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Computer nightmare

The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
edited December 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
So, about a week ago, the fan on my old Nvidia card died on me. No big deal; I replace the video card.

...Except, not. PCI-E has gone to 2.0 slots as a standard, and my board is old and has a 1.0 slot. So I have to replace the board. A bit more of a pain than I wanted, but whatever - get a new board, plug in the new graphics card, away I go.


Yesterday, after having my new set-up going without any problems at all for a few days, my rig suddenly just shuts-off. It was so abrupt that at first I thought the power had gone out; then I saw the monitor was still on. Try the power button, absolutely no response from the computer. Check the power outlet to make sure that it was fine, and yup, it's not the outlet. Turn the power supply off and on, try the power switch again, no response. She's just dead.

I figure it must be the power supply. So I go in today, get a replacement supply, go home to test it... nope. After getting it all plugged in, my computer refuses to respond to anything at all. \


I have no idea what could be wrong with it now. It's a brand new board, it doesn't smell like anything has overheated, I've unmounted my heat sink from the CPU and everything looks perfectly fine there.

Any ideas?

With Love and Courage
The Ender on

Posts

  • bombardierbombardier Moderator mod
    Not directly helpful, but you can check if a power supply works by jumping pins so you can figure out if it's the board or not.

    http://www.overclock.net/t/96712/how-to-jump-start-a-power-supply-psu-test-a-power-supply-and-components

  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    Did you reset the CMOS? While most Motherboards have jumpers to do this, I like to do this the old fashioned way and pop out the battery for 15 minutes, and put it back in. I'm assuming you aren't getting POST sounds, so otherwise, it's either the motherboard or power supply. With a new power supply, be sure to double check every single connection. Also, only plug in the bare minimum. If you have onboard video, use that and take out your new graphics card (another reason there could be no POST), just to eliminate the obvious things.

    8i1dt37buh2m.png
  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Yup, checked every connection about ten times now, so it's not that.


    ...If there were a processor problem, the unit should at least so something when connected to a powr supply, right?

    With Love and Courage
  • EsseeEssee The pinkest of hair. Victoria, BCRegistered User regular
    Since it doesn't seem to be the PSU, I would bet the motherboard spazzed out since that's the new part and the machine won't turn on. When my fiance's old, shorted out motherboard (improper installation, forgot to put those little... struts, is that what they're called?... underneath the board) finally died for good, the machine just stopped turning on entirely. Nothing at all happened when we pressed the power button after it had been limping along all that time, and that's how we knew it finally died. Everything else in the machine was fine (well, aside from the fact that the video cards got damaged by running with a shorted mobo for so long), replaced the board, good as new. It didn't smell like anything had burnt up in the machine, we just knew what had happened since the temps were previously showing up ridiculously high and we realized what had happened to it.

  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    My first guess would indeed be some kind of ground/short. But others with more expertise will be along.

  • StrifeRaZoRStrifeRaZoR Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    First, you need to rule out the possibility of another faulty PSU. Yes, it can happen. Do what bombardier posted and jump the computer without the power switch connected to the board. I usually use a flat head screwdriver to cross the two pins on the board. I've done the paperclip version that he posted, but it doesn't rule out faulty connectors on the board, just the PSU itself.

    Secondly, remove the motherboard completely. Take it out of the case and set it on a piece of cardboard or wood and try running the system outside of the case. If it works, then you know you have a short somewhere in the case. When running it outside the case, be sure to run only the things you need. A single stick of RAM, video card, PSU, and CPU. That's it. No hard drive or CDROM or anything like that. Just make sure you get it to turn on before adding things back to the case.

    Also, resetting the BIOS these days requires a jumper and removal of the battery. Remove the battery, then right beside the battery socket should be 3 jumper pins with a cap over two of them. Move the jumper over one pin so that it's reversed. Leave it like this for at least 3-4 minutes. Put the jumper back to it's default position, pop the battery back in, and see if it helps.

    StrifeRaZoR on
    StrifeRaZoR.png
  • MidshipmanMidshipman Registered User regular
    The Ender wrote:
    ...Except, not. PCI-E has gone to 2.0 slots as a standard, and my board is old and has a 1.0 slot. So I have to replace the board.

    Just for the record, you absolutely can put a PCI-E 2.0 card into a motherboard with a PCI-E 1.0 slot. You might not get the same performance as if the mobo supported PCI-E 2.0 bandwidth, but it will certainly work.

    midshipman.jpg
  • Hahnsoo1Hahnsoo1 Make Ready. We Hunt.Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    Midshipman wrote:
    The Ender wrote:
    ...Except, not. PCI-E has gone to 2.0 slots as a standard, and my board is old and has a 1.0 slot. So I have to replace the board.

    Just for the record, you absolutely can put a PCI-E 2.0 card into a motherboard with a PCI-E 1.0 slot. You might not get the same performance as if the mobo supported PCI-E 2.0 bandwidth, but it will certainly work.
    This is not 100% true. They are supposed to be compatible, yes. You are supposed to be able to take any current PCI-E 2.0, and it will work in a PCI-E 1.0 slot. But there are quite a few cards out there that either don't work at all or are so terrible in PCI-E 1.0 that you might as well buy a previous generation card instead. The most common problem are cards that draw more power than a PCI-E 1.0 slot can provide and do not provide a way to provide extra power to the card due to space/cooling reasons. Granted, not many of these cards exist, but places like Tom's Hardware and other tech forums are quick to point out if there are problems like this.

    Hahnsoo1 on
    8i1dt37buh2m.png
  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Yeah, I bought 3 different 2.0 slot cards, and none worked.

    With Love and Courage
  • RookRook Registered User regular
    edited December 2011
    Hahnsoo1 wrote:
    Midshipman wrote:
    The Ender wrote:
    ...Except, not. PCI-E has gone to 2.0 slots as a standard, and my board is old and has a 1.0 slot. So I have to replace the board.

    Just for the record, you absolutely can put a PCI-E 2.0 card into a motherboard with a PCI-E 1.0 slot. You might not get the same performance as if the mobo supported PCI-E 2.0 bandwidth, but it will certainly work.
    This is not 100% true. They are supposed to be compatible, yes. You are supposed to be able to take any current PCI-E 2.0, and it will work in a PCI-E 1.0 slot. But there are quite a few cards out there that either don't work at all or are so terrible in PCI-E 1.0 that you might as well buy a previous generation card instead. The most common problem are cards that draw more power than a PCI-E 1.0 slot can provide and do not provide a way to provide extra power to the card due to space/cooling reasons. Granted, not many of these cards exist, but places like Tom's Hardware and other tech forums are quick to point out if there are problems like this.

    This is a bit odd since both the PCIe 1.0 and 2.0 slots provide the same amount of power, 75W.

    Rook on
  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Sweet.

    I took my rig back to the place I got the parts from, and it turned out the new board was just bad. Replaced it for me, even replaced my heatsink at essentially no cost, refunded me the cost of the power supply, and hooked everything up for me at for about 6 bucks labor (insanely cheap, in my opinion). Excellent people to work with.

    If anyone is in Nanaimo, I highly recommend dealing with R U Computing. Good folks.

    With Love and Courage
  • EliminationElimination Registered User regular
    The Ender wrote:
    Sweet.

    I took my rig back to the place I got the parts from, and it turned out the new board was just bad. Replaced it for me, even replaced my heatsink at essentially no cost, refunded me the cost of the power supply, and hooked everything up for me at for about 6 bucks labor (insanely cheap, in my opinion). Excellent people to work with.

    If anyone is in Nanaimo, I highly recommend dealing with R U Computing. Good folks.

    Nanaimo BC?

    PSN: PA_Elimination 3DS: 4399-2012-1711 Steam: http://steamcommunity.com/id/TheElimination/
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