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What to take on a 2 day camping trip?

Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better.Registered User regular
edited July 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
Hey,

I never really spent multiple nights outdoors. I spent a night outdoor, but never 2 nights outdoors.

So what should I bring? What are the must haves? What should I know? How much should I budget towards this?

Casually Hardcore on

Posts

  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Hey,

    I never really spent multiple nights outdoors. I spent a night outdoor, but never 2 nights outdoors.

    So what should I bring? What are the must haves? What should I know? How much should I budget towards this?

    What are you doing (hiking, canoeing, etc), are you part of a group, is there any resources or tasks you have been specifically assigned, and do you need to feed yourself?

    Ruckus on
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Ruckus wrote: »
    Hey,

    I never really spent multiple nights outdoors. I spent a night outdoor, but never 2 nights outdoors.

    So what should I bring? What are the must haves? What should I know? How much should I budget towards this?

    What are you doing (hiking, canoeing, etc), are you part of a group, is there any resources or tasks you have been specifically assigned, and do you need to feed yourself?

    There's canoeing, and I'm sure there'll be hiking. This is part of a group and we do have a list going on. But as of now the list consists of 'Booze, food, tents, canoe' .

    Casually Hardcore on
  • Skoal CatSkoal Cat Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    An extra change of dry everything + more socks. A way to make fire. A sharp folding knife. A folding chair is a nice luxury if you can fit it. First aid kit. Plastic zip top bag for electronics and valuables, ideally in some sort of floating container for capsizing mishaps.

    Skoal Cat on
  • RikushixRikushix VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Where are you staying and what kind of facilities are there? Is it a provincial/state campground or a private campground or a rec campground or a deserted logging road? If it's fairly rustic, bring clean water and toilet paper.

    If you are going for an extended hike, especially if it's on an unmarked trail, confirm the plans with your group and tell someone where you guys are going. Bring a basic first aid kit if you have one. If you were going on a longer trip or one structured around the backcountry I would recommend you build your own emergency kit (small tarp, matches, foil, flashlight, etc). You can never be too safe.

    Rikushix on
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  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    I think this is a pretty popular campground, it isn't like we're going to battle our way through the congo (I hope). I think this is one of those, 'drive your car here, park, pitch a tent, and call it camping!' kind of places.

    Casually Hardcore on
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Ruckus wrote: »
    Hey,

    I never really spent multiple nights outdoors. I spent a night outdoor, but never 2 nights outdoors.

    So what should I bring? What are the must haves? What should I know? How much should I budget towards this?

    What are you doing (hiking, canoeing, etc), are you part of a group, is there any resources or tasks you have been specifically assigned, and do you need to feed yourself?

    There's canoing, and I'm sure there'll be hiking. This is part of a group and we do have a list going on. But as of now the list consists of 'Booze, food, tents, canoe' .

    Booze - Plastic bottles.

    Food - Cans of food like beef stew is good, pancake mix, eggs (maybe), noodles. A lot depends on if you have cold storage or not; bacon is excellent, as is potatoes, ground meat, peppers, and onions for hobo meal. One 10" cast iron skillet is all you need. Things like salt/pepper, foil, towels may also be needed.

    Tents - Do you have one? You can get an OK 3-season at Target or on-line cheaper for around $100. Usually subtract one person from whatever it says for gear.

    Canoe - REI?

    MichaelLC on
  • KillgrimageKillgrimage Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Flashlight or lamp of some kind, I know I always have to get up in the night to pee.

    Extra clothes, especially underwear and socks, and put them in a ziplock bag or something in case it rains.

    Bug spray, a rain poncho, a mess kit (or some paper plates/cups that you will dispose of properly)

    Pillows! It sucks using your knapsack.

    I may think of more stuff, but you are going to a campground so things are a lot simpler.

    Killgrimage on
  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    1x Camping Pack
    4x Socks, White (pairs)
    3x T-Shirt
    2x Pants, Cargo, Cotton
    4x Underwear
    1x Long sleeve hoodie
    1x Light jacket
    1x Swimming Trunks
    1x Towel
    1x Sleeping Bag
    1x Air Mattress or ground pad
    1x Wide Brim hat
    1x Canteen
    1x Life jacket
    1x Rain Poncho
    1x Body/Hair wash (100mL bottle)
    1x Deodorant stick
    1x Toothbrush
    1x Toothpaste
    1x Sunscreen (SPF 30+)
    1x Insect repellent (I prefer Muskol, non-spray)
    1x Flash light
    1x Lighter
    1x Alcohol of choice (recommend plastic mickey bottle)

    I also recommend you put all of the smaller items in ziploc bags.
    All of the clothing should be packed in a garbage bag, squished, twist-tied, then placed in a second garbage bag that's also squished and twist-tied.
    Your sleeping bag should be packed the same way, garbage bag in garbage bag inside the sleeping bag sleeve.
    If placed in a canoe, you pack should be tied or strapped to one of the crossbars.
    All of these measures ensure that in the case of catastrophic canoe failure, you'll have dry clothes and a dry sleeping bag that won't float away or sink.

    Ruckus on
  • [Michael][Michael] Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Duct tape is very useful for fixing things that break, as is rope or twine. Garbage bags are also good to have handy for all sorts of things (keeping wet/dry things separated, hanging foodstuffs up, emergency ponchos, etc.).

    Wet tissues are good for keeping your hands (and anus) clean.

    Also, campground water doesn't always taste the best, so you might wanna bring something to flavor it, like Kool-Aid or Gatorade powder.

    If no one is particularly experienced with making a fire, you might wanna bring some lighter fluid.

    [Michael] on
  • RuckusRuckus Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Water wise, we travel with a 5 Gallon pail with a tight fitting lid. In travel, it holds most of our pans, utensils, and juice pitcher. At camp, the first thing that we do is take out the contents, go down to river or lake, and get a bucket of the cleanest water we can. We treat it using Clorox bleach (instructions here).

    The water is used for drinking, both straight and mixed with Tang at breakfast, lunch, and supper.

    Food wise, remember that any meats will either have to be cured or consumed early in the trip. Usually on our trips, we plan for the first evening meal to be fresh meat, usually pork. We partially freeze it in a ziplock bag(s), and by the end of the first day it's about 80-90% thawed, but still cool, and we cook it on a grill over the fire. We usually have a bag garden salad and Italian dressing to start the meal, maybe some mini-carrots. The bag salads actually can usually be edible the second night as well.

    Breakfast the first morning in camp usually has bacon, which we completely freeze raw before the trip. By the first morning on the trail it's thawed, and we cook it up in the cast iron pan first, set it aside in a camp pot, and pour the grease into a spare metal pan or mug, then mix up pancake batter and make pancakes in the cast iron pan, adding a bit of bacon grease between batches to lube the pan. A new small bottle of maple syrup will be more than enough for 6 of you. The next days we usually go with those oatmeal packets where you just have to add water (we mix it up in our camp mugs). Lately we've gotten spoiled and started taking a coffee percolator and making real coffee, but for years we just brought instant coffee.

    Lunches for us are always basic, bread (heavy canadian rye that doesn't squish in the pack), cheese (Medium Cheddar, Jalapeno Pepperjack, swiss), sausage (precooked Garlic, Kolbassa, or Mennonite farmer sausage rings), trail mix, bagels, with tang to wash it down.

    The following dinners I've used on canoe trips, and can be prepared easily on a standard Coleman 425 camp stove in a 2L (2 Quart) pot with a decent lid.

    Garlic Sausage Jambalaya:
    1x pack of Zatarain's Jambalaya mix
    1x 300g Garlic Sausage (precooked ring)
    2x tbsp oil
    2 + 1/2 Cups of water

    You combine the water and oil and bring it to simmer, dicing the garlic sausage while you wait, then add the diced sausage and Jambalaya mix and stir. Put the cover on and let it simmer for about 25-30 minutes, until most of the water has been absorbed, then take it off the heat and let it sit for about 5 minutes, stir and serve. This will feed about 3-4 canoeists, this last weekend I doubled it and it was about the perfect amount for 6 of us.

    Macaroni and Cheese with Ham:
    1x Box of Mac and Cheese brand of choice (not Kraft Dinner)
    6 Cups of water
    1/4 Cup of Milk (reconstituted from powder)
    1/4 Cup of Margerine
    3x 156g Tins of flaked ham

    Start the water boiling then add the Macaroni pasta, it will take about 15-20 minutes to cook, so at this point open up the ham and dice it into chunks (I like to go about 1/2 inch chunks). When the pasta is ready, carefully pour off the excess water (this is where a good lid, steady hand, and practice come into play) into a nearby lake or river (don't pour it on the ground near your camp), do not return the pot to heat. Add the cheese powder from the mac and cheese kit and the milk, and stir until the sauce achieve's it's proper creamyness. At this point I also like to add some good cheese, like cheddar or pepperjack that you probably have in you food packs anyway, as well as the diced ham. Stir it up and let it sit for a couple minutes for the ham and additional cheese to heat up and marry with the rest of it, then stir again and serve. The basic version again would feed 3-4 people, most trips I go on we double it.

    Ruckus on
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    just to clarify, this is not a canoe trip. This is a 'hey I have a canoe! Lets go to the lake!' trip. Which is cool, cause I took a class in canoeing and I enjoyed it a lot. Went down river and did some rapids.

    Anyway, I'm going to use that jambalya ingredient! Maybe the mac and cheese one too. Thanks.

    Casually Hardcore on
  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    edited July 2011
    if you're camping by the water and/or going on the water, you can never, never have enough towels and changes of clothes. Also a way to hang your wet clothes out to dry...

    amateurhour on
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  • spool32spool32 Contrary Library Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    I am amazed that toilet paper hasn't been repeated yet, because it needs to be.

    Toilet Paper.

    Also, a small first aid kit is great to have. You never know wtf might happen, especially if you're also bringing booze and using fire.

    spool32 on
  • wonderpugwonderpug Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Campfires are fun. You should have one. Check if you're allowed to bring your own firewood, and if so, bring your own firewood. Most places don't let you gather anything, so be sure to bring kindling. A hatchet comes in real handy, too, if you have access to one. Some places only let you use firewood purchased from the park ranger, so be sure to check.

    wonderpug on
  • EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Note that a lot of the stuff on the lists above are to make sure you enjoy the experience. I generally consider a series of if/then statements for camping necessities. For example:

    Am I going to be doing a lot of physical work? If yes, then bring ibuprofen. Will there be bugs? If yes, then bring bug spray or itch cream. Am I a fussy sleeper? Am I OK with dirt? Can I sit on the ground?

    Whenever I go camping I make sure to bring enough that I will survive the experience, which generally means a first aid kit and food. That's the important stuff. The rest is to make it an enjoyable experience, such as chairs, stoves, tents, utensils, fire things, etc.

    The most important thing to bring camping is not ingredients for smores. Which means that if your group of friends is talking about who's bringing the stuff for smores, you probably don't have much to worry about. Figure out where you're sleeping, how you're sleeping, where you're eating and how you're eating. Camping is basically an exercise in logistics.

    For comparison, when my family went camping when I was a kid, my mom would essentially pack the kitchen, which means you need to camp not too far from the car. If you're close to the car, then just think to yourself "ok, what am I doing on friday" and then "what am I doing on saturday" and then "what am I doing on sunday morning."

    EggyToast on
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  • GalFridayGalFriday Community and Social Media Manager NovatoRegistered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Here is what I always bring. Multiple days were the norm for me growing up and we always survived.
    Camping Supplies List
    1. Lantern and/or flashlight (I prefer lanterns for nostalgia, but flashlights can be handier)
    It is always nice to see things at night and the campfire isn't always enough light

    2.Hatchet
    Cut wood, cut rope, cut cobs of corn in half. Hatchets are great

    3. Tent
    Obviously some sort of shelter.

    4. First aid kit with bug spray and alcohol
    Rubbing alcohol. Booze is a personal choice ;) Bring bandages, antiseptic, and bug spray

    5. Candy bars
    You may burn the food and you will need a snack. Anything high in carbs is good. Also, make s'mores.

    6. A tarp
    Before pitching your tent put a tarp down. Even if the ground does not look wet it can be damp and it is nice for that cold to not seep into your sleeping space.

    7. Map
    Yes a map. A paper one. Cellphones do not always work when camping so having an analog map is a spiffy idea.

    8. Lots of socks
    No one likes wet feet. Be prepared.

    9. Toilet paper
    Seriously bring it. That leafy plant over there that you are eyeing up to use? Poison Ivy. Yeah.

    10. Food!
    Consider if it will spoil before bringing it. Dry goods are a nice option as well.

    11. Cooler with a lock!
    Racoons are smart. And hungry. They will open your cooler, they will eat your food. If you can't find a cooler with a lock then lock it in your car when you are gone or asleep.

    12. Cast Iron skillet
    Use it for everything! Wash by pouring water into the skillet and bringing it to a boil. Helpful at home as well




    :D

    GalFriday on
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  • splashsplash Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Wanna throw this tidbit in that a wearable headlight is infinitely better than a flashlight!

    And earplugs

    splash on
  • duffleheaddufflehead Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    is this car camping or river camping?

    sunscreen

    kindling and matches in a ziploc

    check the area that you are going to be staying for what is required. Most places, in the NW at least, require bear proof canisters. You'll need some rope to haul that up to a tree as well.

    dufflehead on
  • wonderpugwonderpug Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    How far NW do you need to dangle bear canisters in a tree? Almost every car camping campground in California has big steel lockers at each site for you to use.

    wonderpug on
  • SyrdonSyrdon Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    splash wrote: »
    Wanna throw this tidbit in that a wearable headlight is infinitely better than a flashlight!
    Seconding this!
    Also, its been mentioned a bunch, but: have a first aid kit and know how to use it. For that matter, having someone who has taken a basic first aid course is a good idea, but that's harder on short notice

    Either way more water than you think is reasonable or a way to purify water you find.

    For a canoe trip, consider what stuff you need to have waterproofed and what is ok if it gets a bit wet. Depending on how much crap you are bringing, you may need to a way to get it secured in the canoe.

    I'm not sure where you are in the country (or, actually, which country) but plan for wildlife causing problems.

    Rope for suspending your stuff from a sturdy branch 10ish feet from the trunk is the usual suggestion I believe. Whenever possible, clean anything that smells like food. Trash goes up the tree too.

    Depending on your area, you may want bear spray. If you are bringing it, put some thought in to where you are putting it and how that will affect things if you need to use it.

    Syrdon on
  • duffleheaddufflehead Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Wonderpug,
    That's why I was asking if it was car camping or river camping. Not all campsites have places to store your bear canisters especially when it's just an area off of a river.

    dufflehead on
  • tinwhiskerstinwhiskers Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    A knife, Something to make fire. A camera crew to document your wilderness survival skills.

    tinwhiskers on
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  • EWomEWom Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Wow, you guys really know how to rough it! It sounds like you guys are going on a month long excursion with your checklists and essentials. It's 2 nights.. take some clothes, take some bug spray, sunscreen, a rope, and towel.

    And for the love of god, don't take your cellphone, kindle, ipad, DS, PSP, or anything like that.

    EWom on
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  • DoctorArchDoctorArch Curmudgeon Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    Get a cheap folding camp chair from a local sports supply store (in the Northwest, you'll find this at either Bi-Mart or Fred Meyer). You'll want one to lounge around in when you're eating dinner (if there isn't a table) or around the campfire.

    For entertainment, when you have downtime in a tent or later, bring a book or a DS.

    DoctorArch on
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  • Gilbert0Gilbert0 North of SeattleRegistered User regular
    edited July 2011
    My priorities are as follows

    - Water - Is there clean water or do you have to bring it?
    - Food - Bring more than meals, snacks like trail mix disappear quick
    - Something to cook the food with - matches for fire or small stove or have all dried food
    - Tent
    - Sleeping bag / blankets / pillow - whatever you need to sleep in and crash. I know friends when they car camp, just sleep in the passenger seat

    Everything else is just to make your stay more comfortable but I would suggest

    Changes of clothes - I usually bring +1 of the # of days I'm gone
    Hat
    **PLAYING CARDS** different people know different games and can teach others
    Flashlight
    Bug spray
    Sunscreen
    Tylenol
    Chair

    Gilbert0 on
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