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OWS - Finger-Wiggling Their Way To a Better Tomorrow

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Posts

  • bowenbowen Registered User regular
    I know the number one thing I hear about with income disparity is that if all of us are rich none of us are.

  • CptKemzikCptKemzik Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Heh nice try, government jobs aren't real jobs!

    (unless you're shipped off to a third world country to blow things up)

    But yes gutting the public sector has been doing enough on its own to hurt the economy. Especially when it comes to education both at the primary/secondary level, and with higher ed. Screwing up your public schools, and not making public universities and state schools as affordable as possible for residents, is always going bump up your unemployed(/able) population.

    CptKemzik on
  • AManFromEarthAManFromEarth Let's get to twerk! The King in the SwampRegistered User regular
    CptKemzik wrote: »
    Heh nice try, government jobs aren't real jobs!

    (unless you're shipped off to a third world country to blow things up)

    Like, where do people except public sector workers who get laid off to go? This includes the military, more so since very few enlisted jobs actually teach marketable skills.

    Lh96QHG.png
  • spacekungfumanspacekungfuman Poor and minority-filled Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    CptKemzik wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    But how can he side with people he doesn't know or understand?

    Let's call it an investment in a securities bond, perhaps. :P

    BTW, has SKFM ever said what kind of lawyer he is? I'm just curious, because while I don't understand how a lawyer can come across as so ... argh, I am trying to think of something nice to say, he does at times seem to be willing to admit the value of a good debate and change his opinion, its just so many of his opinions highlight gross inequalities.

    It just reminds me my young cousin who is a US citizen who is ridiculously intelligent, like genius level, who comes from a relatively poor rural family/community wants to grow up to be an investment banker / manager this last family get together at Christmas. I mean, I swear this kid could come up with a way to find a cure for cancer or build a moon base and he wants to be the ultra-rich - I didn't have the heart to tell him how much the deck was stacked against him even if he did manage to become new money and it dismayed me because it feels like our future generations ambitions are torn between being good people and living as the working poor sub class of society. :(

    This is a little off topic, but our society absolutely rewards the wrong things. I was valedictorian of my college, and work with brilliant people who come from useful backgrounds like hard science degrees (I actually have former ivy league professors at my firm), and we spend our time figuring out how to make rich people richer, how to minimize taxes or how to keep patents as long as possible. At least now that I practice employee benefits and executive compensation, I do "good" by helping protect pension plans from huge penalties if they are not operated correctly. When I was a tax attorney, I literally did nothing but help companies pay less in taxes.

    I don't want to lose the quoted point. Is one of OWS's messages that we need to flip the way we prioritize careers by paying more for fields that are actually useful to society? Because that seems like something that would do a lot of good for everyone.

    You're going to have to elaborate what "useful" is in your logic, because it sounds like it's going to go down another "only STEM degree students are doing something useful," tangent. Are you in favor of having teachers' pay increase across the board? What about adjunct faculty at universities who are increasingly becoming the norm in favor of traditional tenured professors, yet they get paid dick for each class they teach and don't receive any benefits. Meanwhile vice president of flying around on jets (on the school's dime) and schmoozing with moneyed people takes home over a hundred thousand plus.

    To elaborate on my point: this isn't to say that STEM funding isn't woefully inadequate for people who want to do something other than work for the pfizers or military contracts of the world. Part of the research I have been doing for my work this year however has included reading a metlife survey on the state of education and how teachers are utilized. The Fortune 1000 executives surveyed almost unanimously wanted schools teaching more critical thinking/transferable skills to students over making sure students are crammed with as much advanced math and science as possible (unless students are specifically interested in that). I.e. skills that are applicable to careers beyond what may fall under the STEM spectrum.

    Definitely not just STEM. We should be paying teachers, police, nurses, etc. way more money. But we also do need to pay STEM more, and really any other careers that will do more for people than the high paid careers now (lawyers, finance). I think society would just be better off if fewer of our bright, talented people went into careers like mine or finance. Hell, even within the law we only pay people well for doing corporate work (transactional or litigation) instead of paying the prosecutors, public defenders, immigration, real estate etc. lawyers who actually benefit "regular" people.

    7zh9uu9etcor.jpg
    Chanus wrote:
    It's been a butt come true! I get to work with the absolute best boobs in the business. What more could a money ask for? Kids, aim for the freeloaders !
  • spacekungfumanspacekungfuman Poor and minority-filled Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    CptKemzik wrote: »
    Heh nice try, government jobs aren't real jobs!

    (unless you're shipped off to a third world country to blow things up)

    Like, where do people except public sector workers who get laid off to go? This includes the military, more so since very few enlisted jobs actually teach marketable skills.

    I'm not saying it makes it ok, but at least older government works who are forced out may be able to collect their pensions and benefits as part of the deal (I.e., they give you extra years if vesting service).

    7zh9uu9etcor.jpg
    Chanus wrote:
    It's been a butt come true! I get to work with the absolute best boobs in the business. What more could a money ask for? Kids, aim for the freeloaders !
  • AManFromEarthAManFromEarth Let's get to twerk! The King in the SwampRegistered User regular
    CptKemzik wrote: »
    Heh nice try, government jobs aren't real jobs!

    (unless you're shipped off to a third world country to blow things up)

    Like, where do people except public sector workers who get laid off to go? This includes the military, more so since very few enlisted jobs actually teach marketable skills.

    I'm not saying it makes it ok, but at least older government works who are forced out may be able to collect their pensions and benefits as part of the deal (I.e., they give you extra years if vesting service).

    Except it's not older workers, it's younger workers. Take Florida for example. Scott slashed the education budget so scores and scores of teachers were laid off, I think at least a thousand or so, but I think more, and there's a class size amendment that has to be met. It wasn't the older teachers or the "bad teachers" who got the ax, it was the young kids right out of college.

    I think you might be overestimating how much thought people who back austerity in our government put into this kind of thing, and I know you're overestimating their generosity.

    Lh96QHG.png
  • spacekungfumanspacekungfuman Poor and minority-filled Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2012
    CptKemzik wrote: »
    Heh nice try, government jobs aren't real jobs!

    (unless you're shipped off to a third world country to blow things up)

    Like, where do people except public sector workers who get laid off to go? This includes the military, more so since very few enlisted jobs actually teach marketable skills.

    I'm not saying it makes it ok, but at least older government works who are forced out may be able to collect their pensions and benefits as part of the deal (I.e., they give you extra years if vesting service).

    Except it's not older workers, it's younger workers. Take Florida for example. Scott slashed the education budget so scores and scores of teachers were laid off, I think at least a thousand or so, but I think more, and there's a class size amendment that has to be met. It wasn't the older teachers or the "bad teachers" who got the ax, it was the young kids right out of college.

    I think you might be overestimating how much thought people who back austerity in our government put into this kind of thing, and I know you're overestimating their generosity.

    Interesting. In NY and NJ, we generally try to get older (more exspensive) teachers to retire first, by cutting a deal with them to accelerate their pension, or by giving them a better deal when they sell their accumulated vacation days back to the school. If that fails, then we excess (layoff) younger teachers, but it rarely comes to that.

    FWIW, I know one of the people in charge of risk management issues for Florida, and apparantly there are HUGE amounts of money being bled from the schools by people on what may be fraudulent disability claims. We are talking enough money (between disability and providing them with medical benefits while they are out) to have saved hundreds of teaching jobs.

    spacekungfuman on
    7zh9uu9etcor.jpg
    Chanus wrote:
    It's been a butt come true! I get to work with the absolute best boobs in the business. What more could a money ask for? Kids, aim for the freeloaders !
  • AManFromEarthAManFromEarth Let's get to twerk! The King in the SwampRegistered User regular
    And that's a thing we should pursue to find the truth in it either way.

    Too bad our legislature and governor take the cut first, ask questions later side.

    We've had a Tea Party government since like 1845.

    Lh96QHG.png
  • tyrannustyrannus Registered User regular
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/opinion/why-i-am-leaving-goldman-sachs.html?_r=1
    TODAY is my last day at Goldman Sachs. After almost 12 years at the firm — first as a summer intern while at Stanford, then in New York for 10 years, and now in London — I believe I have worked here long enough to understand the trajectory of its culture, its people and its identity. And I can honestly say that the environment now is as toxic and destructive as I have ever seen it.

  • HacksawHacksaw J Duggan Wrestler at LawRegistered User regular
    tyrannus wrote: »
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/opinion/why-i-am-leaving-goldman-sachs.html?_r=1
    TODAY is my last day at Goldman Sachs. After almost 12 years at the firm — first as a summer intern while at Stanford, then in New York for 10 years, and now in London — I believe I have worked here long enough to understand the trajectory of its culture, its people and its identity. And I can honestly say that the environment now is as toxic and destructive as I have ever seen it.

    smbc_nihilist.gif

  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    So. Think that article has enough influence to cause some of their clients to cease further transactions with them, causing them to go into a bankruptcy spiral, and taking down the entire financial system with it?

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • adytumadytum Registered User regular
    More than likely it will attract further clients that worry more about money than morals.

    etxvv5.jpg
  • override367override367 misogynist/MRA/socially irresponsible Registered User regular
    Public universities are now the metric for poor people?

    Fuck's sake

    XBLIVE: Biggestoverride
    League of Legends: override367
  • tyrannustyrannus Registered User regular
    Houn wrote: »
    So. Think that article has enough influence to cause some of their clients to cease further transactions with them, causing them to go into a bankruptcy spiral, and taking down the entire financial system with it?
    Well, taking down the entire financial system would be a really bad thing and only a stupid person would want that, so let's hope it doesn't.

  • DeebaserDeebaser Lead Frog Rammer Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    Goldman will sadly outlive Penny Arcade and everyone who has ever/will ever post here.

    http://i.imgur.com/SVLUjAW.png
    Vanguard wrote: »
    ...poetry is actually the worst
  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    adytum wrote: »
    More than likely it will attract further clients that worry more about money than morals.

    I dunno. The bits in there about systemic encouragement of convincing clients to make investment decisions based on what's best for GS instead of the client, and about convincing clients to buy toxic assets that GS wants to dump? Yeah, that kills any and all trust the rich may have with the organization.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • GooeyGooey Registered User regular
    Houn wrote: »
    So. Think that article has enough influence to cause some of their clients to cease further transactions with them, causing them to go into a bankruptcy spiral, and taking down the entire financial system with it?

    No.

    919UOwT.png
  • tyrannustyrannus Registered User regular
    Well, yeah, the salesmen are sleazy as hell and the leadership in the firm attracts a certain type of morally nebulous jerk. That behavior and leadership I guess really influences how everyone in the company runs.
    I hope this can be a wake-up call to the board of directors. Make the client the focal point of your business again. Without clients you will not make money. In fact, you will not exist. Weed out the morally bankrupt people, no matter how much money they make for the firm. And get the culture right again, so people want to work here for the right reasons. People who care only about making money will not sustain this firm — or the trust of its clients — for very much longer.

    I like this bit. I like it a lot.

    I don't like the idea of cutting off my leg to spite my foot, though.

  • VanguardVanguard the champion of i-don't-give-a-fuck what tremendously unlikableRegistered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    Gooey wrote: »
    Houn wrote: »
    So. Think that article has enough influence to cause some of their clients to cease further transactions with them, causing them to go into a bankruptcy spiral, and taking down the entire financial system with it?

    No.

    This. It's his word against a financial giant. Will it get coverage? Sure. Followed by 24 hours of attacks by industry analysts, pundits, and talk show hosts.

  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    Vanguard wrote: »
    Gooey wrote: »
    Houn wrote: »
    So. Think that article has enough influence to cause some of their clients to cease further transactions with them, causing them to go into a bankruptcy spiral, and taking down the entire financial system with it?
    No.
    This. It's his word against a financial giant. Will it get coverage? Sure. Followed by 24 hours of attacks by industry analysts, pundits, and talk show hosts.
    He's probably a socialist/communist/Mexican Jew-Lizard who hates success, and is trying to ruin America.

  • VanguardVanguard the champion of i-don't-give-a-fuck what tremendously unlikableRegistered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    Thanatos wrote: »
    Vanguard wrote: »
    Gooey wrote: »
    Houn wrote: »
    So. Think that article has enough influence to cause some of their clients to cease further transactions with them, causing them to go into a bankruptcy spiral, and taking down the entire financial system with it?
    No.
    This. It's his word against a financial giant. Will it get coverage? Sure. Followed by 24 hours of attacks by industry analysts, pundits, and talk show hosts.
    He's probably a socialist/communist/Mexican Jew-Lizard who hates success, and is trying to ruin America.

    You forgot to mention his time in the Reich, which is where he learned his particularly cruel form of OWS-inspired Fascism.

  • CanadianWolverineCanadianWolverine Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    tyrannus wrote: »
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/opinion/why-i-am-leaving-goldman-sachs.html?_r=1
    TODAY is my last day at Goldman Sachs. After almost 12 years at the firm — first as a summer intern while at Stanford, then in New York for 10 years, and now in London — I believe I have worked here long enough to understand the trajectory of its culture, its people and its identity. And I can honestly say that the environment now is as toxic and destructive as I have ever seen it.

    Here is the most recent fallout:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/15/business/a-public-exit-from-goldman-sachs-hits-a-wounded-wall-street.html?ref=opinion

    Second page goes into some general fallout of Wallstreet's culture of cut throat short term greed:
    Wall Street could now pay a steep price for short-term thinking, experts said, even if salaries and behavior have not caught up with public disillusionment. Hemmed in by new regulations, the big banks are being forced to give up proprietary trading. Fewer graduates of elite Ivy League schools are flocking to careers in finance. And the anger is spreading, seen not only in the Occupy Wall Street protests but also in the increasing distrust among the most affluent consumers.

    Over all, the percentage of people who have little or no faith in the fairness of investment companies rose to 41 percent in 2011 from 26 percent in 2008, according to Yankelovich Monitor 2011. Only credit card companies, corporate chief executives, the federal government and lawyers fared worse. Even banks and insurance companies did better.

    Nor is the outrage a matter of populist revolt. The feelings were identical in households whether they earned $100,000 or $50,000.

    While Mr. Smith’s career at Goldman is over, he insisted it was not too late for his former firm and the rest of Wall Street.

    Something I disagree with though, I think greed in general is a problem, even long term greed is harmful to society and should be firmly kept in check.

    CanadianWolverine on
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  • RedTideRedTide Registered User regular
    Interesting. In NY and NJ, we generally try to get older (more exspensive) teachers to retire first, by cutting a deal with them to accelerate their pension, or by giving them a better deal when they sell their accumulated vacation days back to the school. If that fails, then we excess (layoff) younger teachers, but it rarely comes to that.

    This is how it used to be in New Jersey. The current governor basically put a gun to the head of the retirement eligible and scared them out the door. For municipalities/agencies that were looking to avoid layoffs (Newark Police and Fire, Camden Police and Fire, every major city police and fire) both because it sends a terrible message and is heinously unpopular with voters, state aid was cut and many municipalities had to make severe cutbacks even with a flood of retirees.

    Camden layoffs.
    Immediately after 1/3 of fire being laid off.
    A month later.
    And some of the aftermath of losing half the police force.

  • spacekungfumanspacekungfuman Poor and minority-filled Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited March 2012
    Vanguard wrote: »
    Gooey wrote: »
    Houn wrote: »
    So. Think that article has enough influence to cause some of their clients to cease further transactions with them, causing them to go into a bankruptcy spiral, and taking down the entire financial system with it?

    No.

    This. It's his word against a financial giant. Will it get coverage? Sure. Followed by 24 hours of attacks by industry analysts, pundits, and talk show hosts.

    This will be handled the same way any major PR gaff is handled. Lots of face to face meetings with clients, lots of assurances what was said is false. Lots of free dinners to cement relationships. Nothing will change inside, except maybe the policies on internal communication, and nondisparagement.

    spacekungfuman on
    7zh9uu9etcor.jpg
    Chanus wrote:
    It's been a butt come true! I get to work with the absolute best boobs in the business. What more could a money ask for? Kids, aim for the freeloaders !
  • lonelyahavalonelyahava One day, I will be able to say to myself "I am beautiful and I am perfect just the way I am"Registered User regular
    RedTide wrote: »
    Interesting. In NY and NJ, we generally try to get older (more exspensive) teachers to retire first, by cutting a deal with them to accelerate their pension, or by giving them a better deal when they sell their accumulated vacation days back to the school. If that fails, then we excess (layoff) younger teachers, but it rarely comes to that.

    This is how it used to be in New Jersey. The current governor basically put a gun to the head of the retirement eligible and scared them out the door. For municipalities/agencies that were looking to avoid layoffs (Newark Police and Fire, Camden Police and Fire, every major city police and fire) both because it sends a terrible message and is heinously unpopular with voters, state aid was cut and many municipalities had to make severe cutbacks even with a flood of retirees.

    Camden layoffs.
    Immediately after 1/3 of fire being laid off.
    A month later.
    And some of the aftermath of losing half the police force.

    Jesus.

    After going to University for 5 years in Camden, I can say that laying off a majority of that police force is probably not in the best interests of anybody at all.

    They were some nice folks, honestly!

  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    And Bloomberg continues to show why he is a shitty mayor by personally going to and supporting Goldman Sachs:

    http://www.salon.com/2012/03/16/mayor_bloomberg_personally_cheers_up_goldman_sachs/

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum
    Spoiler:
  • spacekungfumanspacekungfuman Poor and minority-filled Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    And Bloomberg continues to show why he is a shitty mayor by personally going to and supporting Goldman Sachs:

    http://www.salon.com/2012/03/16/mayor_bloomberg_personally_cheers_up_goldman_sachs/

    Yes, it is terrible for the mayor to show support and solidarity to a major employer and a major player in the city's economy.

    7zh9uu9etcor.jpg
    Chanus wrote:
    It's been a butt come true! I get to work with the absolute best boobs in the business. What more could a money ask for? Kids, aim for the freeloaders !
  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    And Bloomberg continues to show why he is a shitty mayor by personally going to and supporting Goldman Sachs:

    http://www.salon.com/2012/03/16/mayor_bloomberg_personally_cheers_up_goldman_sachs/

    Yes, it is terrible for the mayor to show support and solidarity to a major employer and a major player in the city's economy.

    I hear Al'Qaeda employs a lot of people, too. Maybe he should cheer them up, too, so long as he's visiting terrorists and criminals.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • UnknownSaintUnknownSaint Registered User
    Houn wrote: »
    And Bloomberg continues to show why he is a shitty mayor by personally going to and supporting Goldman Sachs:

    http://www.salon.com/2012/03/16/mayor_bloomberg_personally_cheers_up_goldman_sachs/

    Yes, it is terrible for the mayor to show support and solidarity to a major employer and a major player in the city's economy.

    I hear Al'Qaeda employs a lot of people, too. Maybe he should cheer them up, too, so long as he's visiting terrorists and criminals.

    I have very much the opposite of love for Goldman Sachs, but maybe this isn't the best analogy.

  • Pi-r8Pi-r8 Registered User regular
    Actually goldman sachs employs very few people. That's part of why their salaries are so ridiculously high.

  • HounHoun Registered User regular
    Houn wrote: »
    And Bloomberg continues to show why he is a shitty mayor by personally going to and supporting Goldman Sachs:

    http://www.salon.com/2012/03/16/mayor_bloomberg_personally_cheers_up_goldman_sachs/

    Yes, it is terrible for the mayor to show support and solidarity to a major employer and a major player in the city's economy.

    I hear Al'Qaeda employs a lot of people, too. Maybe he should cheer them up, too, so long as he's visiting terrorists and criminals.

    I have very much the opposite of love for Goldman Sachs, but maybe this isn't the best analogy.

    I'm inventing a new version of the Godwin, here. It's gonna take some time, man.

    Steam: DigitalArcanist | PSN: DigitalArcanist | NNID: DigitalArcanist | Backloggery: Houn
  • DeebaserDeebaser Lead Frog Rammer Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    edited March 2012
    And Bloomberg continues to show why he is a shitty mayor by personally going to and supporting Goldman Sachs:

    http://www.salon.com/2012/03/16/mayor_bloomberg_personally_cheers_up_goldman_sachs/

    Dude, Bloomberg's actually a pretty damn good mayor. He's done quite a bit for NYC over the past decade. Visiting wealthy constituents to give them handjobs under the table is just something that politicians do.

    Deebaser on
    http://i.imgur.com/SVLUjAW.png
    Vanguard wrote: »
    ...poetry is actually the worst
  • spacekungfumanspacekungfuman Poor and minority-filled Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Actually goldman sachs employs very few people. That's part of why their salaries are so ridiculously high.

    ? GS has over 35,000 employees world wide. They are a huge employer.

    And Bloomberg has been an incredible mayor. I would elect him for another term or 8 if I could. 311 and the abolition of the school board alone are enough to make him one of the greatest mayors of all time.

    7zh9uu9etcor.jpg
    Chanus wrote:
    It's been a butt come true! I get to work with the absolute best boobs in the business. What more could a money ask for? Kids, aim for the freeloaders !
  • RedTideRedTide Registered User regular
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Actually goldman sachs employs very few people. That's part of why their salaries are so ridiculously high.

    ? GS has over 35,000 employees world wide. They are a huge employer.

    And Bloomberg has been an incredible mayor. I would elect him for another term or 8 if I could. 311 and the abolition of the school board alone are enough to make him one of the greatest mayors of all time.

    Personally I wish that him and Commissioner Kelly were both nailed to a cross for their recent escapades in turning the NYPD into a secret police force, but thats just me.

  • hippofanthippofant Helping Mario save Peach. Registered User regular
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Actually goldman sachs employs very few people. That's part of why their salaries are so ridiculously high.

    ? GS has over 35,000 employees world wide. They are a huge employer.

    And Bloomberg has been an incredible mayor. I would elect him for another term or 8 if I could. 311 and the abolition of the school board alone are enough to make him one of the greatest mayors of all time.

    Uh wut? Not really. Walmart employs 2.1M. Apple 60K. Boeing 164K. Google 32K. IBM 426K. Deloitte 182K. HSBC 288K. AMR Corp 73K. NYPD has 36K police officers. NYC Department of Education has 75K teachers. Huge is not at all the word I would use.

    (Also, Wikipedia says 33K, not 35.)

  • Kipling217Kipling217 Registered User regular
    hippofant wrote: »
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Actually goldman sachs employs very few people. That's part of why their salaries are so ridiculously high.

    ? GS has over 35,000 employees world wide. They are a huge employer.

    And Bloomberg has been an incredible mayor. I would elect him for another term or 8 if I could. 311 and the abolition of the school board alone are enough to make him one of the greatest mayors of all time.

    Uh wut? Not really. Walmart employs 2.1M. Apple 60K. Boeing 164K. Google 32K. IBM 426K. Deloitte 182K. HSBC 288K. AMR Corp 73K. NYPD has 36K police officers. NYC Department of Education has 75K teachers. Huge is not at all the word I would use.

    (Also, Wikipedia says 33K, not 35.)

    I think the 35k figure(or 33k) is worldwide, players like GS got offices in every major financial center in the world. Tokyo, London, Frankfurt and Rome. If there is money to be made of the markets there, GS will be there.

    For all the money GS brings into NY however, its shenanigans takes a lot out. Those subprime mortgages hit a lot of NYC suburbs hard. Its kinda of stupid of the mayor being tone deaf to the complaints of a significant number of New Yorkers about GS reputation for douchbaggery.

    GS is the posterchild for OWS hate for a reason.

    Communicating from the last of the Babylon Stations.
  • AManFromEarthAManFromEarth Let's get to twerk! The King in the SwampRegistered User regular
    Just because a company is widespread doesn't make it something that should be defended and it certainly doesn't mean that GS isn't in dire need of reform.

    Lh96QHG.png
  • DeebaserDeebaser Lead Frog Rammer Fake Board GamerRegistered User regular
    hippofant wrote: »
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Actually goldman sachs employs very few people. That's part of why their salaries are so ridiculously high.

    ? GS has over 35,000 employees world wide. They are a huge employer.

    And Bloomberg has been an incredible mayor. I would elect him for another term or 8 if I could. 311 and the abolition of the school board alone are enough to make him one of the greatest mayors of all time.

    Uh wut? Not really. Walmart employs 2.1M. Apple 60K. Boeing 164K. Google 32K. IBM 426K. Deloitte 182K. HSBC 288K. AMR Corp 73K. NYPD has 36K police officers. NYC Department of Education has 75K teachers. Huge is not at all the word I would use.

    (Also, Wikipedia says 33K, not 35.)

    Yeah,
    Number of WalMart employees in NYC: 0
    Goldman Sachs: about 2000 (guestimating)

    Tax revenue brought into NYC by WalMart: $0
    Tax revenue brought into NYC by Goldman Sachs: $TEXAS

    National numbers don't mean diddles. Goldman is a big employer of high net worth constituents. I am neither shocked, nor outraged that a New York City politician with a Wall Street background stopped by a major Wall Street firm to say "Sup"

    http://i.imgur.com/SVLUjAW.png
    Vanguard wrote: »
    ...poetry is actually the worst
  • AManFromEarthAManFromEarth Let's get to twerk! The King in the SwampRegistered User regular
    Deebaser wrote: »
    hippofant wrote: »
    Pi-r8 wrote: »
    Actually goldman sachs employs very few people. That's part of why their salaries are so ridiculously high.

    ? GS has over 35,000 employees world wide. They are a huge employer.

    And Bloomberg has been an incredible mayor. I would elect him for another term or 8 if I could. 311 and the abolition of the school board alone are enough to make him one of the greatest mayors of all time.

    Uh wut? Not really. Walmart employs 2.1M. Apple 60K. Boeing 164K. Google 32K. IBM 426K. Deloitte 182K. HSBC 288K. AMR Corp 73K. NYPD has 36K police officers. NYC Department of Education has 75K teachers. Huge is not at all the word I would use.

    (Also, Wikipedia says 33K, not 35.)

    Yeah,
    Number of WalMart employees in NYC: 0
    Goldman Sachs: about 2000 (guestimating)

    Tax revenue brought into NYC by WalMart: $0
    Tax revenue brought into NYC by Goldman Sachs: $TEXAS

    National numbers don't mean diddles. Goldman is a big employer of high net worth constituents. I am neither shocked, nor outraged that a New York City politician with a Wall Street background stopped by a major Wall Street firm to say "Sup"

    Well I am. Violently so. With gusto.

    Lh96QHG.png
  • Fallout2manFallout2man Registered User regular
    Deebaser wrote: »
    Yeah,
    Number of WalMart employees in NYC: 0
    Goldman Sachs: about 2000 (guestimating)

    Tax revenue brought into NYC by WalMart: $0
    Tax revenue brought into NYC by Goldman Sachs: $TEXAS

    National numbers don't mean diddles. Goldman is a big employer of high net worth constituents. I am neither shocked, nor outraged that a New York City politician with a Wall Street background stopped by a major Wall Street firm to say "Sup"

    So pretty much, it's entirely understandable from the viewpoint of a monster who only thinks in dollar signs flowing into his (or his family, or his political party's) coffers. But pretty abhorrent from people who care about the majority of human beings in New York or America. Not that we should expect better from Bloomberg, I certainly didn't, but it's still funny to see him at least own up to it: "Stop being mean to our big companies! They make a few people really rich and created the industry I made my fortune off of! Come on guys, quit it! We got rid of the hippies so let's just be happy and get back to drinking champagne while Rome burns!"

    On Ignorance:
    Kana wrote:
    If the best you can come up with against someone who's patently ignorant is to yell back at him, "Yeah? Well there's BOOKS, and they say you're WRONG!"

    Then honestly you're not coming out of this looking great either.
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