Dungeon pieces

ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
edited September 2008 in Artist's Corner
Heya,
so I've started playing d&d for the first time ever with some friends and decided I could create my own dungeon pieces, loosely based off the DF stuff. The darker one is the master I carved out of plaster by hand and the white piece is one of the copies made from a Silicone mold I created. Ill try to get clearer pictures if theres interest. I also made a few other pieces, maybe ill post later.

cornertileye4.jpg

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Crits on the design or look of the piece would be awsome. Thanks

Ziffelblict on

Posts

  • KatoKato Registered User
    edited August 2008
    Wow. Looks awesome to me...you going to make some straight wall pieces to go with it as well??

    Kato on
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  • ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
    edited August 2008
    Yep, I've made a bunch,,
    4 different 2x2 floor tiles in different styles
    a 2x2 floor with an inside wall
    a 2x2 tile with 2 outside walls, like a hallway
    also some bigger pieces that are harder to explain. Ill post some pictures after work.

    Ziffelblict on
  • NakedZerglingNakedZergling A more apocalyptic post apocalypse Portland OregonRegistered User regular
    edited August 2008
    how did you make the mold?? please tell me!

    NakedZergling on
  • KatoKato Registered User
    edited August 2008
    I'm really curious as to how you did this and how long it took...and about how much money it takes to make some pieces. Those look great...and I'd be interested in making my own depending on how it was done and everything.

    Kato on
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  • ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
    edited August 2008
    well, I'll write up a better work-log with pictures later today. As far as cost, I bought the following things that helped with the process.
    25lbs bag of plaster, $13 (used about half sofar) from home depot
    8lbs Silicone RTV bucket, $121 (used 20 ounces sofar) from tapplastics
    .8lbs Silicone Catalyst, $17 (used 1 ounce sofar) from tapplastics

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M400dj19nUs

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVvGc7VDFvc

    I didn't have to buy because I already had:
    Dremel cutting tools, Various files, chisels, ruler, pencils, pens, legos.

    I spent about 2 hours total in carving that one corner piece, I used the silicone RTV to make the mold. The i used more plaster poured into the mold,, that part takes about 40 minutes per cast.

    Ziffelblict on
  • super...super... __BANNED USERS
    edited August 2008
    nice work!

    i know there is a company that actually sells molds for plaster casting your own terrain. but making your own looks like fun as well.

    from the photos the corner you made looks fine. i would love to see a finished set.

    super... on
  • ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
    edited August 2008
    super... wrote: »
    nice work!

    i know there is a company that actually sells molds for plaster casting your own terrain. but making your own looks like fun as well.

    from the photos the corner you made looks fine. i would love to see a finished set.

    Yep, the 2 big companies are hirstarts and dwarvenforge. Here are some work in progress shots. I still need to paint all these pieces which should add alot more to the look. Functionaly they are good to go.

    You can see the lego's set up here to cast a blank block, 3 different sizes. also notice the blue silicone mold which is creating one of the finished wall pieces.
    img5643iq3.jpg
    .
    Carefully pouring the plaster into the blank mold. you have to bang the table and shake the bubbles to the surface.
    img5645wv9.jpg

    This is De-molding the wall piece. This wall piece was the first piece I made by hand out of a scrap piece of plaster block. I had to saw the block down to size and so the dimentions are close, but not quite exactly perfectly 2inchx2inch. I carved some pretty bad under cuts into the plaster, so not when I demold the wall piece I have to be super careful not to break the part. (i already broke 2 pieces ;/ )
    img5652nu2.jpg

    Here you can see some larger hallway passages, the bigger the piece the longer it takes to carve.
    img5655cr1.jpg

    I'm not even sure if I will end up creating silicone molds out of these larger ones, the mold will use alot more silicone and be pretty exspencive.
    img5660ta9.jpg

    Here is my first ever small dungeon setup just to see how it will work. This is useing all the parts I've casted sofar and also the masters (the darker ones).
    img5662nx6.jpg

    Action shot!
    img5664ky9.jpg

    air elemental? ^^
    img5666oh6.jpg


    I can't wait to play with these for our d&d gameday on friday. They have turned out fairly well, learned a whole lot about casting on this project. I can't wait to paint them up =)

    Ziffelblict on
  • RankenphileRankenphile Passersby were amazed by the unusually large amounts of blood.Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited August 2008
    how do you plan on painting them?

    they look like a perfect opportunity to talk yourself into justifying the purchase of an airbrush

    Rankenphile on
  • ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
    edited August 2008
    Yep I do plan on painting them. maybe with model paints? i really have no idea because i havent painted anything in a long long time. An Airbrush sounds cool, but i dont have any idea how it works, how it looks , or the costs. I'd reallly have to be sold on it. ^^

    Ziffelblict on
  • McGibsMcGibs TorontoRegistered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Id just buy a can of black spray paint, coat them in that, then go to town with a big drybrush to bring out the bricks with grey or brown or whatever (just use cheapy acrylic paints. that much model paint would be ludicrously expensive.) Then get some fake moss stuff and whatnot to add fiddly bits.

    Using an airbrush for this sort of thing would be rather useless.

    McGibs on
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  • RankenphileRankenphile Passersby were amazed by the unusually large amounts of blood.Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited August 2008
    model paints would make this sort of job an exercise in tedium

    what you'll want to do is spray the whole set down with a base color, probably a grey primer.

    you can drybrush (you know what drybrushing is, yes?) a highlight color on it, and this sort of stuff would likely benefit greatly from a dark wash of black and/or chestnut. it will save you a shitload of time versus doing it all by hand

    if you had an airbrush, you could conceivably do a lot of the work faster.

    an airbrush works by firing compressed air through a controlled aperture past a reservoir of paint, pulling it into the stream using gravity or capilary action and atomizing the paint, giving you a smooth controlled stream

    essentially, you'd need the following:
    • an air compressor - I picked a small tank compressor up at a auto parts store for about $80. It's awesome, and I wish I used it more.
    • a regulator/filter - this allows you more careful control over the pressure of your airstream, and helps filter out any moisture or particles that could damage the airbrush. Maybe $40? I don't remember.
    • hoses - these run from the regualtor/moisture trap/filter tot he airbrush. Sometimes airbrushes come with them. Usually not. Maybe $30 from a hobby shop or good art supply store.
    • Airbrush - these range in price and quality and features all over the map. I got a good deal on mine, it has a gravity-fed reservoir that swivels to allow a full bottle reservoir to be attached, and offers pressure-sensitive control over the airstream. It cost me about $150. Simpler models can cost as little as $50, but you won't be able to control shit for the airstream - they're usually on/off. Other models with more features and better quality can cost upwards of $300 or more. Shop around.
    Doing a little research on them will pay off in the long run, if you're interested, and are usually only worth it if you plan on doing a lot with them. They require some cleanup and prep work, so they're not a "pick it up, put it down and you're done" sort of deal, but they're fantastic at what they do and in capable hands they can be used to create some wonderful things.

    Rankenphile on
  • ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
    edited August 2008
    Would it be bad or aginst the rules if i reposted or cross posted (or something) this thread into the Critical Failures forum? I didnt even realise that it exsisted, and they have some great mini and model making threads.

    also, wont have any painted model updates for a few days atleast. ;/

    Ziffelblict on
  • NappuccinoNappuccino Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    I like them quite a bit. It looks like you're building a pretty sweet set up for you and your friends.

    I've always wanted to get into D&D but... none of my friends feel the same way so I always love seeing model building threads for these things.

    Here's hoping the painting goes well.

    Nappuccino on
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  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited August 2008
    Would it be bad or aginst the rules if i reposted or cross posted (or something) this thread into the Critical Failures forum? I didnt even realise that it exsisted, and they have some great mini and model making threads.

    Go to town on that. Lots of us cross-post to other forums. :)

    Also, way to Macgyver-rig that mold! I love it when people do shit like that, haha. Looks great so far (and I second the use of acrylics and dry-brush).

    NightDragon on
  • ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
    edited August 2008
    Pictures update/Action shots!
    dsc00960ow9.jpg
    I'm not happy with how some of the bricks from the flat wall and corner pieces dont line up smoothly;/
    dsc00959zn1.jpg
    These are all the casted and painted pieces i've made so far.
    dsc00955fb2.jpg

    dsc00954bk9.jpg

    dsc00952xj0.jpg

    dsc00961fm8.jpg

    Again crits are welcome, or any tips. I need to cast up about twice as many as are here. Also im going to make the mold for the 2x2 hallway piece. ^^

    Ziffelblict on
  • ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
    edited September 2008
    1. The newly made molds with plaster spacers. These save on silicone and also help in the demolding stage.
    dsc00970pf0.jpg
    2. Here the Spacers are inserted into the molds on the bottom. The molds were cast with both the master piece and the spacer in place during its' creation.
    dsc00975ja1.jpg
    3. The 2 new Molds in a Lego rig. These lego pieces help hold the molds in place while pouring the plaster into them.
    dsc00976lm4.jpg
    4. The lego rig also holds together the corners where the release cuts' are.
    dsc00973wo4.jpg
    5. These greatly increase the demold time, they barely leave any residual mark in the newly casted pieces.
    dsc00972dq6.jpg
    6. The masters and copies.
    dsc00971hw4.jpg
    7. They line up much nicer then my first dungeon pieces because these masters were made with precasted lego blanks which really helped me keep everything lined up.
    dsc00974rg1.jpg
    8. These are the undersides of completed pieces with black felt material glued to the bottoms.
    dsc00977qt0.jpg

    Ziffelblict on
  • InzignaInzigna Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    These are amazing.

    Inzigna on
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  • ZiffelblictZiffelblict Registered User
    edited September 2008
    Back again with some new progress!

    Here I am trying a new method of creating master pieces. More legos! You can see by the picture the lego forms and the supersculpty around them. The process is fairly straightforward. I did end up buying a bunch of sculpty clay and a few specialy tools that I didnt have before for this.

    Build the lego's into the desired size, then cover every side with 1/16th of an inch of sculpty. Each piece should come out to be the correct size we are dealing with, 2" by 2".
    dsc00981js9.jpg

    6 lego dots = 1.7/8th inch.
    dsc00983vm2.jpg

    1/16th of scupty on each side will then make it 2inches perfectly.
    dsc00985eo6.jpg

    5 bricks high is just under 2 inches high. Add about 1/8th inch of sculty material.
    dsc00986es0.jpg

    Building up with lego's and sculpty this way has been a lot different then carving down a larger block from plaster. As always, Lots of fun and about 3 hours of setup and modeling. I plan on using these and the blue siliconeRTV to make some new master molds. I think I will have to use some sort of resin when I do start making casted copies because of the smaller delicate size.

    Ziffelblict on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Those are looking great. I'd like to use this time to suggest priming with Black Gesso. The miniatures community speaks wonders of it, and it's awesome to leave showing in the cracks with a dry overcoat like dude was saying.

    http://www.weetoysoldiers.com/wp/?page_id=34

    ManonvonSuperock on
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