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Applying for two jobs. At the same time. With the same company.

SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
edited April 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
Real quick:

There are two job positions that opened up at this organization I've always wanted to work for. You all (a) don't need to know the details either of myself or this organization, and (b) probably don't actually care anyway, so I'm just going to give the generic version of the job title and how well qualified I am for each.

(A) Senior Program Officer - Requires a few more years of relevant experience in my field but would be an awesome job. It's national level strategy on a global stage. While the number of years of experience that I bring to the table don't quite match the benchmarks set forth by the posting, the quality of the years I do bring is, I feel, better suited than many other folks who work in my field because I've done more management and organization building.

(B) Program Officer - This one is right in my wheelhouse, it asks for exactly the same number of years as I've worked in this field, it's more tactically-oriented at the local level within a region of the world where I'm already familiar with the local languages, and there isn't a skillset required that I haven't used before in a real-world setting. Unfortunately, though, this is lower in the chain of command and pays less.

Both jobs are based out of the same building in the same city, where I already happen to live.

Here's the thing: I would love to do both jobs, but I also love doing things like saving for retirement and putting my children through college, so if I had a choice, I would definitely go with job A over job B because of the better compensation package. But I also have kind of reached the end of my journey with my current employer and would definitely take job (B) rather than stay on here if given the opportunity. So my prioritized objectives would look like this:

1st -- Apply for and land Job A. Cash in with a stronger salary and a job I would enjoy.
2nd -- Apply for and land Job B. Make about the same amount of money as I do now, but enjoy work more.
3rd -- Don't get either job and stay with my current employer. Be happy I can pay my rent but not enjoy work.

Here's the part with the question:

How can I make sure objectives 1 and 2 are not mutually exclusive during the application process? I have a number of concerns, ranging from etiquette (do I send in one resume, or two? Should I call?) to practical matters (if they know I'm willing to work for the salary of a program officer, and I get the job as a senior program officer, how is that going to impact my ability to negotiate the final salary figure?)

I'm soliciting advice from a lot of different sources; anyone who has been in a similar situation and wants to share their thoughts on the matter, and any HR managers out there, please feel free to share your insight in terms of how I should move forward with a process like this?

Thanks!

SammyF on

Posts

  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Send one resume and make it clear that you're interested in the lesser position if not hired for the senior.

    Happens all the time with my applicants who come in looking for management and end up being offered "grunt" work.

    The Crowing One on
    3rddocbottom.jpg
  • Post BluePost Blue Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    I was going advise you to threaten them with the info that you've been offered a better job at the end of the hallway, but the above advice is sound.

    Post Blue on
    Moments before the wind.
  • SammyFSammyF Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    Send one resume and make it clear that you're interested in the lesser position if not hired for the senior.

    Happens all the time with my applicants who come in looking for management and end up being offered "grunt" work.

    Two questions:

    A. Do you know where I can find a good example of a cover letter that does this well?

    B. Has anyone that used this strategy ever come away with the management job?

    I'm about 70% sure I could actually get the higher-level position--I'm a couple years shy on experience against the benchmark, but I have more leadership experience within the years I do have than most other folks in my field. My last team had about 250 attached personnel. I'm really anxious to make sure I'm not accidentally underselling myself or signalling that I'm not confident I could do this job.

    I'm about 90% sure though that I could get the other job, the remaining ten percent being the possibility that I might accidentally get hit by a city bus on my way to the interview.

    SammyF on
  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    edited April 2009
    SammyF wrote: »
    Send one resume and make it clear that you're interested in the lesser position if not hired for the senior.

    Happens all the time with my applicants who come in looking for management and end up being offered "grunt" work.

    Two questions:

    A. Do you know where I can find a good example of a cover letter that does this well?

    B. Has anyone that used this strategy ever come away with the management job?

    I'm about 70% sure I could actually get the higher-level position--I'm a couple years shy on experience against the benchmark, but I have more leadership experience within the years I do have than most other folks in my field. My last team had about 250 attached personnel. I'm really anxious to make sure I'm not accidentally underselling myself or signalling that I'm not confident I could do this job.

    I'm about 90% sure though that I could get the other job, the remaining ten percent being the possibility that I might accidentally get hit by a city bus on my way to the interview.

    1. You're not actually applying for both jobs. You're applying for the "Senior" job. One sentence is all that is required: "I would like to show my interest in the "Project Manager" position if I am not selected..." etc.

    2. Yes. It isn't a strategy. It's saying, I want that job, but this similar but lesser job I am also qualified to fill if you like me but not enough to give me the big bucks.

    The Crowing One on
    3rddocbottom.jpg
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