As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/
Options

I'm really concerned about what's going on at my job

c4tchc4tch Registered User regular
edited November 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
I have a boss. This guy is "nice." He's pretty cheerful, cracks jokes, and at face value seems like a good guy.

He's the most financially, and interpersonally corrupt person I have ever met.

Aside from the fact that his workers are paid, quote from him, a "pittance," have no benefits whatsoever, and have personally been regarded by him as "slaves," "minions," "lackeys," and "inferiors," he consistently annually pulls down over $1M a year, doing so mainly with state and US tax dollars, public money, doing so with regularity and illegality.

Oh the ways I have witnessed. Let me preface some of what I'm about to say with the statement - yes, I am blowing off some steam here. It has taken a lot for me to get to the point of ranting about my job on a penny arcade advice forum, but I am honestly at a loss for what to do, from both a moral and job-retention standpoint.

My boss is a forensic psychologist. He is often hired by the state through various public defender's offices to perform psychological, psychosexual, neuropsychological, etc., evaluations of individuals charged with criminal offense. His evaluations are performed to determine the above-stated individuals' competency to proceed to trial, and any potential mitigating circumstances at the time of the instant offense with regard to mental state.

Here is a typical example of what I witness personally:

Three different public defenders have requested evaluations to be done on a total of seven incarcerated individuals. Four of these individuals are located in a correction facility in a southern county, and the final three are located in a correction facility in an even farther county, south.

He is compensated for his travel expenses - gas, food, hotel, etc., and he charges roughly $300 per hour of travel, due to the fact that during the time he is driving he could very well be performing other lucrative tasks.

He sees all seven individuals, and treks back up to his office. How do you think the billing is handled? He bills each public defender separately as if he has made three separate trips to see these inmates. He queues up evaluations, and makes a single trip, effectively making $900 per hour for travel alone, not to mention that he is charging for staying in a total of 3 hotels, 3 times more gas, 3 times more food, etc. All of the extra money is pocketed on top of what he is being paid for the actual evaluation.

At this stage of the evaluation, my boss does the best he can to minimize any amount of time he spends actually evaluating these individuals. Public defenders and attorneys hire him and pay him to review materials and gather and scrutinize all relevant data to create an accurate psychological profile of the Defendants they represent. What does my boss do? He has hired personal assistants in whose original job description was not to review materials, but has these people, with unrelated college degrees, uncertified forensic examiners, review medical records, police reports, and EVEN INTERVIEW FRIENDS AND FAMILY so that he can free up his personal time to do whatever he pleases, or to set up more evaluations back to back to be done a breakneck speed to maximize his profits.

His incentive is not to help create accurate psychological profiles of these individuals, his incentive is simply to make money. I have before seen our office send a request directly to a medical facility for records of a client we are in the midst of evaluating, not specifying medical records related to mental health. they then mailed over boxes of pulmonary charts/readouts, displaying this client's heartbeat, blood pressure, etc., second by second. Rather than feeling remorseful over the paper wasted, as HEARTBEATS are completely unusable for measuring a client's psychological profile (other than some extreme example), my boss looks down at the boxes, and then asks one of his assistants to "flip through them" and charge for 3.5 hours worth of reviewing materials at $450 an hour.

He just made $1575 by stating a couple sentences that probably took, at MAXIMUM, twenty seconds.

I once locked my keys in my car and a locksmith came out to open my car door. I was charged sixty dollars, and I timed him - it took him about 8 seconds. when he finished I told him "I just paid you twelve dollars a second," to which he explained he had to drive out there, gas, etc., which I agreed with.

My boss however, did not. His assistants did all the requesting of records, all the reviewing, everything. He literally could have gone and played tennis, walked in and stated his sentences, and walked out.

at $1575 every twenty seconds, that's $78.75 a second, or $283,500 an hour. Granted, this rate of pay only lasted for twenty seconds in this instance, but when you sprinkle instances like this throughout an entire year.... twenty seconds here, ten seconds there... it adds up to a lot of squandered, wasted, taxpayer money.

I could go on about so many other, pardon me, completely FUCKED UP FRAUDULENT financial actions I've seen taken, but at this point I know I'm just ranting.

You should be angry, this is how the government allows your money to be spent.

I'm so pissed about all of this and I want to do something about it. I've heard of whistleblower statutes, but I wouldn't know the first thing on how to approach this. He exploits the poor, uneducated, disabled, minority, mentally unstable community, and REAPS profits.

This is all face value fraud. None of this notes that it is often in his best interest to see individuals kept in inpatient facilities for competency training so that he can re-evaluate them in six months and cash-in on their mental instability every time they're up for review.

Is there anything I can do? I'm sick of being so passive and I refuse to be a hand in such blatant exploitation.

League of Legends: firecane
c4tch on
«1

Posts

  • Options
    Bendery It Like BeckhamBendery It Like Beckham Hopeless Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    first off, I'd get rid of this, as it can probably be linked to you. Second, I'd wait for the IRS to audit him and make sure that all his records are in order

    Bendery It Like Beckham on
  • Options
    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Know any lawyers?

    Sit down and talk to one of them about whistleblower protection statutes in your state. Alternatively, call up the attorney general's office and talk to them about it. I'm guessing your boss primarily works for the state government, which would mean you'd be reliant on state whistleblower protection rather than federal whistleblower protection, which could be good or bad depending upon what state you're in.

    Thanatos on
  • Options
    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    first off, I'd get rid of this, as it can probably be linked to you. Second, I'd wait for the IRS to audit him and make sure that all his records are in order
    The IRS is fantastically fucking underfunded. Getting audited is basically winning the lottery.

    Thanatos on
  • Options
    RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    He's defrauding the state. The last thing you want to happen is for the state to find out from someone who's NOT YOU, because then you're going to get deposed and have to admit you knew this was going on. And that's not going to be a good day for you.

    RUNN1NGMAN on
  • Options
    adytumadytum The Inevitable Rise And FallRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Thanatos wrote: »
    first off, I'd get rid of this, as it can probably be linked to you. Second, I'd wait for the IRS to audit him and make sure that all his records are in order
    The IRS is fantastically fucking underfunded. Getting audited is basically winning the lottery.

    The IRS likes whistle blowers. They'll even pay you for it.

    The IRS will nail him to the wall for overstating his expenses.

    Also realize if this does get broken up your name will be forever linked to it. You should probably get ahead of the wave instead of getting caught up in it.

    adytum on
  • Options
    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Look at the end of the day the State is happy for the work he is doing and for the price he is charging out.

    If they are not happy with the quality of his work (or his cost) they would not go to him. It doesn't matter how much he charges per hour, your clients get lump sum billings, they don't care about the amount of time spent on it, they care about the cost and the quality and they seem to be accepting both.

    Really this entire thing smacks of sour grapes on your part because you aren't being paid all that much.

    Blake T on
  • Options
    Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Major East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Blaket wrote: »
    Look at the end of the day the State is happy for the work he is doing and for the price he is charging out.

    If they are not happy with the quality of his work (or his cost) they would not go to him. It doesn't matter how much he charges per hour, your clients get lump sum billings, they don't care about the amount of time spent on it, they care about the cost and the quality and they seem to be accepting both.

    Really this entire thing smacks of sour grapes on your part because you aren't being paid all that much.

    Seriously?

    Last time I checked, fraud is pretty serious.

    Iceman.USAF on
  • Options
    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    How is it fraud.

    He is charging a fee for the service. He may calculate charge rates on a per hour basis but his bill will be lump sum.

    He could charge four times as much and he wouldn't be getting work because his rates would be unreasonable.

    Despite the guy saying "he only worked 20 seconds" I would bet money that there is more time than that that his boss would work, he just didn't see it.

    To compare it to the silly car story, if the guy was right around the corner he wouldn't need to pay for all of that travel time either, but he would still charge for it, it's a call out fee.

    Blake T on
  • Options
    SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Blaket wrote: »
    How is it fraud.

    He is charging a fee for the service. He may calculate charge rates on a per hour basis but his bill will be lump sum.

    He could charge four times as much and he wouldn't be getting work because his rates would be unreasonable.

    Despite the guy saying "he only worked 20 seconds" I would bet money that there is more time than that that his boss would work, he just didn't see it.

    To compare it to the silly car story, if the guy was right around the corner he wouldn't need to pay for all of that travel time either, but he would still charge for it, it's a call out fee.

    Time spent Driving for 2 jobs: 4 hours total
    Time Billed for Driving for 2 jobs: 8 hours total

    You do not see how this is fraud?

    *edit*

    Not to mention that if you could save your customers money, a decent human being would most likely do that. That is a complete aside though.

    SkyGheNe on
  • Options
    GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Blaket wrote: »
    How is it fraud.

    You don't see how getting reimbursed from 3 different sources for 1 hotel stay and pocketing the difference is fraud? Really?

    Grundlestiltskin on
    3DS FC: 2079-6424-8577 | PSN: KaeruX65 | Steam: Karulytic | FFXIV: Wonder Boy
  • Options
    RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Blaket wrote: »
    Look at the end of the day the State is happy for the work he is doing and for the price he is charging out.

    If they are not happy with the quality of his work (or his cost) they would not go to him. It doesn't matter how much he charges per hour, your clients get lump sum billings, they don't care about the amount of time spent on it, they care about the cost and the quality and they seem to be accepting both.

    Really this entire thing smacks of sour grapes on your part because you aren't being paid all that much.

    You say this like the state is this monolithic entity that knows exactly how much it is paying this guy and exactly how much work he is doing.

    From what the OP is saying, multiple different people are hiring him for multiple different jobs, and he is combining them all into one trip and yet charging for travel multiple times. It wouldn't be obvious to anyone besides the government cog who's actually cutting the checks that this is happening, and that person is almost certainly not in a position to understand or care.

    RUNN1NGMAN on
  • Options
    LailLail Surrey, B.C.Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Sounds like he's good at time management/planning. Really, he's offering a service at a price that people are willing to pay.

    The auditor of the government cog who's cutting the cheques should be keeping track of who they're paying to do what. If they're not, good on OP's boss.

    Lail on
  • Options
    NotYouNotYou Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Blaket wrote: »
    How is it fraud.

    You don't see how getting reimbursed from 3 different sources for 1 hotel stay and pocketing the difference is fraud? Really?

    If your negotiated rate includes travel time/hotel, then there is nothing that says he has to give someone a discount because he's also doing work for other people on the same trip

    NotYou on
  • Options
    billwillbillwill Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    How stupid does this guy have to be? He gets others to do his work for him on top of the fraud?

    Amazing that his time is too valuable to even cover his own work when he's making that much money. So silly.

    billwill on
    I hate you and you hate me.
  • Options
    GrundlestiltskinGrundlestiltskin Behind you!Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    NotYou wrote: »
    Blaket wrote: »
    How is it fraud.

    You don't see how getting reimbursed from 3 different sources for 1 hotel stay and pocketing the difference is fraud? Really?

    If your negotiated rate includes travel time/hotel, then there is nothing that says he has to give someone a discount because he's also doing work for other people on the same trip

    It didn't sound like hotel/gas/food was part of the rate, it sounded like it was reimbursement for those things that were needed during the course of performing the job. If you're being reimbursed multiple times for the same thing because you're deliberately misrepresenting your expenses, it's fraud.

    Grundlestiltskin on
    3DS FC: 2079-6424-8577 | PSN: KaeruX65 | Steam: Karulytic | FFXIV: Wonder Boy
  • Options
    oldsakoldsak Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I'm far from an expert in this area.

    The double billing is most certainly fraudulent. The rest probably depends on what level of supervision he has to have over his employees.

    You should definitely do as Thanatos suggested and talk to an attorney. I don't know, but this behavior might fall under a false claims type statute, if your state has one. If your state does have one that covers this behavior, it would allow you to bring a lawsuit on behalf of the state and allow you to recover money.

    oldsak on
  • Options
    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2009

    It didn't sound like hotel/gas/food was part of the rate, it sounded like it was reimbursement for those things that were needed during the course of performing the job. If you're being reimbursed multiple times for the same thing because you're deliberately misrepresenting your expenses, it's fraud.

    Depends on the terms of his contract. As sorry as it is, it IS entirely possible that everything this guy is doing is on the up and up... not to say he isn't a colossal douche bag of the highest order, but there is no guarantee he's actually committing a crime.

    I've done work with government agencies before, it is appalling how willing some are to just piss away money for no good reason.

    This guy could have some per Diem rates applied and simply filling in the details for each. It really does come down to specifics. Same thing with having others do his work, he was contracted for it... he provided it. The fact that he is a dick and having "underlings" do it is irrelevant so long as he puts his name to it and signs off on it.

    Keeping people in for observation is and reaping the rewards of follow up is also not illegal unless he is falsifying information to keep them there.

    About the only thing I can maybe think of is if there is some sort of ethical/professional issue with him sending untrained people to interview. May or may not have any teeth however, as they are there on behalf of him.

    What it really comes down to in the end... is that if you want this guy to pay the piper, you really need to find out the specifics of what his contracts entail. Without that you are basically just watching him be a money grubbing dick.

    EclecticGroove on
  • Options
    werehippywerehippy Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Again with the "talk to your local attorney general" with a side of "document everything you can" (things like specific dates he took a trip he double/triple billed expenses for, occasions he had someone review documents for him, cases he told someone to fake hours (flip through this and bill for 4 hours), you get the idea. Specific information will be immensely helpful when it comes to prosecution.

    As to all the different things, it depends on details but pretty much every single thing here is textbook fraud. Expenses you explicitly submit are reimbursed, not a part of your payment for the job, so billing multiple people a greater dollar value of expenses than you really incurred is fraud. Allowing non-certified healthcare professions to gather and look at confidential medical information is almost certainly a HIPPA violation, and then billing for it as if you did it and used it to make your medical assessment is almost certainly fraud. Billing for 9 hours of travel in total on a 3 hour trip is, again barring a look at the invoices submitted and the work contract, almost certainly fraud. Etc on down the line.

    werehippy on
  • Options
    ascannerlightlyascannerlightly Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    remember: wrong =/= illegal
    c4tch wrote: »
    How do you think the billing is handled? He bills each public defender separately as if he has made three separate trips to see these inmates.
    does he actually, specifically tell them that he has made seperate trips? i doubt it. charging for food/gas/lodging for each case (client?) is totally valid. he states up front (in writing, i'd assume) how much his hourly rate is to go see person x to perform duties y and/or z and that expenses for said trip are to be paid for as well, and the person from the state that hires him to perform duties y and/or z agree to these terms. it would be the same thing if he was in that county on personal business that same day and went to see person x while he was down there.

    "fraud" would be him claiming he made seperate trips to go see each individual and then billing seperately (ie: lying).

    ascannerlightly on
    armedroberty.jpg
  • Options
    RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    remember: wrong =/= illegal
    c4tch wrote: »
    How do you think the billing is handled? He bills each public defender separately as if he has made three separate trips to see these inmates.
    does he actually, specifically tell them that he has made seperate trips? i doubt it. charging for food/gas/lodging for each case (client?) is totally valid. he states up front (in writing, i'd assume) how much his hourly rate is to go see person x to perform duties y and/or z and that expenses for said trip are to be paid for as well, and the person from the state that hires him to perform duties y and/or z agree to these terms. it would be the same thing if he was in that county on personal business that same day and went to see person x while he was down there.

    "fraud" would be him claiming he made seperate trips to go see each individual and then billing seperately (ie: lying).

    So, I'm a plumber, and you've hired me to install a new whirlpool tub for you. Included in the estimate for the installation we've agreed on $100 for my travel. A day before I'm supposed to do that a pipe bursts in your basement, and I agree to fix it while I'm there for the whirlpool installation. You're saying you'd be cool with me charging you an additional $100 for my travel when I bill you for the pipe repair, even though I was already going there for the tub install?

    c4tch: talk to someone in the state's AG office. They're the only ones who can decide if this is ok or not. It really doesn't matter what we all think. As someone who managed government contracts, however, I can say that if I found out about a contractor was double-billing for travel I'd be extremely pissed off.

    RUNN1NGMAN on
  • Options
    KetarKetar Come on upstairs we're having a partyRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    werehippy wrote: »
    Again with the "talk to your local attorney general" with a side of "document everything you can" (things like specific dates he took a trip he double/triple billed expenses for, occasions he had someone review documents for him, cases he told someone to fake hours (flip through this and bill for 4 hours), you get the idea. Specific information will be immensely helpful when it comes to prosecution.

    As to all the different things, it depends on details but pretty much every single thing here is textbook fraud. Expenses you explicitly submit are reimbursed, not a part of your payment for the job, so billing multiple people a greater dollar value of expenses than you really incurred is fraud. Allowing non-certified healthcare professions to gather and look at confidential medical information is almost certainly a HIPPA violation, and then billing for it as if you did it and used it to make your medical assessment is almost certainly fraud. Billing for 9 hours of travel in total on a 3 hour trip is, again barring a look at the invoices submitted and the work contract, almost certainly fraud. Etc on down the line.

    I'm going to go with "unlikely" on this one - otherwise it would be impossible for your basic front desk clerk/receptionist in a doctor's office to request, collect, and (if needed) summarize medical records for the doctor they work for.

    Ketar on
  • Options
    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »

    So, I'm a plumber, and you've hired me to install a new whirlpool tub for you. Included in the estimate for the installation we've agreed on $100 for my travel. A day before I'm supposed to do that a pipe bursts in your basement, and I agree to fix it while I'm there for the whirlpool installation. You're saying you'd be cool with me charging you an additional $100 for my travel when I bill you for the pipe repair, even though I was already going there for the tub install?

    Not the same thing.

    To use your analogy:
    You hired me to do a tub install, you agree to pay me $100 for travel.
    Your neighbor also hires me for the same day to fix a pipe burst, I also charge him $100 for travel.

    The fact that they happen on the same day is irrelevant to each of you.

    The only way this is illegal in the OP's situation is if this is all one giant contract (thus not separate bills), or something in his contract expressly forbids this sort of thing (which is unlikely). It may be dickish, but that doesn't make it illegal.

    EclecticGroove on
  • Options
    ZeonZeon Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »

    So, I'm a plumber, and you've hired me to install a new whirlpool tub for you. Included in the estimate for the installation we've agreed on $100 for my travel. A day before I'm supposed to do that a pipe bursts in your basement, and I agree to fix it while I'm there for the whirlpool installation. You're saying you'd be cool with me charging you an additional $100 for my travel when I bill you for the pipe repair, even though I was already going there for the tub install?

    Not the same thing.

    To use your analogy:
    You hired me to do a tub install, you agree to pay me $100 for travel.
    Your neighbor also hires me for the same day to fix a pipe burst, I also charge him $100 for travel.

    The fact that they happen on the same day is irrelevant to each of you.

    The only way this is illegal in the OP's situation is if this is all one giant contract (thus not separate bills), or something in his contract expressly forbids this sort of thing (which is unlikely). It may be dickish, but that doesn't make it illegal.

    This, times 1000. Nothing in the OP sounds particularily illegal. Morally wrong, yes, but not illegal. You are legally allowed to bill 3 different clients 3 seperate sets of "expenses", even if youre able to combine all of them into one trip or event. The fact you were in the neighborhood is irrelevant in regards to billing for travel and expenses. What if when he got out there, the client he was going to bill cancelled? How would you decide which client gets billed for travel and expenses then? Its actually fairly common practice to bill everyone for travel/expenses, charging more if theyre farther away. Its like a pizza place charging a flat fee for delivery as long as youre in their delivery zone. Dominos charges me 2.05 for delivery, despite the fact im 2 seconds away. They still charge my friend whos 10 minutes away the same delivery fee. And they can make 5 or 6 deliveries on the same trip, sometimes all of them in my building. Is that fraud because they were going to be here anyway? Nope, its part of their service charge.

    Zeon on
    btworbanner.jpg
    Check out my band, click the banner.
  • Options
    evilthecatevilthecat Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    My main "issue" with all of this is that mental health care professionals agree to certain ethics and codes of conducts, things which your current employer seems to be ignoring.

    If he's passing work down that he should be doing to untrained people .. well ..
    Would you want your boss to audit your mother in the event of a neurological/cognitive situation?
    Going further, how many people's lives has he messed up due to his negligence?

    evilthecat on
    tip.. tip.. TALLY.. HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
  • Options
    WulfWulf Disciple of Tzeentch The Void... (New Jersey)Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Not a professional by any measure of the word, but this also sounds like something for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, since he's doing services for the government. Hell, Its "one of the FBI’s top investigative priorities"

    Wulf on
    Everyone needs a little Chaos!
  • Options
    Eat it You Nasty Pig.Eat it You Nasty Pig. tell homeland security 'we are the bomb'Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    As some people have already pointed out, it's important to remember that billable hours are sort of a mess. A lot of things that intuitively seem like they should be fraud aren't, and occasionally there's even a good reason that they aren't. Ask a lawyer how he returns his phone calls sometime, if you feel like having a dark laugh.

    That being said, whatever department of the state you work for undoubtedly has general counsel that you could talk to in confidence. Most state and regional governments have pretty strong whistleblower protections in place.

    Eat it You Nasty Pig. on
    NREqxl5.jpg
    it was the smallest on the list but
    Pluto was a planet and I'll never forget
  • Options
    SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I agree. Don't do anything unless you're ok with your boss getting completely free because none of this is illegal, you get fired, and make an enemy out of a very rich and connected man. Doesn't sound worth it to me.

    Simpsonia on
  • Options
    Eat it You Nasty Pig.Eat it You Nasty Pig. tell homeland security 'we are the bomb'Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    what? that isn't what I said at all.

    Eat it You Nasty Pig. on
    NREqxl5.jpg
    it was the smallest on the list but
    Pluto was a planet and I'll never forget
  • Options
    ForarForar #432 Toronto, Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    I agree. Don't do anything unless you're ok with your boss getting completely free because none of this is illegal, you get fired, and make an enemy out of a very rich and connected man. Doesn't sound worth it to me.
    ‘All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing’

    I'd like to join the side of the bandwagon that suggests speaking to a lawyer and see what they say.

    Forar on
    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKER!
  • Options
    ronzoronzo Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Ketar wrote: »
    werehippy wrote: »
    Again with the "talk to your local attorney general" with a side of "document everything you can" (things like specific dates he took a trip he double/triple billed expenses for, occasions he had someone review documents for him, cases he told someone to fake hours (flip through this and bill for 4 hours), you get the idea. Specific information will be immensely helpful when it comes to prosecution.

    As to all the different things, it depends on details but pretty much every single thing here is textbook fraud. Expenses you explicitly submit are reimbursed, not a part of your payment for the job, so billing multiple people a greater dollar value of expenses than you really incurred is fraud. Allowing non-certified healthcare professions to gather and look at confidential medical information is almost certainly a HIPPA violation, and then billing for it as if you did it and used it to make your medical assessment is almost certainly fraud. Billing for 9 hours of travel in total on a 3 hour trip is, again barring a look at the invoices submitted and the work contract, almost certainly fraud. Etc on down the line.

    I'm going to go with "unlikely" on this one - otherwise it would be impossible for your basic front desk clerk/receptionist in a doctor's office to request, collect, and (if needed) summarize medical records for the doctor they work for.

    this is the important part. Clerks and the like are certified/authorized to look at certain part of your medical history, and therefore are not in violation of HIPPA. If they looked at the wrong parts though, like say test results or other such info, they can get into big trouble.

    From the way the OP told us, i doubt the people looking through it are all cleared to look at these medical records. Even if you can't make fraud stick, HIPPA is a whole different ballgame

    ronzo on
  • Options
    Sir CarcassSir Carcass I have been shown the end of my world Round Rock, TXRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    HIPAA

    I work in the insurance field :P

    edit: And I'm not sure exactly how HIPAA works, but I know if your job duty includes viewing patient information, then you can, but sharing it with someone else is a violation. I can probably find the specifics on our network, but they may be in the clear.

    Sir Carcass on
  • Options
    HeartlashHeartlash Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Even if you find out nothing he's doing is illegal, if you plan on leaving the job I'm sure you could talk to some of his federal clients and get him chewed out or at worst, blacklisted. He sounds like he deserves it.

    Heartlash on
    My indie mobile gaming studio: Elder Aeons
    Our first game is now available for free on Google Play: Frontier: Isle of the Seven Gods
  • Options
    TL DRTL DR Not at all confident in his reflexive opinions of thingsRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Ketar wrote: »
    werehippy wrote: »
    Again with the "talk to your local attorney general" with a side of "document everything you can" (things like specific dates he took a trip he double/triple billed expenses for, occasions he had someone review documents for him, cases he told someone to fake hours (flip through this and bill for 4 hours), you get the idea. Specific information will be immensely helpful when it comes to prosecution.

    As to all the different things, it depends on details but pretty much every single thing here is textbook fraud. Expenses you explicitly submit are reimbursed, not a part of your payment for the job, so billing multiple people a greater dollar value of expenses than you really incurred is fraud. Allowing non-certified healthcare professions to gather and look at confidential medical information is almost certainly a HIPPA violation, and then billing for it as if you did it and used it to make your medical assessment is almost certainly fraud. Billing for 9 hours of travel in total on a 3 hour trip is, again barring a look at the invoices submitted and the work contract, almost certainly fraud. Etc on down the line.

    I'm going to go with "unlikely" on this one - otherwise it would be impossible for your basic front desk clerk/receptionist in a doctor's office to request, collect, and (if needed) summarize medical records for the doctor they work for.

    When I worked at an entry-level pharmacy position, everyone there had to undergo a HIPAA training and certification process.

    edit: And respect to the OP. Lesser individuals would be tempted to blackmail.

    TL DR on
  • Options
    DeebaserDeebaser on my way to work in a suit and a tie Ahhhh...come on fucking guyRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    HIPAA certification isn't an actual certification. It's your company training to cover their ass in the event that you get busted for violating HIPAA.

    Having your staff compile medical records when you have a professional interest in the records is not a violation.

    This dude seems like a complete prick, but it doesn't seem illegal. Morally shocking, yes. Criminal, no.

    Deebaser on
  • Options
    witch_iewitch_ie Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    From what the OP has stated, there are no HIPAA violations going on. I would question his (the boss's) methods of analysis though if he has untrained people at the interviews. It depends on the state laws regarding that sort of thing though. The right kind of lawyer might know and going to the state psychiatry board might be a possibility. That said, in my experience, many mental health professionals (not all) do make highly morally and sometimes legally questionable decisions in dealing with mental health patients. Since they are a vulnerable population to begin with, these practices continue.

    With regard to keeping your job, I think you really should consider looking for another one if you can't stand what's going on. Even if you were to report this (even annonymously to avoid any backlash), there is a very real possibility that beyond and investigation, nothing would happen. If you don't see a good way to change the situation, you can still change your situation.

    witch_ie on
  • Options
    kaliyamakaliyama Left to find less-moderated fora Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    triple-billing for travel time is some combination of waste, fraud and abuse. google "waste fraud and abuse hotline" + your state. call them. if that doesn't give you a way to whistleblow, look up state auditor. case closed.

    kaliyama on
    fwKS7.png?1
  • Options
    SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Forar wrote: »
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    I agree. Don't do anything unless you're ok with your boss getting completely free because none of this is illegal, you get fired, and make an enemy out of a very rich and connected man. Doesn't sound worth it to me.
    ‘All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing’

    I'd like to join the side of the bandwagon that suggests speaking to a lawyer and see what they say.

    Yeah, yeah, here's another quote "good guys always finish last." Finishing last is exactly what will happen to OP if he goes around throwing accusations at respected (even if that respect if baseless) and connected members of the community.

    What happens if they believe him and his boss is arrested (considered the best case scenario by the rest of the posters,) his boss goes to jail, practice folds and OP loses his job and becomes known as a whistleblower. He now has to explain himself for the rest of his life to future employers because they may not know the full details and may be cautious of hiring a whistleblower.

    Now the worst case, and more likely scenario, accusations are found baseless, OP gets fired, makes an enemy of his ex-boss and is potentially unenmployable anywhere the old boss may have connections to.

    I was merely cautioning the OP to think about the outcomes before taking any rash decisions. Life isn't like comic books where the hero gets the girl and the badguy always goes to jail.

    Simpsonia on
  • Options
    kaliyamakaliyama Left to find less-moderated fora Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    Forar wrote: »
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    I agree. Don't do anything unless you're ok with your boss getting completely free because none of this is illegal, you get fired, and make an enemy out of a very rich and connected man. Doesn't sound worth it to me.
    ‘All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing’

    I'd like to join the side of the bandwagon that suggests speaking to a lawyer and see what they say.

    Yeah, yeah, here's another quote "good guys always finish last." Finishing last is exactly what will happen to OP if he goes around throwing accusations at respected (even if that respect if baseless) and connected members of the community.

    What happens if they believe him and his boss is arrested (considered the best case scenario by the rest of the posters,) his boss goes to jail, practice folds and OP loses his job and becomes known as a whistleblower. He now has to explain himself for the rest of his life to future employers because they may not know the full details and may be cautious of hiring a whistleblower.

    Now the worst case, and more likely scenario, accusations are found baseless, OP gets fired, makes an enemy of his ex-boss and is potentially unenmployable anywhere the old boss may have connections to.

    I was merely cautioning the OP to think about the outcomes before taking any rash decisions. Life isn't like comic books where the hero gets the girl and the badguy always goes to jail.

    Maybe this is your chicago sensibility flaring up here, but just because he's a gov't contractor with some PDs doesn't mean he's boss tweed. i'm not sure where you're getting this "he will crush you" mentality from. i mean, i'm sure he's vindictive. but he's just an expert witness who bilks the state. simpsonia, it feels like you're reading a different OP than i am.

    You're right that he could end up losing his job if he whistleblows. and he should talk to the relevant gov't office about whether activities constitute misconduct before filing a report, but otherwise I disagree.

    kaliyama on
    fwKS7.png?1
  • Options
    SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    kaliyama wrote: »
    Maybe this is your chicago sensibility flaring up here, but just because he's a gov't contractor with some PDs doesn't mean he's boss tweed. i'm not sure where you're getting this "he will crush you" mentality from. i mean, i'm sure he's vindictive. but he's just an expert witness who bilks the state. simpsonia, it feels like you're reading a different OP than i am.

    You're right that he could end up losing his job if he whistleblows. and he should talk to the relevant gov't office about whether activities constitute misconduct before filing a report, but otherwise I disagree.

    Hah, maybe you're right about a Chicago sensibility. I was just cautioning the OP because I know two damn fine attorneys who've had their careers and professional reputations destroyed due to making accusations of professional misconduct (one baseless, the other completely merited,) neither of which ended up in any repercussions against the accused parties.

    Simpsonia on
  • Options
    kaliyamakaliyama Left to find less-moderated fora Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Simpsonia wrote: »
    kaliyama wrote: »
    Maybe this is your chicago sensibility flaring up here, but just because he's a gov't contractor with some PDs doesn't mean he's boss tweed. i'm not sure where you're getting this "he will crush you" mentality from. i mean, i'm sure he's vindictive. but he's just an expert witness who bilks the state. simpsonia, it feels like you're reading a different OP than i am.

    You're right that he could end up losing his job if he whistleblows. and he should talk to the relevant gov't office about whether activities constitute misconduct before filing a report, but otherwise I disagree.

    Hah, maybe you're right about a Chicago sensibility. I was just cautioning the OP because I know two damn fine attorneys who've had their careers and professional reputations destroyed due to making accusations of professional misconduct (one baseless, the other completely merited,) neither of which ended up in any repercussions against the accused parties.

    That's depressing. You mean they ratted somebody else out to the state bar? I do think that is chicagoish, but lawyers look out for their own in every state. While law-related, I think this is a bit different. What sort of crazy things were going on that your friends felt compelled to report them? Discovery stuff, client billing?

    kaliyama on
    fwKS7.png?1
Sign In or Register to comment.