8x4 foot self portrait

KochikensKochikens Registered User regular
edited April 2008 in Artist's Corner
DSC01587-1.jpg
painting002.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v23/Kochikens/My%20Art/painting010.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v23/Kochikens/My%20Art/painting011.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v23/Kochikens/My%20Art/painting012.jpg


Eight by four feet. Acrylic. 12hours+? Most things in it are deliberate and i'm really quite happy with it, but I thought i'd share to get some feedback. And I know the bench+myself have awful perspective on them, i'm front on and the bench is at an angle. So don't mention that. XD

Was hard to get photos of, and these don't really do it justice. Any advice for taking photos of big paintings?

Kochikens on

Posts

  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    Any advice for taking photos of big paintings?
    Lighting is important. You do not want any sort of reflection on your painting. You can achieve this by having multiple lamps on your painting positioned in such a way that (1) you don't need to use your flash and (2) that they don't give you reflections.

    Then you gotta make sure you've got the complete painting on the picture without messing up the perspective. I guess the easiest way to do this is to take enough distance so that the centre of the painting is in the centre of the picture.

    I think your current pictures convey decently how the painting looks, though. I mean, it can be done better, but this isn't bad at all.

    ---

    Loving the painting, by the way. Really nice colours.

    Aldo on
  • WhardyWhardy Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    I had to take a photo of a similarly huge painting I did and found the best way was to take two or three photos at different heights then stitch them together. You want to eliminate perspective altogether and, by doing this, the illusion of space. Standing back from the painting and using an optical zoom helps as well (don't ask me why but zooming in with a camera reduces the exaggerated curvy perspective effect.)

    Whardy on
  • KochikensKochikens Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    Yeah, no matter where I stood I got a funky curve to it. I'll grab some lamps and try to take multiple photos and stitch them together. Thanks!

    Kochikens on
  • Mortal SkyMortal Sky queer punk hedge witchRegistered User regular
    edited March 2008
    I love it.

    A full size picture would kill most people's internet, but my monitor/bandwidth are big enough I'd sure like it.

    Mortal Sky on
  • SublimusSublimus Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    If you're too close to the subject, its called lens distortion.

    Sublimus on
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