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Cooking MEAT

FagatronFagatron Registered User regular
edited May 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
In a pan, stovetop, without cream, milk, excessive amounts of butter, or sauces that are primarily sugar.

Suggestions needed are for beef, but more for chicken, which needs more coaxing to taste good.

Cooking stuff in the oven is also a possibility if it doesn't take too long.

Fagatron on

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    RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    1 Large Ziploc bag
    4 Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts
    3/4 Cup Olive Oil
    1/4 Cup Balsamic Vinegar
    2 Tbsp Italian Seasoning

    Place the Chicken Breasts in the Ziploc bag. In a small bowl, combine the Olive Oil, Vinegar, and Italian Seasoning. Mix well, and pour into Ziploc. Seal most of the Ziploc, then suck out as much air as possible (you're going for a vacuum pack sort of thing). Let Chicken marinate 24 hours, then Bake, Barbecue, or Pan Fry. Baking takes about 40 mins @ 350f, Pan Frying takes about 7 minutes a side on medium heat. Barbecue takes a little less than Pan Frying. Whatever method you choose, Poultry should always reach an internal temperature of 180f to be considered safe.

    Ruckus on
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    Skoal CatSkoal Cat Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I've been doing all of my meat sous vide for several months now. Haven't looked back.

    Skoal Cat on
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    soxboxsoxbox Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Secret No 1: Get a cast iron pan.

    Heat it til it can't heat no more. Put salt and pepper on steak. Put a steak in 3 minutes each side. Eat steak. Once you're doing that, you can just flavour that with mustard / relish / gravy, or just enjoy the beauty of a nice steak all on it's lonesome.

    Secret No 2: Wrap it in prosciutto.

    Chicken: Get a breast, stuff it with some basil (fresh? pesto?), maybe some cheese. Wrap it in proscuitto, toothpick it together. Brown in a pan, Cooks in about 30 minutes in the oven.

    Beef: Best. Get an eye fillet roast - do something like this: http://munchandnibble.blogspot.com/2008/09/jamie-oliver-and-prosciutto-wrapped.html - Cooks in 30 minutes. Best. Roast. Ever.

    soxbox on
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    RaekreuRaekreu Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    May not quite be what you're after as it uses honey, but the amount isn't a lot:

    4 Chicken Breasts/8 Thighs/whatever amount of chicken fits in a 13x9x3" pan, glass for preference
    Lemon Pepper
    1-2 tbsp. Honey
    1-2 tbsp. Soy Sauce
    1.5-2 cups Chicken Stock/broth - doesn't need to be soup base strength

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place your chicken in a glass pan, skin side up, and fill in the gaps with the chicken broth with about 1-2 tbsp. of soy sauce added. You don't need too much broth, say 1/3", not enough to float the chicken or anything. Drizzle the chicken with honey - again, not too much is needed. I reckon that 2 tbsp. is enough to cook 6 chicken breasts. You can brush it on for an even coat but I almost never bother. Once the honey is on, sprinkle the lemon pepper blend over the chicken. Less is more - too much will make a lemony abomination of a meal rather than tasty food. Cook until done, ie 165 degrees F. Usually takes about 45 minutes or so.

    Raekreu on
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    JavenJaven Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Just a quick caveat on doing steak/chicken (but especially steak) on the stove top.

    Yes, you want a cast iron pan. Yes, you want said pan to be branding iron hot. I usually just chuck my pan in a 500 degree oven for a while to get it nice and warm, then put it over a stove top burner turned all the way on high before I sear something. But one thing you really want to know is this: Know what your stove top is capable of.

    The house we just moved into has electric. Electric tends to have the weird habit of having its burners have widely varying temperatures for each one. My front left burner gets crazy hot, hot enough where I can get a nice sear just over medium heat. The back right one, though, is much weaker, and have to crank it all the way up to get some decent browning.

    Javen on
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    illigillig Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Slow cooker!

    Seriously, you throw a hunk of mediocre meat in, add fluid and seasoning, and 6 hours later you have a delicious, fall off the bone version of whatever animal you started with.

    If you want fast, a high temp grill will make short work of almost anything and turn it into a seared and moist hunk of deliciousness. And a grill doesn't need sauces - only dry spices.

    illig on
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    be very aware that searing a steak on a cast iron is going to smoke like a pipe.

    usually when i cook steaks stovetop style i do a sear on either side and then finish in the oven. time will vary on thickness.

    i usually pan fry chicken, just give it a light dusting of flour (there is an actual technical term for this but its escaping me) and then brown with a touch of oil in the pan. then add sauce and vegies or whatever

    mts on
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    StraygatsbyStraygatsby Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Oh god, man. Don't cook glorious meat stovetop! Do you have to? Do you have access to any kind of grill? If not, at least bake the chicken. Rub it in olive oil lightly, season it, and put it in a covered pan/casserole at 375 for 30-60 minutes. Do you have a broiler? Do the beef there.

    Stovetop cookin for meat should only be done if it's a stew. It's a felony crime against good taste otherwise.

    You didn't mention if you have a gas or electric range. If it's electric, just kill yourself now. :P

    Straygatsby on
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    PeenPeen Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    It's another appliance but a George Foreman grill is the best method I've found for making good chicken quick. Throw a few breasts on there and they'll cook pretty much perfectly, after that you can doll them up however you like.

    Peen on
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    DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    IMO stuff like boneless skinless chicken breasts (I'm guessing that's what you want to cook from your requirements) needs a lot of doctoring to not taste bland.

    Stir fry, takes a lot of prep but cooks very quick.

    Break down your veggies (can be anything, carrots, onion, mushroom, bell pepper, baby bok choi, etc). The key is to get the pieces all of similar size, I prefer a small chop or julienne for quicker cooking. Set aside.

    Get some rice going in your preferred method.

    Break down the chicken breast into thin strips, place in ziplock bag and add a marinade. Can be any marinade, but I think for balance you need to have salt, citrus, acid, sweet, heat, and pungent. So I might do Ponzu/Soy, juice and zest of lime/lemon, light vinegar, honey/agave nectar, cayenne/chile del arbol, and garlic/ginger (grated or powdered). If chicken is cut thin then marinade can be quite short (10-15 minutes).

    Get a pan real hot on cooktop, add a couple turns of peanut or sesame oil. Throw in chicken and make sure each piece gets contact with the pan. Should brown quickly. Turn once. When lightly browned on both sides remove meat and reserve to a covered bowl.

    Allow pan to get hot again, add a couple turns of oil. Throw in veggies, stirring occasionally so everything gets to touch the bottom of the pan. Getting stirfry veggies right takes a bit of practice: it goes from raw, to perfect, and then 5 seconds later the veggies start releasing all their water into the pan. I prefer to err towards raw instead of watery, but watery still tastes fine, it just won't have much crunch and doesn't look as nice.

    Dump veggies into bowl of cooked meat and combine. Season to taste. If you want to get fancy you can add pan roasted peanuts, cilantro, and bean sprouts. Serve over rice.

    Djeet on
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    Angel177Angel177 Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    mts wrote: »
    be very aware that searing a steak on a cast iron is going to smoke like a pipe.

    usually when i cook steaks stovetop style i do a sear on either side and then finish in the oven. time will vary on thickness.

    i usually pan fry chicken, just give it a light dusting of flour (there is an actual technical term for this but its escaping me) and then brown with a touch of oil in the pan. then add sauce and vegies or whatever

    This! A thousand times this.

    Angel177 on
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    Skoal CatSkoal Cat Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    mts wrote: »
    be very aware that searing a steak on a cast iron is going to smoke like a pipe.

    You need an oil with a high smoke point, something like a nut oil. I use walnut.

    Skoal Cat on
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    RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Skoal Cat wrote: »
    mts wrote: »
    be very aware that searing a steak on a cast iron is going to smoke like a pipe.

    You need an oil with a high smoke point, something like a nut oil. I use walnut.

    I use peanut oil, safflower, sunflower, and sesame are also popular choices.

    Ruckus on
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    i don't use any oil. just dry rub and that goes directly on the pan

    mts on
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    Skoal CatSkoal Cat Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    How the hell does it not stick?

    Skoal Cat on
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    honestly i think if it gets hot enough it sears then releases, same thing happens with a grill.

    If its cast iron then its the seasoning. The pan i use is pretty heavy not sure if its Cast iron or not but it may be one of those ingrained with non-stick, not an actual coating. i got it at ikea and its surprisingly been high quality.

    it does get a little bit of stuff burn onto th epan but it comes off easily

    mts on
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    Shazkar ShadowstormShazkar Shadowstorm Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    eh if stuff burns just toss some red cooking wine on it

    BAM stuff comes off and you have sauce for your steak

    Shazkar Shadowstorm on
    poo
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    OverOver ...laser cats? Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Ruckus wrote: »
    Whatever method you choose, Poultry should always reach an internal temperature of 180f to be considered safe.

    http://modernistcuisine.com/2011/03/yes-you-are-overcooking-your-food/

    The "safe" cooking temperatures were established before modern meat production and even then were quite arbitrary. This has led to chicken and pork getting this horrible reputation of requiring cooking till dried out and bland before being safe. Just putting that out there.

    The rest of your recipe, however, is a solid, easy, great meal (I make it quite a bit, but with fresh rosemary and garlic instead of italian seasoning). Just don't overcook it.

    Over on
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    Skoal CatSkoal Cat Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    God I want that book.
    I cook my chicken to 165 because hey, I have that kind of control in my sous vide setup and thats what the government tells me is safe. From my understanding, the chicken industry isn't exactly cranking out Grade A clean and healthy meat, so cooking to a safe temp means better safe than sorry.
    180 is really high though. I could do 145-150 with a fresh breast that I knew was safe and be fine.

    Skoal Cat on
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    BagginsesBagginses __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2011
    Skoal Cat wrote: »
    I've been doing all of my meat sous vide for several months now. Haven't looked back.

    That sounds like the most boring table ever, although I suppose it gets you good gored gored.

    Anyway, one trick I've read is that you can chill the beef and cut it into small enough slices that you can caudal it by pouring the sauce over it while hot.

    Bagginses on
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