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Finding Massive Gas - The International Year of Astronomy

NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
edited April 2009 in Singularity Engine++
This year, 2009, is the International Year of Astronomy. Astronomy is the study of celestial objects, and has nothing to do with if your ex-girlfriend was a bitch because she was born in September.

What does it mean to be in living in the International Year of Astronomy?

Well, here is the website, which is just a basic overview of stuff (with a page for donations).

Here are some other features:
Some blogs I like about Astronomy:
- The Bad Astronomer Phil Plait (gets into politics and skepticism and Dr. Who from time to time)
- Universe Today


If you want to learn more about how the Universe works, I suggest Relativity by Albert Einstein, which explains the maths of why if Druhim and I are in spaceships flying away from each other at extremely high speeds and the total rate of separation between the two ships is greater than the speed of light, inside either of those ships it will never look like we are moving away from each other faster than the speed of light. Then read Relativity Simply Explained because math destroys your brains and this book lays out with examples and metaphor.

You can move on to A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking which explains what happened to Sam Neill in Event Horizon and how wacky wheelchair guys can get tons of pussy if they are the smartest people on the planet.

Once you have read that, you will hate me and Science and you'll think the Moon Landings were fake, so I probably don't have to list anything else.



ASTRONOMY EVENTS FOR 2009:
Jan 3-4th - Quadrantids Meteor Shower - in the Western part of North America, you should be able to see this fun meteor shower, assuming you don't mind standing out in the cold in the middle of the night.
March 8th - Saturn will be the closest to us, so a great time for viewing her and her moons.
April 21-22 - Lyrids meteor shower
July 22nd - Total Solar Eclipse - if you live in China or Mongolia or something, I'm looking at you here Viv, your day will get very dark as the moon makes the crazies thing God is punishing them by moving in front of the Sun. One of the greatest astronomical events people can witness.
August 12-13 Perseids meteor shower - there will be a bright moon blocking this out for the most part in the early evening, but if you venture out in the early morning hours, it should look great.
August 14th - Jupiter at opposition, really close. I took a look through a 4-inch telescope at it last year when it was at opposition and you could make out the great red eye and the banding of the cloud layers. It was amazing to see and this will be your best time to see it.
October 13th - Conjunction of Venus and Saturn - these two planets are going to be right the fuck on top of each other in our night sky.
November 17-18 Leonids meteor shower, this is a good one to watch
December 31st - as if crazy people don't need more to worry about, there will be a partial lunar eclipse on New Year's Eve next year, visible through most of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia.



So here is the place to talk about astronomy, or, expectedly, just start quoting Aliens.


Spoiler:

NotASenator on
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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Hey man, it's a dry heat.

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  • FandyienFandyien But Otto, what about us? Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    alien_movie.jpg

    (I think astronomy is very interesting)

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  • BedlamBedlam Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Oh dang I went and bought a space themed calander this year :D

    I think I should go back to my galaxy av because space is awesome. And purple stuff is awesome.

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    t NaS I want to buy a nice sized motorized reflector scope and attach a high-quality cam to it so I can stream the video feed, maybe set up a site where I can charge people a few bucks to move it around and look at what they want.

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  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Oh by the way, if you want a real simple way to start learning about astronomy, go to Borders and look in the budget book sections, they always have these huge fuck off coffee table books that are filled with pictures of the planets and other galaxies and shit. But most importantly is they always have these little blocks of text next to the images and those blocks of text contain knowledge!

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  • MysstMysst King Monkey of Hedonism IslandRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    I want to punch a planet so hard it cracks.

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  • FandyienFandyien But Otto, what about us? Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Hey NaS have you tried any of those galaxy simulation programs, or whatever? There's one that lets you fly all around the milky way and establishes distance, tells you about the planets and their names, and lets you move around a 3-d manifestation of everything and it's very neat.

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  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Weaver wrote: »
    t NaS I want to buy a nice sized motorized reflector scope and attach a high-quality cam to it so I can stream the video feed, maybe set up a site where I can charge people a few bucks to move it around and look at what they want.

    The issue here is if you buy a telescope on a motorized mount, it's probably already controlled by an interface or something. It might be better to buy a good scope and build your own motorized mount so you can control it with custom software.

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    The Pauli Exclusion Principle is why neutron stars don't collapse further in upon themselves.

    themoreyouknow.jpg

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  • MysstMysst King Monkey of Hedonism IslandRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    also I want a big screen that shows what the hubble is looking at in realtime.

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  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Fandyien wrote: »
    Hey NaS have you tried any of those galaxy simulation programs, or whatever? There's one that lets you fly all around the milky way and establishes distance, tells you about the planets and their names, and lets you move around a 3-d manifestation of everything and it's very neat.

    I have a few star finder programs at home, like Starry Night, but nothing like that.

    I mean, besides Orbiter

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    NotACrook wrote: »
    Weaver wrote: »
    t NaS I want to buy a nice sized motorized reflector scope and attach a high-quality cam to it so I can stream the video feed, maybe set up a site where I can charge people a few bucks to move it around and look at what they want.

    The issue here is if you buy a telescope on a motorized mount, it's probably already controlled by an interface or something. It might be better to buy a good scope and build your own motorized mount so you can control it with custom software.

    I just think it'd bee neat for some kid in I don't know Greece to be all "Hey mom, look at this I'm looking at Tranquility Base through this telescope in America this so cool oh hey wait the moon's gone oh it's raining there again great."

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Mysst wrote: »
    also I want a big screen that shows what the hubble is looking at in realtime.


    I've been wishing for this for years

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    It'd be pretty dull though since a lot of what Hubble picks up isn't visible spectrum and the pics that get released are all false color interpretation & such.

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  • MarathonMarathon Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Astronomy is out of this world!

    Dumb Hero wrote: »
    "Okay, you take 2d4 damage from the ogre's dick impaling your 2inch anus"
    Satan! Look here!
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  • ChicoBlueChicoBlue Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    I am a Libra.

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  • BedlamBedlam Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Yay! Space is special! Children are special!

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  • UsagiUsagi it’s like someone threw a bowl of loose fruit into a front-loading clothes dryer Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    and tonight Dr. Nemiroff (one of the editors of APOD) is speaking at the American Museum of Natural History in NYC: http://www.aaa.org/index1.aspx?BD=9460

    Odin wrote: »
    I've learned what is best in life:

    To crush the patriarchy, see it driven before you, and hear the lamentations of its fuckboys.
    HEY SATAN | WISH POST
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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    In Oct. last year (2008) NASA launched a satellite that is going to map out the heliopause/sheath/termination shock of the solar system.

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
  • DrIanMalcolmDrIanMalcolm Does somebody go out into the park and pull up the dinosaurs' skirts?Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    After eight years of kicking Science in the balls, this is what President-elect Obama said when he named his Science advisors:
    Whether it’s the science to slow global warming; the technology to protect our troops and confront bioterror and weapons of mass destruction; the research to find life-saving cures; or the innovations to remake our industries and create twenty-first century jobs—today, more than ever before, science holds the key to our survival as a planet and our security and prosperity as a nation.

    Because the truth is that promoting science isn’t just about providing resources—it’s about protecting free and open inquiry. It’s about ensuring that facts and evidence are never twisted or obscured by politics or ideology. It’s about listening to what our scientists have to say, even when it’s inconvenient—especially when it’s inconvenient. Because the highest purpose of science is the search for knowledge, truth and a greater understanding of the world around us. That will be my goal as President of the United States—and I could not have a better team to guide me in this work.

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    fuck yeah

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  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Also, in a really odd turn of events, the wife of NASA administrator Mike Griffin has sent around an email pleading for people to sign an online petition to convince Obama to let Griffin keep his job.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/12/31/dont-fire-my-husband-nasa_n_154575.html

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
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  • SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    HST gets all the attention!

    Where's the love for Spitzer, Chandra, and Compton?

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  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Squall wrote: »
    HST gets all the attention!

    Where's the love for Spitzer, Chandra, and Compton?

    Squall goes on my list.

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  • MysstMysst King Monkey of Hedonism IslandRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Weaver wrote: »
    It'd be pretty dull though since a lot of what Hubble picks up isn't visible spectrum and the pics that get released are all false color interpretation & such.
    yeah, this is the part that would suck.

    maybe just a bunch of screens showing showing all the post-processed work

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  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Mysst wrote: »
    Weaver wrote: »
    It'd be pretty dull though since a lot of what Hubble picks up isn't visible spectrum and the pics that get released are all false color interpretation & such.
    yeah, this is the part that would suck.

    maybe just a bunch of screens showing showing all the post-processed work

    http://hubblesite.org/gallery/

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  • SquallSquall hap cloud Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Astro-photography is amazingly fun. I did some a few years ago with the New Mexico Skies Computer Operated Telescopes (CATs) on Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) with particularly nice nebulae. The results were spectacular despite my novice ability.

    You too can make brilliant astro photographs with LRGB fits data and the right photoshop plugin!

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    750px-Sig06-029_medium.jpg

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    That black area right around the star? Relative calm. Here be planets etc. That bright orange? BATTEN DOWN YE HATCHES!

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    or more just make sure everything is adequately EM and radiation shielded

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  • BedlamBedlam Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    NotACrook wrote: »
    Mysst wrote: »
    Weaver wrote: »
    It'd be pretty dull though since a lot of what Hubble picks up isn't visible spectrum and the pics that get released are all false color interpretation & such.
    yeah, this is the part that would suck.

    maybe just a bunch of screens showing showing all the post-processed work

    http://hubblesite.org/gallery/
    That link just loads a blank page for me.

    http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/

    That one works better.

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  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    I'm getting this sometime this year and I'll be picking up the t-mount to hook Leanna's D40 to it.

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    NotACrook wrote: »
    I'm getting this sometime this year and I'll be picking up the t-mount to hook Leanna's D40 to it.


    coming over to your house pronto

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  • NotASenatorNotASenator Registered User regular
    edited January 2009
    Oh, there's a program called NexRemote for that which lets you control the motorized mount wirelessly through a PC.

    But the best part is that you can use a gamepad to move your telescope around.

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  • #pipe#pipe Cocky Stride, Musky odours Pope of Chili TownRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    I guess most people have seen it, but it's still awesome

    relative size of our sun to some of its bigger brothers

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  • WeaverWeaver From here, I can see seven seasRegistered User regular
    edited January 2009
    My hopes of eventual interstellar travel are steadfast but laced with obstacles. Such as the interstellar medium, the mixture of gases permeating the spaces between stars, being heated up to near 10,000 Kelvin. "Sir, we're approaching a pocket of heated hydrog-+++CARRIER LOST"

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