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Switching to OSX

meekermeeker Registered User regular
edited October 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
So I got a new job, yay me!

New job is at a company that uses shiny new Macbooks instead of the bland industrial Thinkpads I am used to. I know Win operating systems and hardware like the back of my hand, but I haven't had to rely on a Mac for more than browsing since High School (1994)

Any ideas for tips and tricks? How about a crash course somewhere on the web? I believe they use MS Office suite of these Macs, almost positive of that, so I have that taken care of.

Are all the mice those ergonomically painful little pucks?

Do they all have light up Apples on the back? (I think this would be appreciated in Advertising.)

meeker on

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    ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited October 2010
    I'm sadly behind in OSX; I didn't have enough money to replace my powerbook when it died a few years ago.

    I can tell you that whatever your macbook may come with, you can plug in and use just about any mouse and it will work fine, just like with any other computer.

    ceres on
    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
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    adytumadytum The Inevitable Rise And FallRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    The Apple store is a good start.

    They have one-on-one training available.

    Check if your work will arrange it for you.

    adytum on
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    EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    It's a really user friendly OS. If you're at all computer savvy you shouldn't have an issue using it. Just bang around a little and you'll figure it out.

    Esh on
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    FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I suggest checking out the navigation buttons on the F-Keys. There's some cool stuff there to help navigate between windows. The touchpads are actually pretty good with macs - once you get used to the two finger scrolling thing - PC's will frustrate the hell out of you.

    Other than that, I found switching to be pretty intuitive. Go and have a hunt through the system preferences, and figure out what the disk utility does etc. That's pretty much the basic usage tools right there. Then just getting used to the little things... Closing a window may not close an app, preferences (options menus) are usually located in the same drop down menu for all apps etc.

    I also use the spotlight function as a great quick-launcher. (apple-space). If you have the opportunity to use your laptop at home, and are into that kind of thing - the iLife suite is awesome.

    Enjoy! I probably wont go back. I dont tend to evangelise apple - but I definitely prefer it.

    Fallingman on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    TertieeTertiee Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    The Apple site (http://www.apple.com/support/switch101) has some nice information about switching though I found the following page to have the most bits (http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2514). For keyboard commands you can normally replace anything done with the Control button with the Command (Apple) button. Command-C for copy, command-F for find, etc

    Tertiee on
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    proXimityproXimity Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Fallingman wrote: »
    Closing a window may not close an app

    This is one of the most common errors I've seen from somebody switching to a Mac, to actually quit 99% of programs, you need to actually quit it, not just close it with the red button in the corner.

    Otherwise... most everything that Fallingman said is pretty good advice, especially using Spotlight (Command-Space) as an app launcher and quick find (and also as a calculator)

    proXimity on
    camo_sig2.png
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    TrentusTrentus Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    proXimity wrote: »
    Fallingman wrote: »
    Closing a window may not close an app

    This is one of the most common errors I've seen from somebody switching to a Mac, to actually quit 99% of programs, you need to actually quit it, not just close it with the red button in the corner.

    This is really something a lot of people don't understand. Basically, in Windows, you're used to a window representing an application. Close the window, and the application closes. In OS X, a window represents a document. Close a window and you close the document you're working on. You do not close the application. It will continue to run even if there are no documents loaded.

    Trentus on
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    BartholamueBartholamue Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Apple+q is your friend.

    Bartholamue on
    Steam- SteveBartz Xbox Live- SteveBartz PSN Name- SteveBartz
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    EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    You're probably used to using your pinky (and taking your hand off the home row) for hotkeys. On OS X, use your thumb to hit the command/apple key; simply slide it over from the spacebar. You'll probably find hotkeys easier to use since your fingers will know where they're supposed to be.

    EggyToast on
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    meekermeeker Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    These are all good. I have 2 weeks to study up before I start, so keep these coming.

    What about working with files? What is the OSX equivalent of Explorer?

    And am I right that there is no right click context menu?

    meeker on
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    TertieeTertiee Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    The OS X equivalent is called Finder. It works pretty much the same as Explorer though for some reason you can't cut and paste files. You can copy and paste or move files by dragging them with the mouse but cutting is disabled.

    Tertiee on
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    LewishamLewisham Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    meeker wrote: »

    And am I right that there is no right click context menu?

    No, there is. You just need to ctrl+click or use a two button mouse to get it to appear.

    Lewisham on
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    KPCKPC Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    meeker wrote: »
    What about working with files? What is the OSX equivalent of Explorer?

    The OSX Finder isn't too different than Windows Explorer. It does help you find files pretty quickly, though, through the use of smart folders that aggregate files according to specific filters. On the sidebar, by default, you can see all the files that have been accessed Today, Yesterday, and in the Past Week. In addition, it also collects all your Images, Movies, and Documents. It doesn't keep a separate copy, it just filters all of yor files into neat piles. You can also create your own smart folders that have your own specific filters.

    Spotlight is also great as a file searching tool. The default command is Cmd+Space. It searches files and applications, and even the text inside of text files in case you forgot what the name of the file was. I use it as my application launcher, and it works well enough. Cmd+Space and start typing the first 3 letters of the app I want to launch, press return, and it launches.

    Also, tap space when in the Finder to QuickLook at files. If it is an image, text file, pdf, or .mov file you can preview it without having to launch an application to view it.

    KPC on
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    FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    meeker wrote: »
    These are all good. I have 2 weeks to study up before I start, so keep these coming.

    What about working with files? What is the OSX equivalent of Explorer?

    And am I right that there is no right click context menu?

    New apple mice all have the ability to right click. Same with the touch pads. Command-click does the same.

    Fallingman on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    WezoinWezoin Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    I found the first week or so it was a bit odd, but after that it just kind of hits you at how much easier it is to use and everything just seems natural. Just give it a try without training and lookup any specifics you're having trouble with.

    Wezoin on
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    proXimityproXimity Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    No, he's right, you can't CUT files, you can only copy.

    proXimity on
    camo_sig2.png
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    EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    edited October 2010
    Heck, the recent Macbook models have zero buttons on the trackpad. Just tap with one finger for a regular click, two fingers for a right-click.

    Also, scroll with two fingers.

    The two-finger scrolling in particular is so good. I can barely use other trackpads now because I keep trying to scroll with two fingers.

    Echo on
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    EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Echo wrote: »
    Heck, the recent Macbook models have zero buttons on the trackpad. Just tap with one finger for a regular click, two fingers for a right-click.

    Also, scroll with two fingers.

    The two-finger scrolling in particular is so good. I can barely use other trackpads now because I keep trying to scroll with two fingers.

    I didn't know about the two-finger click. Thanks!

    Esh on
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    EchoEcho ski-bap ba-dapModerator mod
    edited October 2010
    Another random OS X tip: you can copy text with Cmd-C. But if you hit Cmd-C twice, the selection gets appended instead of replacing what you have in the clipboard.

    Echo on
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    The_Glad_HatterThe_Glad_Hatter One Sly Fox Underneath a Groovy HatRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Echo wrote: »
    Another random OS X tip: you can copy text with Cmd-C. But if you hit Cmd-C twice, the selection gets appended instead of replacing what you have in the clipboard.

    wow.

    (i'd insert the pic of neo going "wow", but i'm at work..)

    definately trying that one out at home...

    The_Glad_Hatter on
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    FagatronFagatron Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Echo wrote: »
    Heck, the recent Macbook models have zero buttons on the trackpad. Just tap with one finger for a regular click, two fingers for a right-click.

    Also, scroll with two fingers.

    The two-finger scrolling in particular is so good. I can barely use other trackpads now because I keep trying to scroll with two fingers.

    No, they still have buttons, they're just not separate from the trackpad. They also have the equivalent of TWO buttons which was amazing to me having not really used a Mac in forever.

    It really pisses me off that the two finger scrolling in Windows 7 on my Macbook is not as good as it is in OS X. It doesn't have inertia at all and it's really fucking twitchy even though it's using the Bootcamp Control Panel/Drivers. I am 90% sure this is a driver issue on Apple's end and they don't make it better because they'd rather make Windows look bad, it is frustrating.

    I find Finder counter intuitive. I wish OS X had an equivalent to the Explorer bar instead of me having to dig around in a file or application's properties to find what the actual path is. It is alright though.

    I really like the Macbook for general use and internets browsing, Expose makes everything nifty and just a lot smoother, if they would fix the drivers I wouldn't see nearly as much of a difference. I like Windows better for everything else (games, specific applications, etc.).

    Learn about Symlinks. It probably won't be superimportant 99% of the time, but it is something I found useful when I was setting it up to work alongside my Windows, with a shared Storage partition for media and applications, and I could see it coming up if you're ever dealing with creating network shares or something.



    Overall I am actually kind of disappointed at the lack of differences between OS X and other Unix derived operating systems. After I wrapped my head around the GUI I found out that I already knew most of backend stuff in Terminal and I found I wasn't bullshitting near as much as I thought I was in job interviews when I'd tell an interviewer I had a solid grasp of how it worked because of my knowledge of Linux.

    Fagatron on
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    FagatronFagatron Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    Echo wrote: »
    Heck, the recent Macbook models have zero buttons on the trackpad. Just tap with one finger for a regular click, two fingers for a right-click.

    Also, scroll with two fingers.

    The two-finger scrolling in particular is so good. I can barely use other trackpads now because I keep trying to scroll with two fingers.

    I didn't know about the two-finger click. Thanks!

    Esh, other nifty things:

    Put four fingers on the trackpad and pull down to bring up all your open windows. From here you can highlight a different window with one finger, and then push up with four fingers to make that window active. Alternatively you can just use this to check on other windows and just push back up with the four fingers immediately to bring the same window back to the front.

    Three fingers swiped left to right will go forward in a series of pictures or forward in a browser, three fingers right to left does the opposite.

    They also have the pinch zoom and twisty things (turning a picture) that the iOS has.

    I think there are a couple others that are slipping my mind because I don't use them as much. They are all in the documentation for sure because IIRC you bought the same model as me (13" Pro?).




    Also if you decide to run Windows and you use the Bootcamp drivers (only way to make it work as far as I know), you will still have the two finger right click, and two finger scrolling.

    Fagatron on
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    TrentusTrentus Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Fagatron wrote: »
    I wish OS X had an equivalent to the Explorer bar instead of me having to dig around in a file or application's properties to find what the actual path is. It is alright though.

    Do you mean like the address bar? There's the Path Bar (toggle on or off in the view menu), which shows you, well, the path. It's not an editable text field or anything, but it does let you double click any directory within the path and go straight to it.

    I prefer this little config file tweak that displays the posix path in the title of a Finder window. At the terminal type:
    defaults write com.apple.finder _FXShowPosixPathInTitle -bool YES
    and then restart the Finder
    killall Finder

    If you're actually hoping for somewhere you can type a path and then be whisked to it, you might as well just use the "Go to Folder" dialogue. You're fingers will have to be on the keyboard at some point, so the extra step of using a keyboard shortcut (⇧⌘G) isn't much more of a hassle. It supports tab completion too!

    Trentus on
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    admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Also, if you drag a file or folder into a Terminal window it'll paste the path.

    admanb on
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    SarksusSarksus ATTACK AND DETHRONE GODRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    For more trackpad gesture fun I'd recommend Better Touch Tool. It allows you to create custom gestures that are specific to an app or universal. In Chrome I swipe up with three fingers to create a new tab and I swipe down with three fingers to refresh the page. It's unbelievably convenient.

    http://blog.boastr.net/?page_id=1722

    I just got a MacBook Pro and I've been using it almost exclusively instead of my PC. It's really not difficult to use at all. The structure of the filesystem and what system preferences are available will probably be the most difficult hurdle. Also realize that a lot of applications, especially native ones, install from a dmg image file that you mount. On the image file is the application file and you just drag it into the applications folder. In order to uninstall the application drag the application out of the folder and into the trash. You may have to go into the application support folder which is located at users/username/library/application support and see if the application installed anything else there. It's not super tidy but it's easier than keeping your registry clean.

    Sarksus on
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    Brodo FagginsBrodo Faggins Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    System preferences is the OS X equivalent of Control Panel, except it's actually usable. By default it's in your dock, but if not, it's in your Applications folder.

    When you download a program, they'll usually be inside a .dmg file (which is equivalent to a disk image file). You open it up, and inside will be the app. Simply drag the app to your Applications folder and that's it, it's installed. Other programs will be a .mpkg or .pkg, which is the OS X equivalent of a .exe installer file. Double click that, and you're good to go.

    Afterwards, DRAG THE .DMG FILE TO YOUR TRASH (which will now be an eject icon). I can't tell you how many times I've seen someone with a skype or aim dmg file on their desktop.

    For pretty much every program ever, the preferences will be reachable by hitting command + comma. Finder has one, in addition to a right click menu that you can use to change your settings (how big file icons are, how far apart they're spaced, what color you want a specific file to be highlighted, etc).

    Brodo Faggins on
    9PZnq.png
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    Brodo FagginsBrodo Faggins Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Oh and this is important: if you're torrenting files and you find your Mac keeps going to sleep when left alone, go to System Preferences -> Energy Saver -> Uncheck "Put hard disk to sleep whenever possible".

    Brodo Faggins on
    9PZnq.png
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    BoomShakeBoomShake The Engineer Columbia, MDRegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Sarksus wrote: »
    You may have to go into the application support folder which is located at users/username/library/application support and see if the application installed anything else there. It's not super tidy but it's easier than keeping your registry clean.

    Install App Trap. It'll check for and ask you about extra files when you go to empty the recycle bin (if there's an app in it).

    BoomShake on
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    FallingmanFallingman Registered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Oh man, I remember when I first switched, and I loaded a dmg file. I spent way too long looking for an installer. The image was on a CD, and I kept double clicking it but it wound up running the app.

    About 20 minutes later I remebered a friends sagely advice for switching from Windows.

    "If you can't do something, chances are you're overcomplicating it"

    It never occured to me that it would be as easy as dragging the app into my applications folder...

    Fallingman on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited October 2010
    Fallingman wrote: »
    Oh man, I remember when I first switched, and I loaded a dmg file. I spent way too long looking for an installer. The image was on a CD, and I kept double clicking it but it wound up running the app.

    About 20 minutes later I remebered a friends sagely advice for switching from Windows.

    "If you can't do something, chances are you're overcomplicating it"

    It never occured to me that it would be as easy as dragging the app into my applications folder...

    Some .dmgs open a folder which has the app and then a big arrow pointing to a symbolic link to your Applications folder. It's pretty cute.

    admanb on
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