fish feeding 600 square feet of grow beds.

    I own a pretty nice camper so I wouldn't even need to build a house early on. Just get power septic and water hookups. Almost all of my seed money could go into the greenhouse.

    600 sqft doesn't seem like a lot of any plant other than maybe weed. Like, there's a farm down the street from me who do that whole 'pick your own strawberries' thing and I don't know how many sqft their strawberry field is but it's a lot more than 600. But I also have no idea how one goes from "not a farmer" to "farmer selling produce not just out of a stall at the farmer's market". So what I'm saying here is I'd read your blog about building a fish + pot farm.

    Hydroponic grow system have much higher yields per square foot than traditional farming. As much as 3x but a safer figure is about double. Still not a lot but it's a start. My plan is to add more greenhouses down the line. I did some rough napkin math and 600 sqft of hydroponic cannabis grow bed space should yield about $42,000 per harvest at current California wholesale prices. If I can get a full 4 harvests a year, that's quite the foundation to build a farm on.

    That_Guy on
    steam_sig.png
  • SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited May 2
    That_Guy wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    Doodmann wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    So, I have about 100k to 150k in equity on my townhome built up. I have this crazy idea to sell my place, buy some land, and start a farm.

    I want to build an aquaponics system and commercially cultivate freshwater prawns (and other pond fish), cannabis (and/or some other cash crop), and personal food crops. All within a modular climate controlled greenhouse system. I have been studying aquaponics and doing small scale experiments with the nitrogen cycle in my planted aquarium. Likewise my planter garden is giving me a lot of practical applied experience is controlled (if not truly hydroponic) growing.
    nad25xrql0ek.png

    I feel like I am at the stage where I could graduate to a full on aquaponics system. But I don't have the space I need to expand my experiments any further. I've used up about all the goodwill my HOA will allow me having a bunch of trashy looking planters in front of my place. If I tried to install a holding tank for fish too, I think they'd stop me.

    It looks like there are a lot of loans and grants available through the USDA for first time farmers. SW Virginia is not all that far from where I am now. They've recently legalized cannabis and are accepting applications for commercial growers. I've even found a few lawyers that specialize in getting you through the legal hurdles. Cannabis is FAR and ahead the most valuable crop I could start with and should easily be able to fund the whole operation. If I get in on the ground floor, right at the start of legalization, I could see very fast growth. Is cannabis is out, herbs, microgreens or strawberries could be good fallbacks. There's this famer in Japan selling single strawberries that go for $450 (EACH). I feel like there could be a market for gourmet strawberries in the US too.

    I just feel like I need a change. I'm on the fence about what to do. Part of me wants to work hard and get another IT job in a big city. A job that would let me afford to live in a walkable urban setting. The other part of me wants to run far far away. To the middle of nowhere. Just give up IT altogether and have a go at farming. Growing a new life for myself, as it were. No longer watching the clock for when I can leave work. Living on my own time and doing my own thing.

    If you're looking for a change you could always try it as regular business with a loan and shit, I hear there is a lot of light industrial/commercial real estate just sitting around these days.

    Check this guy out. https://www.transparentseafarm.com/

    That japanese farmer is a complete outlier, it's art not produce. That's basically like saying your plan is to become famous.

    Well obviously I don't expect to sell individual strawberries like he does but I feel like there should be room in the market for upscale strawberries. And that would only be if cannabis isn't viable.

    I like what the guys at Transparent Sea Farms are doing. I definitely would like to make a business out of it. The USDA loans I was talking about would be a great way to make that happen. My townhome is already financed through a USDA program (so I'm in their system), my credit is great and I have all that home equity so I feel like I would have a good shot at getting a sizeable loan to start operations.

    My idea is to start with one of those 12ft x 45ft sized metal frame polycarbonate greenhouses on a plot of land at least 5 acres. I would fill most of the greenhouse with grow beds and stock tanks. I'd need to do some math to know the exact amount of grow bed per stock tank but I think I think I could get quite a sizable operation going with just a single greenhouse. My understanding of the general rule of thumb is you can do 1 cubic foot of grow bed per 1lb of fish in 5 gallons of water. One of those 3000 gallon stock tanks should be sufficient for an entire greenhouse. I could have 600lbs of fish feeding 600 square feet of grow beds.

    I own a pretty nice camper so I wouldn't even need to build a house early on. Just get power septic and water hookups. Almost all of my seed money could go into the greenhouse.

    600 sqft doesn't seem like a lot of any plant other than maybe weed. Like, there's a farm down the street from me who do that whole 'pick your own strawberries' thing and I don't know how many sqft their strawberry field is but it's a lot more than 600. But I also have no idea how one goes from "not a farmer" to "farmer selling produce not just out of a stall at the farmer's market". So what I'm saying here is I'd read your blog about building a fish + pot farm.

    Hydroponic grow system have much higher yields per square foot than traditional farming. As much as 3x but a safer figure is about double. Still not a lot but it's a start. My plan is to add more greenhouses down the line. I did some rough napkin math and 600 sqft of hydroponic cannabis grow bed space should yield about $42,000 per harvest at current California wholesale prices. If I can get a full 4 harvests a year, that's quite the foundation to build a farm on.

    But what's the expenses on those 4 full harvests? I feel like if measly 600sq ft of hydro hot house grow space could easily generate $160k+ in a year, private equity would have already exploded the market on it.

    Simpsonia on
    Doodmann
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    That_Guy wrote: »
    So, I have about 100k to 150k in equity on my townhome built up. I have this crazy idea to sell my place, buy some land, and start a farm.

    I want to build an aquaponics system and commercially cultivate freshwater prawns (and other pond fish), cannabis (and/or some other cash crop), and personal food crops. All within a modular climate controlled greenhouse system. I have been studying aquaponics and doing small scale experiments with the nitrogen cycle in my planted aquarium. Likewise my planter garden is giving me a lot of practical applied experience is controlled (if not truly hydroponic) growing.
    nad25xrql0ek.png

    I feel like I am at the stage where I could graduate to a full on aquaponics system. But I don't have the space I need to expand my experiments any further. I've used up about all the goodwill my HOA will allow me having a bunch of trashy looking planters in front of my place. If I tried to install a holding tank for fish too, I think they'd stop me.

    It looks like there are a lot of loans and grants available through the USDA for first time farmers. SW Virginia is not all that far from where I am now. They've recently legalized cannabis and are accepting applications for commercial growers. I've even found a few lawyers that specialize in getting you through the legal hurdles. Cannabis is FAR and ahead the most valuable crop I could start with and should easily be able to fund the whole operation. If I get in on the ground floor, right at the start of legalization, I could see very fast growth. Is cannabis is out, herbs, microgreens or strawberries could be good fallbacks. There's this famer in Japan selling single strawberries that go for $450 (EACH). I feel like there could be a market for gourmet strawberries in the US too.

    I just feel like I need a change. I'm on the fence about what to do. Part of me wants to work hard and get another IT job in a big city. A job that would let me afford to live in a walkable urban setting. The other part of me wants to run far far away. To the middle of nowhere. Just give up IT altogether and have a go at farming. Growing a new life for myself, as it were. No longer watching the clock for when I can leave work. Living on my own time and doing my own thing.
    Cannabis compound sounds like it’s more fun, but much higher risk than IT.

    Mvrck
  • evilmrhenryevilmrhenry Registered User regular
    The topic of whether or not to run away from home and become a pot farmer seems a bit off-topic, but in general, I'd recommend at least speaking to someone who's doing something similar to figure out where the actual problems are. My sense is that, like any business, you should have enough savings that you can afford to not make money for a few years, and farming is not the easiest way to make money.

    OneAngryPossumEtheaPailryderTrajan45CptHamiltonSyngyneElvenshaerndmheroVishNubMvrck
  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    in california, i would guess cost and availability of water will be a huge factor.

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Pailryder wrote: »
    in california, i would guess cost and availability of water will be a huge factor.

    I believe they said W. Virginia? I'm guessing the California reference was for "what do people pay for pot, on a wholesale scale, once it's legal?"


    Unrelated: how much liquid does it require to make a wet streak in sheetrock? And at what point do you need to cut it out and patch it, versus let it dry and paint over the stain?

    I mad a gallon or so of sangria yesterday. My wife left the tap on the jug not-quite-closed in the fridge, prompting slightly less than one gallon of sangria to leak out of the jug into the fridge, then onto the floor. Today there's a long wet spot on the ceiling in the basement below said fridge. I feel like less than a gallon of liquid will probably evaporate before mold grows...but with all the sugar in sangria I'm not certain.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    The time after the alcohol flashed off but before too much water evaporated out to drop the water activity down to where the sugar is a preservative is probably not a mold issue. It's really hard to say definitively but I personally wouldn't worry about cutting it out if it wasn't clearly structurally compromised by the moisture.

    Water activity as a concept for microbial growth: https://www.metergroup.com/en/meter-food/expertise-library/microbial-growth#:~:text=Control water activity, prevent microbial growth&text=When water activity outside the,grow enough to cause infection.

    Its essentially why jelly will last forever in the fridge and even if it does manage to mold at room temp, the colonies are only ever up on the top where the water fraction separated out.

    Red Raevyn
  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against Russian warships) Registered User regular
    The hydroponics discussion reminded me of something - if the townhouse inspection doesn't go completely pear-shaped tomorrow, I'm going to have space to setup my 55 gallon fish tank again. I've been kicking around the idea for a couple of years to get one of those tank top hydroponics kits and have some fun growing a small assortment of flowers, maybe shiso pants, or other small edible vegetable producers.

    Does anyone have experience with any of those setups, or tried something similar themselves?

  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Pot farming right now is a race to the bottom as industrial grows can achieve much lower costs and most dispensaries are looking to pad their margins.
    The only way it's long term viable is if you exploit the niche to build a premium brand that can hold costs because the demand is there.
    The other challenge in many areas is a limited pipeline of grow licenses and process, as you must be blessed by the state to sell to anyone. Also,hope you have a war chest as currently any pot related thing shuts you out of normal banking.

    Trajan45GilgaronzepherinDoodmannBullheadswaylowThegreatcow
  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against Russian warships) Registered User regular
    I shadowed the inspector while he did his thing yesterday as he went over the townhouse top to bottom and it's essentially everything you'd expect from an adequately cared for home built in '72. I'm going to need to figure out what it'll take to add an attic access in the second floor foyer, because trying to get through the 12"x24" hatch above a shelf in a closet was total bullshit. One basement wall tripped the moisture detector, right beneath where the planter by the front door is, so that's probably retaining a lot more water than it should, but there was no bubbling, wall deformation, dampness, or anything else on the interior. That, and noticing that the garage door opener was plugged into an extension cord were the worst things the inspection turned up.

    So... I guess I've lost my last excuse to back out. XD

    This might be a question for the financial thread, but I'm looking at closing costs and how that's going to cut into my remaining money cushion - I can't roll them into the mortgage, but is there anything else I might be able to do cut down what I pay out of pocket? I'm willing to tradeoff 'pay more money over time' for 'having more immediate funds upfront if needed.'

  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    I shadowed the inspector while he did his thing yesterday as he went over the townhouse top to bottom and it's essentially everything you'd expect from an adequately cared for home built in '72. I'm going to need to figure out what it'll take to add an attic access in the second floor foyer, because trying to get through the 12"x24" hatch above a shelf in a closet was total bullshit. One basement wall tripped the moisture detector, right beneath where the planter by the front door is, so that's probably retaining a lot more water than it should, but there was no bubbling, wall deformation, dampness, or anything else on the interior. That, and noticing that the garage door opener was plugged into an extension cord were the worst things the inspection turned up.

    So... I guess I've lost my last excuse to back out. XD

    This might be a question for the financial thread, but I'm looking at closing costs and how that's going to cut into my remaining money cushion - I can't roll them into the mortgage, but is there anything else I might be able to do cut down what I pay out of pocket? I'm willing to tradeoff 'pay more money over time' for 'having more immediate funds upfront if needed.'
    Since the house is under contract, that’s tricky. I would have offered 10k more in exchange for the seller paying an extra 10k of closing costs.

    You can wait till your credit score increases after you close and take out a personal line of credit from your credit union/bank to cover any emergencies.

    Gilgaron
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    There's a pretty decent gap between the concrete front steps of my house and the house's foundation. Looks like a potential entry point for pests. Any reason I shouldn't seal that gap? It doesn't look like anyone has ever tried to seal it before (house was built in 1959) which makes me think maybe there's a reason it's been left open, like to allow water to escape?

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    There's a pretty decent gap between the concrete front steps of my house and the house's foundation. Looks like a potential entry point for pests. Any reason I shouldn't seal that gap? It doesn't look like anyone has ever tried to seal it before (house was built in 1959) which makes me think maybe there's a reason it's been left open, like to allow water to escape?
    Weep holes are usually for brick, concrete is porous so you usually don’t need anything like that. Also I’m guessing the gap is a higher elevation than your basement, water goes downhill. Almost always.

    Seal that.

    GilgaronMugsleyjmcdonaldMichaelLCAbsoluteZeroElvenshae
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    Make sure you use something that has some flex to it, like some form of caulk/putty

    jmcdonaldzepherinGilgaronAbsoluteZeroElvenshae
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    There's a pretty decent gap between the concrete front steps of my house and the house's foundation. Looks like a potential entry point for pests. Any reason I shouldn't seal that gap? It doesn't look like anyone has ever tried to seal it before (house was built in 1959) which makes me think maybe there's a reason it's been left open, like to allow water to escape?

    Sounds like you're describing the typical one-piece concrete steps that are just set in place next to the foundation? If so, there aren't any extra "entry points" behind the steps to seal, what's behind there is just the same as the rest of your solid foundation. In my opinion the only particular reason to seal the gap is so you don't drop your keys in it. Or maybe to keep things like small rabbits from using it as a hiding spot.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
    Elvenshae
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    There's a pretty decent gap between the concrete front steps of my house and the house's foundation. Looks like a potential entry point for pests. Any reason I shouldn't seal that gap? It doesn't look like anyone has ever tried to seal it before (house was built in 1959) which makes me think maybe there's a reason it's been left open, like to allow water to escape?

    Sounds like you're describing the typical one-piece concrete steps that are just set in place next to the foundation? If so, there aren't any extra "entry points" behind the steps to seal, what's behind there is just the same as the rest of your solid foundation. In my opinion the only particular reason to seal the gap is so you don't drop your keys in it. Or maybe to keep things like small rabbits from using it as a hiding spot.
    You don’t want water infiltration into that gap. If water can get back there when it rains it will slowly eat the concrete away.

    Gilgaron
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    There's a pretty decent gap between the concrete front steps of my house and the house's foundation. Looks like a potential entry point for pests. Any reason I shouldn't seal that gap? It doesn't look like anyone has ever tried to seal it before (house was built in 1959) which makes me think maybe there's a reason it's been left open, like to allow water to escape?

    Sounds like you're describing the typical one-piece concrete steps that are just set in place next to the foundation? If so, there aren't any extra "entry points" behind the steps to seal, what's behind there is just the same as the rest of your solid foundation. In my opinion the only particular reason to seal the gap is so you don't drop your keys in it. Or maybe to keep things like small rabbits from using it as a hiding spot.
    You don’t want water infiltration into that gap. If water can get back there when it rains it will slowly eat the concrete away.

    Water isn't just going to dissolve concrete unless you've got some major acid rain in your area or you're leaving loads of salt on it all the time. And any water that might happen get in the gap between foundation and steps that doesn't simply run out either side will just soak into the sand and dirt under the steps.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    edited May 5
    zepherin wrote: »
    There's a pretty decent gap between the concrete front steps of my house and the house's foundation. Looks like a potential entry point for pests. Any reason I shouldn't seal that gap? It doesn't look like anyone has ever tried to seal it before (house was built in 1959) which makes me think maybe there's a reason it's been left open, like to allow water to escape?

    Sounds like you're describing the typical one-piece concrete steps that are just set in place next to the foundation? If so, there aren't any extra "entry points" behind the steps to seal, what's behind there is just the same as the rest of your solid foundation. In my opinion the only particular reason to seal the gap is so you don't drop your keys in it. Or maybe to keep things like small rabbits from using it as a hiding spot.
    You don’t want water infiltration into that gap. If water can get back there when it rains it will slowly eat the concrete away.

    Water isn't just going to dissolve concrete unless you've got some major acid rain in your area or you're leaving loads of salt on it all the time. And any water that might happen get in the gap between foundation and steps that doesn't simply run out either side will just soak into the sand and dirt under the steps.
    Concrete is caustic, water running against it raises the ph of the water making it more damaging, and water infiltration but it’s not about dissolving the concrete it’s about slow erosion of concrete.

    Also water infiltration into the dirt around the foundation is terrible, and water infiltration into a basement which is annoying.
    jwe5mhu0mmvn.jpeg


    Especially since water proofing the crack can be accomplished for less than 20 bucks. Maybe even less than 10.

    zepherin on
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    Yeah it won't be any more of an issue than it is anywhere else along the foundation unless there's standing water for some reason.

    Probably still a good idea to seal it up at some point anyways though since burrowing critters tend to find places that have a narrow entrance and a handy built in concrete roof to be great places to dig themselves a home which can lead to standing water that you won't even know about.

    Elvenshae
  • Gabriel_PittGabriel_Pitt (effective against Russian warships) Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    I shadowed the inspector while he did his thing yesterday as he went over the townhouse top to bottom and it's essentially everything you'd expect from an adequately cared for home built in '72. I'm going to need to figure out what it'll take to add an attic access in the second floor foyer, because trying to get through the 12"x24" hatch above a shelf in a closet was total bullshit. One basement wall tripped the moisture detector, right beneath where the planter by the front door is, so that's probably retaining a lot more water than it should, but there was no bubbling, wall deformation, dampness, or anything else on the interior. That, and noticing that the garage door opener was plugged into an extension cord were the worst things the inspection turned up.

    So... I guess I've lost my last excuse to back out. XD

    This might be a question for the financial thread, but I'm looking at closing costs and how that's going to cut into my remaining money cushion - I can't roll them into the mortgage, but is there anything else I might be able to do cut down what I pay out of pocket? I'm willing to tradeoff 'pay more money over time' for 'having more immediate funds upfront if needed.'
    Since the house is under contract, that’s tricky. I would have offered 10k more in exchange for the seller paying an extra 10k of closing costs.

    You can wait till your credit score increases after you close and take out a personal line of credit from your credit union/bank to cover any emergencies.

    That's what I thought - I'll have enough of a cushion left that unless it's a true emergency, like that water heater pressure rockets through the roof, taking out the stove, furnace, and air con on its way through, I'll have to do something like that, but for 'normal' emergencies, and turning my aquarium into an aquaponics setup that lets me enjoy fresh strawberries all year long, the rest of my nest egg will suffice.

    I was just thinking, I KNOW that ten year from now Gabe will be more than happy to have been paying more mortgage overall in exchange for NowGabe (also known as BestGabe) to have some extra cash on hand.

    zepherin
  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    edited May 5
    zepherin wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    There's a pretty decent gap between the concrete front steps of my house and the house's foundation. Looks like a potential entry point for pests. Any reason I shouldn't seal that gap? It doesn't look like anyone has ever tried to seal it before (house was built in 1959) which makes me think maybe there's a reason it's been left open, like to allow water to escape?

    Sounds like you're describing the typical one-piece concrete steps that are just set in place next to the foundation? If so, there aren't any extra "entry points" behind the steps to seal, what's behind there is just the same as the rest of your solid foundation. In my opinion the only particular reason to seal the gap is so you don't drop your keys in it. Or maybe to keep things like small rabbits from using it as a hiding spot.
    You don’t want water infiltration into that gap. If water can get back there when it rains it will slowly eat the concrete away.

    Water isn't just going to dissolve concrete unless you've got some major acid rain in your area or you're leaving loads of salt on it all the time. And any water that might happen get in the gap between foundation and steps that doesn't simply run out either side will just soak into the sand and dirt under the steps.
    Concrete is caustic, water running against it raises the ph of the water making it more damaging, and water infiltration but it’s not about dissolving the concrete it’s about slow erosion of concrete.

    Also water infiltration into the dirt around the foundation is terrible, and water infiltration into a basement which is annoying.
    jwe5mhu0mmvn.jpeg


    Especially since water proofing the crack can be accomplished for less than 20 bucks. Maybe even less than 10.

    If it's a solid set of concrete stairs that was put in place and not a poured set of concrete stairs that was originally part of the foundation there is no crack to water proof.

    It just means the stairs settled away from the house a bit which is pretty common.

    If the stairs were poured as part of the foundation (which isn't common these days but definitely not impossible) then yes they're going to want to seal any cracks.

    HappylilElf on
    StarZapperElvenshae
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    There's a pretty decent gap between the concrete front steps of my house and the house's foundation. Looks like a potential entry point for pests. Any reason I shouldn't seal that gap? It doesn't look like anyone has ever tried to seal it before (house was built in 1959) which makes me think maybe there's a reason it's been left open, like to allow water to escape?

    Sounds like you're describing the typical one-piece concrete steps that are just set in place next to the foundation? If so, there aren't any extra "entry points" behind the steps to seal, what's behind there is just the same as the rest of your solid foundation. In my opinion the only particular reason to seal the gap is so you don't drop your keys in it. Or maybe to keep things like small rabbits from using it as a hiding spot.
    You don’t want water infiltration into that gap. If water can get back there when it rains it will slowly eat the concrete away.

    Water isn't just going to dissolve concrete unless you've got some major acid rain in your area or you're leaving loads of salt on it all the time. And any water that might happen get in the gap between foundation and steps that doesn't simply run out either side will just soak into the sand and dirt under the steps.
    Concrete is caustic, water running against it raises the ph of the water making it more damaging, and water infiltration but it’s not about dissolving the concrete it’s about slow erosion of concrete.

    Also water infiltration into the dirt around the foundation is terrible, and water infiltration into a basement which is annoying.
    jwe5mhu0mmvn.jpeg


    Especially since water proofing the crack can be accomplished for less than 20 bucks. Maybe even less than 10.

    If it's a solid set of concrete stairs that was put in place and not a poured set of concrete stairs that was originally part of the foundation there is no crack to water proof.

    It just means the stairs settled away from the house a bit which is pretty common.

    If the stairs were poured as part of the foundation (which isn't common these days but definitely not impossible) then yes they're going to want to seal any cracks.

    When they said descent gap I was imagining something bigger than a crack, like a half inch or 1 inch separation.

  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    You don't want freezethaws in that gap either, put some backer rod in and then caulk it.

    zepherinAbsoluteZeroElvenshae
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