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Work stuff

Mike DangerMike Danger "Diane..."a place both wonderful and strangeRegistered User regular
So, here's the story:

I worked in an office at my college for 4 years part-time doing technical support-type work for "academic technology" (i.e. technology being used in educational ways). I enjoyed working there, the people in the office liked me, and when I left (a year ago), they all said how they'd be willing to act as a reference.

Since then, I worked full-time at a PC repair place, took a contract position in SF that didn't end up working out, and moved back to the East Coast. I decided to focus on jobs at colleges/universities, as a: 3 out of the 6 paying jobs I've had have been at schools, b: I really enjoyed working at that job I mentioned above, and c: it seems to be a field that's picking up steam.

Two days ago, I got a hit on one of my applications, which requested 3 letters of reference before the interview (a little unorthodox, in my experience, but w/e). I (foolishly) didn't have these on hand, so I wrote to my references. One of them was the supervisor from the college job above, who wrote back yesterday and said he'd be happy to. He also said in his response "FYI: We have a position opening up soon". I wrote back and told him I was interested, and asked him to send along any information he had. I haven't heard back from him since then.

Today, I saw that they put up the job description. I am sort of qualified for it: a lot of the responsibilities are similar to ones I had as an undergrad, but there's additional stuff that I don't have experience with (graphic design-type work, which I have never done, and video production, which I have only done as bare-minimum, "splice these two clips together" type stuff).

I feel sort of weird about this whole thing. A lot of the people I have talked to have said "oh, they totally want you for this", but I feel like I haven't had that much experience since I worked there as an undergrad, and that this was just my old boss being nice. I also feel weird going through the whole selling-yourself job application thing when I know a lot of the people involved and they know me.

tl;dr: I don't even know, see above.

Steam: Mike Danger | PSN/NNID: remadeking | 3DS: 2079-9204-4075
oE0mva1.jpg

Posts

  • DivideByZeroDivideByZero Social Justice Blackguard Registered User regular
    What is your question here? "Should I apply for this job?"

    Sure, yeah, apply for the job. What's the worst that could happen?

    First they came for the Muslims, and we said NOT TODAY, MOTHERFUCKERS
  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    Go for it. All the best jobs are filled through social networks, not the conventional wisdom resume spam to ad route. That's why things like the "Old boy's network" are so notorious, and why the jobless are advised to "network."

    Also you are never completely qualified for any job worth having; that's how you gain experience and skills.

  • Mike DangerMike Danger "Diane..." a place both wonderful and strangeRegistered User regular
    Any tips on how to write a cover letter for this type of thing? As I said above, it feels weird writing this given that the people there know me. Do I just write it as if it were any other job?

    Steam: Mike Danger | PSN/NNID: remadeking | 3DS: 2079-9204-4075
    oE0mva1.jpg
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Here's the real question: Are you willing to devote time to learning how to do those things?
    Good workers are always in short supply, so if you have a good worker who doesn't have the skills but has the will, it's a no brainer. In addition, the guy already knows he gets along with you, which is the other huge question mark around hiring.
    Write your cover letter with a basis around things you'd like to learn and expand on your skill set and how much you enjoyed your prior job and the challenges it gave you.

  • Mike DangerMike Danger "Diane..." a place both wonderful and strangeRegistered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    Here's the real question: Are you willing to devote time to learning how to do those things?
    Good workers are always in short supply, so if you have a good worker who doesn't have the skills but has the will, it's a no brainer. In addition, the guy already knows he gets along with you, which is the other huge question mark around hiring.
    Write your cover letter with a basis around things you'd like to learn and expand on your skill set and how much you enjoyed your prior job and the challenges it gave you.

    Sure - graphic design is something I wish I was better at, and video production would be a nice skill to have.

    One last question for you/others in the thread: when I'm writing this, do I use his first name, or should I say "Mr. X"? They both seem equally weird to me, but I'm leaning towards the latter.

    Steam: Mike Danger | PSN/NNID: remadeking | 3DS: 2079-9204-4075
    oE0mva1.jpg
  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    Here's the real question: Are you willing to devote time to learning how to do those things?
    Good workers are always in short supply, so if you have a good worker who doesn't have the skills but has the will, it's a no brainer. In addition, the guy already knows he gets along with you, which is the other huge question mark around hiring.
    Write your cover letter with a basis around things you'd like to learn and expand on your skill set and how much you enjoyed your prior job and the challenges it gave you.

    Sure - graphic design is something I wish I was better at, and video production would be a nice skill to have.

    One last question for you/others in the thread: when I'm writing this, do I use his first name, or should I say "Mr. X"? They both seem equally weird to me, but I'm leaning towards the latter.

    Go with Mr. It's more professional, and you have no assurances that he'll be the only one to read the cover letter.
    I don't know if sounding too familiar could hurt your chances, but it's not a risk I'd want to take.

  • Mike DangerMike Danger "Diane..." a place both wonderful and strangeRegistered User regular
    Gotcha. Thanks!

    (this isn't a thread closure - I haven't sent anything in yet. If anyone wants to chime in with any thoughts, please feel freee!)

    Steam: Mike Danger | PSN/NNID: remadeking | 3DS: 2079-9204-4075
    oE0mva1.jpg
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    Take the job. Nothing wrong with getting a job with help from a friend or family member. Half the positions I was ever hired for came that way, and all of them worked out well and were invaluable career markers. Remember it only gets you in the door it doesn't give you a license to coast, and if your friend talked you up your going to want to bust your ass every day, at least for the first few months to prove yourself.

  • usul512usul512 Registered User regular
    Go for it. I just applied for an internal vacancy at my current office so I'm still in that mind space. Definitely go with Mr, show that you take the position seriously and you're doing things professionally. Having worked there before, you're in a great position to make your cover letter awesome. Highlight things you've learned since you last worked there, how you've grown, etc. This is a chance to reintroduce yourself.

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