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Strategies for the procurement of kittens

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    VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Yea the first thing to do would have been to put it in the litterbox and then show it the food and water. Move the litterbox near where it's hiding.

    VisionOfClarity on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    It came out and came to me so I picked it up and put it in the room with the litterbox for several minutes.

    Jasconius on
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    VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    You should be good to go then. If you ignore it for a bit it'll probably get curious and come back to you again. Are you going to let it sleep with you or get in your room?

    VisionOfClarity on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    probably

    Jasconius on
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    MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    If you really want to cement that bond quick, open up a can of tuna.

    It will probably go apeshit.

    MuddBudd on
    There's no plan, there's no race to be run
    The harder the rain, honey, the sweeter the sun.
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    Regina FongRegina Fong Allons-y, Alonso Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    The cat isn't hiding from you, it's already realized you're safe. It's hiding from the large expanse of unexplored, unknown space that is your apartment. It will take some time for it to feel comfortable.

    Regina Fong on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    It came out for about 30 minutes, walked around, ate a few bites, back to the sofa. Doesn't stand still long enough for me to take a picture.

    I know it's not hiding from me, it comes up to me.

    Jasconius on
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    Kate of LokysKate of Lokys Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    You should come up a name for her sooner rather than later, and start using it. This is important for two reasons: first, gentle repetition of the name* will teach the cat to respond to it, making her feel at home; secondly, seeing adorable kitties referred to as "it" makes me sad.

    * The odds are about 50-50 that you'll just end up calling her "kitty" all the time anyway, of course, but it's still nice to have something more formal.

    Kate of Lokys on
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    FiggyFiggy Fighter of the night man Champion of the sunRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I second cementing its name early. It is awesome to have your cat come to you when you call her.

    Figgy on
    XBL : Figment3 · SteamID : Figment
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    next time it comes up to you pick her up and put her in teh box and gently dig with her feet in it. sure she knows how to use the box but you want her to know that that is her box to use.

    mts on
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    FyreWulffFyreWulff YouRegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2011
    4. Inside cats are safe and happy cats. They are not stuck somewhere, starving to death. They are not roadkill. They are not accidentally going through the Rottweiller's yard during morning walkies. Keep your cats inside. :)

    There is a cultural difference here between the US and the UK. US cat owners believe all cats should be indoor cats, and it is abusive to let them out. UK cat owners generally believe the opposite. However the OP is using American spelling so your advice is probably good.

    US resident here, all our cats since I was a kid have been outside cats. All lived to be about 18-19, one lived to be 20-21.

    I definitely would not let a cat be an outside cat in certain locations. Where I lived was definitely okay, I wouldn't do it where my apartment is right now on the other hand. Too many feral cats around here.

    But they'll also be perfectly fine if they stay inside forever. They have to be inside cats forever if they've been declawed, by the way.

    FyreWulff on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    It's been sneezing quite a bit since it got here. It's been under my sofa for about half the time and there is some dust down there. But when it's out it seems normal and healthy. When I say quite a bit, I mean once or twice per hour.

    Also it's been home for about 24 hours now and it hasn't used the litterbox, or gone to the bathroom at all (as far as I can find), but it IS eating and drinking. Normal?

    Jasconius on
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    MushroomStickMushroomStick Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Run the scooper/sifter thing through the litter. Maybe she buried the evidence.

    MushroomStick on
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    MuddBuddMuddBudd Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Trust me, if it's using the bathroom somewhere else the apartment, you'd be able to smell it.

    MuddBudd on
    There's no plan, there's no race to be run
    The harder the rain, honey, the sweeter the sun.
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Cat says hi
    2d1kxv.jpg

    Sometimes when it sneezes it's a little violent... and it's not a sneeze. It's almost hairball-esque... a repetitive raspy sound for a couple of seconds.. but nothing happens. It's done it 2 or 3 times today.

    But it did finally use the litterbox

    Jasconius on
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    LadyMLadyM Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    ADORABLE. Love the diamond on her nose.

    LadyM on
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    OnTheLastCastleOnTheLastCastle let's keep it haimish for the peripatetic Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Let the cat hide. It is normal for the cat to not use the litter box for awhile while it is still nervous. It will also prefer to use it when you're not around for awhile.

    Many cats from shelters will have an upper respiratory infection and/or ear mites. They're super common at shelters and when one cat gets them, they all do. No big deal, just have the cat into the vet this week for a regular checkup.

    Cats are by nature nervous in new environments. Just sit down and read a book and she'll come out and say hello eventually.

    OnTheLastCastle on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    It's already mostly adjusted, it doesn't like my loud chair movements though.

    Only thing wrong is the sneezing. Other cats at the shelter were sneezing too so I guess it just caught something.

    Jasconius on
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    VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    When are you taking it to the vet for a look over?

    VisionOfClarity on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Probably this week if it keeps sneezing. Need to find one that isn't too expensive.

    What's a reasonable price for a cat checkup?

    Jasconius on
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    VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    It really depends on the area. Ask around to any friends you know with a cat for a recommendation.

    VisionOfClarity on
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    HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    The range in my area is huge, from $70 to $200. Price doesn't always mean quality, either. My vet charges $85 for a standard visit, and is substantially better than the one I used to go to, who cost almost $150. Main beef with that guy was that since my cat gets uneasy with being handled by people other than me, they had to sedate him. Which is one thing, but doing it without telling me and then saying, "Oh, he's just tired," when I pick him up is another.

    Hevach on
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    bwaniebwanie Posting into the void Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Aurin wrote: »
    Don't know if this is an issue for you, but some apartments will insist that cats be declawed.

    And it's the most evil thing in the world. Avoid those apartments. :evil:

    In some areas, that'll be pretty much every apartment.

    well fuck them right in their ear.

    bwanie on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    My cat, who is now named Lemon, sneezed quite a bit overnight, but not so far today.

    The vet didn't have an appointment until tomorrow afternoon.

    What can I give a cat to feel better about sneezing until then?

    Jasconius on
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Jasconius wrote: »
    My cat, who is now named Lemon, sneezed quite a bit overnight, but not so far today.

    The vet didn't have an appointment until tomorrow afternoon.

    What can I give a cat to feel better about sneezing until then?
    scritches

    mts on
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    MushroomStickMushroomStick Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Just try to keep the cat away from dusty places. Or, I dunno, vacuum or something.

    Also, if the vet starts nickel and diming you to death, don't feel obligated to stay with them. A few years ago my mother was a little naive and got milked for somewhere around 2 grand because a vet tricked her into having them perform all kinds of blood/stool tests over and over again to determine that 2 kittens were perfectly healthy the entire time. Hopefully you wont run into that, but it does happen.

    MushroomStick on
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    EntriechEntriech ? ? ? ? ? Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Jasconius wrote: »
    My cat, who is now named Lemon, sneezed quite a bit overnight, but not so far today.

    The vet didn't have an appointment until tomorrow afternoon.

    What can I give a cat to feel better about sneezing until then?
    If their eyes are looking gummy or they've got some dried snot or something, you can wipe their face with a warm, damp cloth. Besides that just hug and love the kitty.

    Entriech on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Its eyes look fine and there really isn't anything on its nose.

    Its behavior and appearance is normal.

    Just sneezes.

    Jasconius on
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    AsiinaAsiina ... WaterlooRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Yeah, my cats were both sneezing when I first got them from the shelter. It was just a common upper respiratory thing. The shelter gave me the medication they were on at the time (some antibiotics) and I had to give them the pills for about a week.

    The vet will probably give you something similar.

    Asiina on
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    CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    It may be a cultural thing, but the life expectancy of an indoor cat far outweighs an indoor/outdoor (by roughly 6-7 years) and a straight outdoor cat (by 13!). The life expectancy of outdoor cats in America is around 2 years. I mean stats always vary, but those were from the Humane Society a year or two when I looked.

    In America. In the UK it does not seem to make much difference, as long as there are not busy roads nearby. I just worry that the preponderance of Americans on the internet means that cat owners in the UK will get confused by all these threads stating that it's abusive to let cats outdoors. We often absorb a lot of US culture by cultural osmosis.

    It's also possible for UK cat owners to give US cat owners bad advice by saying "Let your poor cat out! She'll be bored indoors!", so I find it good to point out the split of opinion here.

    CelestialBadger on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Cat sneezing is becoming less frequent but still present. Vet is going with the "probably just a cold" route, and gave me what appears to be some vitamin supplement paste to feed it twice a day to boost its immune system I guess?

    It doesn't seem to be doing much playing of exploring on its own, more exactly, the only room it seems interested in is the bathroom where I don't want it to go yet.

    The only play it gets is when I actually play with it, which I can't do much more than an hour or two per day. I may have to get it a friend soon.

    Jasconius on
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    VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    What kind of toys do you have for it?

    VisionOfClarity on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    plastic balls with the bell in it (which it had in its cage at the shelter and seemed to like), some cloth mice with catnip, and the thing with the furry apparatus on a plastic stick that I wave around at it.

    And a laser pointer.

    It likes the laser pointer and plastic stick thing.

    naturally, the two things I have to operate manually


    Just noticed it has been sneezing most violently today when its licking its paws.

    The cat litter I am using if called "feline pine" and was recommended to me by a friend. Could a cat be allergic to that somehow? That being something that would be on its paws and cause it to sneeze more when it had to deal with its paws.

    Jasconius on
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    VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    You can get toys similar to the plastic stick that hang off of doors or are on top of cat towers so it can play with them alone. You can get laser pointer toys that are battery operated and wiggle around and stuff or one that you can put on the floor and will send the laser around. I wouldn't stress too much about it though. My cat is pretty playful (she loves the bell balls too) and she still prefers to flop on the couch and nap most of the day.

    VisionOfClarity on
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    EntriechEntriech ? ? ? ? ? Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Jasconius wrote: »
    The cat litter I am using if called "feline pine" and was recommended to me by a friend. Could a cat be allergic to that somehow? That being something that would be on its paws and cause it to sneeze more when it had to deal with its paws.
    Your cat may be sensitive to the composition of feline pine. I personally just use a simple clumping clay litter. The cheapest stuff that the pet store sells. If you want to switch things up to see, go ahead and buy some cheap clumping clay (Make sure to get unscented. Perfumes in litter can irritate your cat's nose). Your cat's old enough it won't do something idiotic and kitten-like such as giving itself a cement shoe, it's easy as hell to clean up, and shouldn't be too dusty.

    I can't stress unscented enough. Perfumes are for the sake of humans, not the animal. Any well maintained litter box isn't going to have an odour. Ours doesn't.

    Entriech on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Hmm. I grabbed a bit of it fresh out of the box and held it up to her nose and she didn't really have a reaction other than "why are you making me smell this, dumbass".

    I'm not sure that's proof of anything. She's certainly using the litterbox.

    I don't know. If it doesn't clear up in a couple of days then I'll have to try something else.

    Jasconius on
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    EntriechEntriech ? ? ? ? ? Ontario, CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Jasconius wrote: »
    Hmm. I grabbed a bit of it fresh out of the box and held it up to her nose and she didn't really have a reaction other than "why are you making me smell this, dumbass".

    I'm not sure that's proof of anything. She's certainly using the litterbox.

    I don't know. If it doesn't clear up in a couple of days then I'll have to try something else.

    It could just be a good old respiratory infection. It'll be fine.

    Entriech on
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    republic of merepublic of me Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Jasconius wrote: »
    I'm thinking about getting a cat(s) either this weekend or next.

    I recently started a job where I am home all the time and I have no roommates or family or pets so it's basically a tomb.

    I'm going with a friend to some rescue shelters to scout. But I have questions.

    1) Do cats benefit significantly from having another cat to play with? I'll be around a lot so it's not like it will be isolated, but I am not a cat. I don't know what cats need. So the essence of the question is if two cats are better than one cat for the sake of the cats wellbeing.

    cats like company but make sure they are both neutred or you will end up with an army of inbred cats in a few years

    2) What do I need to buy or do to prevent the wholesale destruction of my furniture. Particularly from clawing and excessive shedding. Does diet come into play? Recommendations there? Toys to dissuade them from using my nice sofa?

    there is realy no way out of this. nothing works except to get a loose covers for your furniture and let them shred away and take off the covers when you have company

    3) Do cat breeds or gender impact personality? I would prefer to have a more... exuberant variety of feline. I've seen them before! But I've also seen ones that basically just occupy space on an ottoman somewhere for 20 hours a day.

    cant help you here i have only ever had strays and rescue cats

    4) Unfortunately in my neighborhood I could not let them outside at all. Way too many cars and high traffic roads. Does that impact them too much?

    not realy just give them plenty toys, litterbox train them and play with them a lot
    kthx!

    republic of me on
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