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Getting a new cat (dog door concerns)

MrOlettaMrOletta Registered User
edited March 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
So we're thinking about getting a companion to our little yorkshire terrier, and were mostly looking for a cat, however we're concerned about the cat potentially getting loose or running away due to us having a dog door.

The backyard itself is privacy fenced, and we live in a suburban neighborhood so it isn't terribly high traffic area. The dog door is located in the kitchen, and is the only access to the back yard. We can't fence the cat from going into the kitchen due to the house design being more modern (i.e. not hallways etc) - we have a bar area and there's absolutely no door leading into the kitchen.

Anyway, is this an issue at all? I suppose it depends mostly on the personality? I would hate to have to find out if the cat is going to run away by running away.

We also don't want to isolate them because that defeats the purpose of giving them companionship while we're both away at work.

Anyway, any experiences/thoughts/input?

MrOletta on

Posts

  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited February 2009
    They make dog doors that come with a transmitter that fits on your dog's collar. The door won't open unless the transmitter is near it, allowing the dog to go through but nothing without a transmitter.

    matt has a problem on
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  • mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    we have a dog door and two cats.

    our older cat has gotten out a couple times when it was windy but other than that neither of them have used the door.

    its a test of patience honestly. keep a squirt bottle handy and spray them if they show interest in that. keep on that and eventually they associate the door with getting sprayed. so far it has worked and we have a fairly large door.
    also if you have the covered litter box make sure you take off any doors, you don't want them associating pushing through something with going to the bathroom or else they may figure out the door

    it may also depend on how old the cat your are planning on adopting is. if you adopt an older cat who is used to going outside it will be harder to detrain than a younger cat with no experience

    mts on
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  • mooshoeporkmooshoepork Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    They make dog doors that come with a transmitter that fits on your dog's collar. The door won't open unless the transmitter is near it, allowing the dog to go through but nothing without a transmitter.

    holy shit that is awesome

    mooshoepork on
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I figure I should've at least included a link to the auto door.

    matt has a problem on
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  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS
    edited March 2009
    Cats are generally fine if you get them as a kitten and step up their realm-size gradually. Start with a tiny room, like a bathroom for a week or something, then add the adjoining room, then the house, and after a couple months it should be okay to let the cat out into the yard. It sounds like the cat isn't likely to get out of the yard, and even if it does regardless of what rabid dogs-only types say the cat will have developed affection for you and will know that home is where you are, and will come back on its own. When I lived at my dad's house for a bit while I was working two jobs to build up funds for school I tried to get them to make sure not to let my cat out, but my dad's wife is a drunk and leaves the back door open all the time so my kitty was going out regularly. It wasn't a problem because she always came running back when she heard my Jeep and would sit near my spot on the drive way and come back into the house with me, follow me to my room and curl up next to me while I laid their exhausted from working two shifts.

    The worst that ever happened is sometimes she would bring me presents, but she left them on the back porch instead of bringing them into the house so that's okay. Basically she went out hunting to entertain herself while I was at work and then insisted on cuddling as soon as I got home every day, it was pretty adorable.

    ViolentChemistry on
  • GafotoGafoto Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I figure I should've at least included a link to the auto door.

    That dog is adorable.

    The cat couldn't follow the dog right out could it?

    Gafoto on
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  • RetoxRetox Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Cats are generally fine if you get them as a kitten and step up their realm-size gradually. Start with a tiny room, like a bathroom for a week or something, then add the adjoining room, then the house, and after a couple months it should be okay to let the cat out into the yard. It sounds like the cat isn't likely to get out of the yard, and even if it does regardless of what rabid dogs-only types say the cat will have developed affection for you and will know that home is where you are, and will come back on its own. When I lived at my dad's house for a bit while I was working two jobs to build up funds for school I tried to get them to make sure not to let my cat out, but my dad's wife is a drunk and leaves the back door open all the time so my kitty was going out regularly. It wasn't a problem because she always came running back when she heard my Jeep and would sit near my spot on the drive way and come back into the house with me, follow me to my room and curl up next to me while I laid their exhausted from working two shifts.

    The worst that ever happened is sometimes she would bring me presents, but she left them on the back porch instead of bringing them into the house so that's okay. Basically she went out hunting to entertain herself while I was at work and then insisted on cuddling as soon as I got home every day, it was pretty adorable.

    The only problem is that cats sometimes pick up diseases hunting wild animals. Not every cat will, but it's something to consider. That's how my cat died.

    Retox on
  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS
    edited March 2009
    Retox wrote: »
    Cats are generally fine if you get them as a kitten and step up their realm-size gradually. Start with a tiny room, like a bathroom for a week or something, then add the adjoining room, then the house, and after a couple months it should be okay to let the cat out into the yard. It sounds like the cat isn't likely to get out of the yard, and even if it does regardless of what rabid dogs-only types say the cat will have developed affection for you and will know that home is where you are, and will come back on its own. When I lived at my dad's house for a bit while I was working two jobs to build up funds for school I tried to get them to make sure not to let my cat out, but my dad's wife is a drunk and leaves the back door open all the time so my kitty was going out regularly. It wasn't a problem because she always came running back when she heard my Jeep and would sit near my spot on the drive way and come back into the house with me, follow me to my room and curl up next to me while I laid their exhausted from working two shifts.

    The worst that ever happened is sometimes she would bring me presents, but she left them on the back porch instead of bringing them into the house so that's okay. Basically she went out hunting to entertain herself while I was at work and then insisted on cuddling as soon as I got home every day, it was pretty adorable.

    The only problem is that cats sometimes pick up diseases hunting wild animals. Not every cat will, but it's something to consider. That's how my cat died.

    And sometimes people get hit by cars crossing the street to pick up some milk. "Something bad might happen if I go outside" isn't a terribly healthy philosophy of life, in fact I'm pretty sure it's a psychological disorder.

    ViolentChemistry on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    And sometimes people get hit by cars crossing the street to pick up some milk. "Something bad might happen if I go outside" isn't a terribly healthy philosophy of life, in fact I'm pretty sure it's a psychological disorder.

    I think it's safe to say that there's a big enough difference between an indoor cat going outside and human going outside, that trying to prevent the cat from getting out is a completely reasonable concern. Especially when considering other animals that may be around. :\

    NightDragon on
  • RetoxRetox Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    And sometimes people get hit by cars crossing the street to pick up some milk. "Something bad might happen if I go outside" isn't a terribly healthy philosophy of life, in fact I'm pretty sure it's a psychological disorder.

    You're right, I'm projecting my crippling agoraphobia onto the OP's cat. My bad.

    Retox on
  • ViolentChemistryViolentChemistry __BANNED USERS
    edited March 2009
    And sometimes people get hit by cars crossing the street to pick up some milk. "Something bad might happen if I go outside" isn't a terribly healthy philosophy of life, in fact I'm pretty sure it's a psychological disorder.

    I think it's safe to say that there's a big enough difference between an indoor cat going outside and human going outside, that trying to prevent the cat from getting out is a completely reasonable concern. Especially when considering other animals that may be around. :\

    Cats only become indoor-cats when neurotically paranoid owners force them to be or do vicious things like cut off their fingers.

    ViolentChemistry on
  • DJ-99DJ-99 Registered User
    edited March 2009
    Are you not at all worried about the dog attacking the cat? I'm not too familiar with terriers, and I know they're small, but in general dogs hate cats, unless they are exposed to them at an early age.

    DJ-99 on
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