Help with cat allergy

BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
We adopted a 5 year old furball last year who happens to be the sweetest cat I've ever come across. He loves to sit on laps, cuddle in bed, bump his head to us randomly and basically has never ever scratched or bitten even when first time strangers pay a visit and play rough with him. He is a champ.

Unfortunately the lady of the house is allergic to cats and we are trying to find a way to lessen her symptoms and giving him away is not a solution.

She is taking antihistamines daily but sometimes they don't work well. Besides, we are not sure of the long term side effects of regular antihistamine use. We are going to limit his access to the bedroom to at least have a less allergen filled sleeping space.

Things that we are considering:

1. Remove carpeting from the house to keep it cleaner.
2. Get a HEPA bagless vacuum cleaner.
3. Get a HEPA air purifier.
4. Trim the cat's hair 1-2 times a year? Not sure if this is good for him, if not we won't do it.

Any recommendations for the vacuum cleaner and air purifier for this specific purpose?

Here are the obligatory photos of the culprit:
kuw0om5c735s.jpg
t0o715endbya.jpg

i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

Posts

  • Edward CharetteEdward Charette Registered User regular
    Other than giving away your loved one(your pet) there are ways to reduce effects of allergy
    1) clean , keep surfaces and floors fur-free
    2)bathe the cat four to six weeks using cat shampoo
    3)Air purifiers can be agreat weapon against allergens
    4) Take an occasional allergic exam

  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    Seeing a doctor to try out different allergy medications should also probably be on that list. There are at least a couple different major kinds and one might work out better for her than over the counter stuff.

    ShadowfireElvenshaeAuralynx
  • BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
    Other than giving away your loved one(your pet) there are ways to reduce effects of allergy
    1) clean , keep surfaces and floors fur-free
    2)bathe the cat four to six weeks using cat shampoo
    3)Air purifiers can be agreat weapon against allergens
    4) Take an occasional allergic exam

    Giving him away is not an option for sure :)

    I always thought giving them baths was not good for them? Besides the allergens are from their saliva AFAIK, so he will probably lick himself for hours after a bath so I think it could be counter-productive? No?

    i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

  • BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
    Seeing a doctor to try out different allergy medications should also probably be on that list. There are at least a couple different major kinds and one might work out better for her than over the counter stuff.

    She's been to several doctors about it but their first recommendation is always "get rid of it". Then they all prescribe the same 3 or 4 antihistamines. I think doctors here (Istanbul, Turkey) just don't know jack about allergies.

    i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    I've heard good things about the effectiveness of air purifiers as well. We have a dog-allergic family friend who lives happily with a dog using an air purifier and a rigorous vacuuming and hand-washing regimen.

    Trimming the cat's hair probably wouldn't help because it's the proteins from his skin (basically dandruff) that cause the allergy, not the hair.

    You could also look into allergy shots. This is a type of immunotherapy where you're injected with the allergen in increasingly high doses over several months, then with a maintenance dose a few times a year for 3 - 5 years. The idea is to build tolerance so that your body no longer reacts as strongly to the relatively minor allergen doses in the environment. Symptoms should be greatly reduced within the first year and the results can last a lifetime. It does take some time and commitment though, and I have no idea how much it costs.

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  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Yeah, allergy shots are pretty much going to be the best answer here, but as someone who was in a similar situation (though with a dog), it may be that your only real options are adopting it out or living with a permanent head cold (or worse).

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  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    "Giving the cat away" doesn't have to mean abandoning him at a shelter. It isn't a pressing issue so you can keep him for now while putting out feelers for a good home for him - with people you know to be good people, not randoms who seem OK on Craigslist. If friends are taking care of him, you can visit him whenever you want.

    Elvenshae
  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    I'm allergic to cats but I have three cats. The only thing that's ever helped for my allergies is taking flonaise nose spray daily (it may take a few days or weeks before you start noticing a difference, and you *have* to take it daily)

    From what I've read, bathing cats doesn't help unless you bathe them daily. But they make wet wipes specifically for cats that you can try if you're dedicated - just like bathing, you'd have to give a "wipe bath" once daily for it to have any affect on the dander.

  • tinwhiskerstinwhiskers Registered User regular
    With Claritin (Loratadine) at least, the dosage instructions for it are somewhat suspect. Basically the dosage for it is set at 10mg, because above 10mg it is no longer 'non-drowsy', but if 10 mg is enough to do any good is suspect.

    I know when my seasonal allergies kick in I take Zertec (Cetirizine), at two or three times the single 10mg pill a day dose to have any effect on my allergies. IANAD, but it hasn't killed me but your mileage may vary.


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  • BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
    Bliss 101 wrote: »
    You could also look into allergy shots. This is a type of immunotherapy where you're injected with the allergen in increasingly high doses over several months, then with a maintenance dose a few times a year for 3 - 5 years. The idea is to build tolerance so that your body no longer reacts as strongly to the relatively minor allergen doses in the environment. Symptoms should be greatly reduced within the first year and the results can last a lifetime. It does take some time and commitment though, and I have no idea how much it costs.

    Thanks, we researched those but they are expensive where I live and I wouldn't trust the practitioners here with them anyways as they are noobs to them.
    Cambiata wrote: »
    I'm allergic to cats but I have three cats. The only thing that's ever helped for my allergies is taking flonaise nose spray daily (it may take a few days or weeks before you start noticing a difference, and you *have* to take it daily)

    From what I've read, bathing cats doesn't help unless you bathe them daily. But they make wet wipes specifically for cats that you can try if you're dedicated - just like bathing, you'd have to give a "wipe bath" once daily for it to have any affect on the dander.

    Thanks, she is flying to Toronto at the moment (cabin chief) so I hope they have the flonase spray in Canada as well. Is it prescription only or OTC?
    With Claritin (Loratadine) at least, the dosage instructions for it are somewhat suspect. Basically the dosage for it is set at 10mg, because above 10mg it is no longer 'non-drowsy', but if 10 mg is enough to do any good is suspect.

    I know when my seasonal allergies kick in I take Zertec (Cetirizine), at two or three times the single 10mg pill a day dose to have any effect on my allergies. IANAD, but it hasn't killed me but your mileage may vary.

    Yeah, she has to take 2 or 3 of those for it to have any effect on her. I think the standard dose is for people with minor allergies :)

    Thank you all for the help.

    i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    I'm extremely allergic to cats, and for some people there's just no solution. Your best outcome is a permanent, groggy headcold. Good luck trying all the options, but sometimes allergies are allergies and it's just not something you can fix.

    What is this I don't even.
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  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    Basar wrote: »
    Thanks, she is flying to Toronto at the moment (cabin chief) so I hope they have the flonase spray in Canada as well. Is it prescription only or OTC?

    I get mine prescription but I've seen it over the counter. I don't know if there's any difference.

  • NobodyNobody Registered User regular
    Cambiata wrote: »
    Basar wrote: »
    Thanks, she is flying to Toronto at the moment (cabin chief) so I hope they have the flonase spray in Canada as well. Is it prescription only or OTC?

    I get mine prescription but I've seen it over the counter. I don't know if there's any difference.

    Personally I use Flonase and I switched to the OTC version wih no difference, it's cheaper than the copay.

    ElvenshaeBasar
  • DrFrylockDrFrylock Registered User regular
    If it is any consolation I grew up with a terrible cat allergy and then married a very nice woman with cats. After living with them for a couple years and using Claritin every day I became unallergic to them. I don't know how common this is but long-term low-level exposure worked for me!

    Pheezer wrote: »
    I would strongly recommend reading DrFrylock's post thoroughly and considering all of his points individually.
    Daenris
  • Space PickleSpace Pickle Registered User regular
    Basar wrote: »
    Seeing a doctor to try out different allergy medications should also probably be on that list. There are at least a couple different major kinds and one might work out better for her than over the counter stuff.

    She's been to several doctors about it but their first recommendation is always "get rid of it". Then they all prescribe the same 3 or 4 antihistamines. I think doctors here (Istanbul, Turkey) just don't know jack about allergies.

    Getting rid of the cat is the only solution. Over the counter medications aren't meant to be taken indefinitely, and she isn't able to get the shot then *shrug*.

    Keeping the house clean will help a little.

  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    Long term antihistamine use is associated with weight gain, and Flonase is fluticasone, a steroid, which thins out the skin of your nose and can make you susceptible to nosebleeds. Decongestants like pseudoephedrine cause hypertension over the long term and can cause dependence and rebound congestion when stopped.

    Thone are the most common side effects of the most common allergy medications. Claritin is pseudoephedrine and loratidine, a decongestant and an antihistamine.

    You will have limited success controlling cat allergens in your home. You should prioritize your sleeping quarters, as sleeping with rhinitis is horrible. Consider air filters, closed ventilation, frequent room cleaning, and not letting the cat into certain rooms.

    Allergy shots can desensitize, but they're not guaranteed and can be expensive and require many visits. It's preferable to long term use of allergy medication.

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  • Blameless ClericBlameless Cleric An angel made of sapphires each more flawlessly cut than the last Registered User regular
    edited September 2016
    Hello!!

    I grew up with cats all my life and never had a problem, then went to college for 4 months, came back for Christmas and was suddenly unable to breathe

    what my parents have done to enable me to visit them without having an asthma attack twice a day is to get a hepa filter air filter thing and run it in the room I stay in all year round, and COMPLETELY block the cats from entering. Before I come visit, they vacuum the couches, rugs and floors, wash all the bedding in my room and dust everything in there too

    I also took an albuterol inhaler every 4-6 hours when I was home, and would go on Montelukast (generic of Singulair - prescription and gives me HORRIBLE nightmares unfortunately) starting a week before visiting, on top of taking either Zyrtec or Alegra + non-drowsy sudafed and a couple of ibuprofen every day. That made it...... barely tolerable, at first, but, now that my parents have been being really diligent about the cat-hair in the house year-round for a while, it's helped a LOT

    now I can come home and even pet the cats some, be a little stuffy but basically no problem (still on the Montelukast), rarely need my inhaler and the occasional benadryl for eye/skin itchiness.

    Oh one of the other things we do is turn off any fans that are on in a room I am in. If there's a fan, it stirs stuff up no matter how well they've vacuumed and it's terrible.

    It can also be really cat-specific .. I am definitely allergic to my two beloved cats that I grew up with, and a couple of cats that friends have, but I spent a month living with a cat at my boyfriend's place and barely had any problems at all even without any of the medication


    so, yeah, my solution when being with cats has been to throw every medication under the sun at it and be extremely fastidious with house cleaning

    Blameless Cleric on
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  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    Of all these drugs, I would limit the long term use of decongestants such as Sudafed, Claritin, Afrin, and anything that ends with -rine to less than a week.

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    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
  • tinwhiskerstinwhiskers Registered User regular
    Claritin only has decongestants if you are getting Claritin-D. Standard Claritin is just loratidine

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  • CreaganCreagan Registered User regular
    Flonase, and other OTC nasal spray anti-histamines can be really helpful. I have chronically swollen sinuses to the point where I can't smell and those drugs were literally the only thing that let me breath through my nose. But I had to stop taking them because they made me gain weight like crazy. (I am apparently unusual though, so maybe your wife will see better results.)

    Also, allergy shots can be super helpful if your allergy isn't that bad. But if it's a hugely intense reaction, be careful. My mom had to stop taking allergy shots because her arms swelled up so much (and didn't recover for so long) that the doctor was afraid she was getting nerve damage.

  • mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    DrFrylock wrote: »
    If it is any consolation I grew up with a terrible cat allergy and then married a very nice woman with cats. After living with them for a couple years and using Claritin every day I became unallergic to them. I don't know how common this is but long-term low-level exposure worked for me!

    no it happens. it happens way faster with kittens than older cats but it does. your body down regulates the response to a certain degree with constant exposure

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  • BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
    Nobody wrote: »
    Cambiata wrote: »
    Basar wrote: »
    Thanks, she is flying to Toronto at the moment (cabin chief) so I hope they have the flonase spray in Canada as well. Is it prescription only or OTC?

    I get mine prescription but I've seen it over the counter. I don't know if there's any difference.

    Personally I use Flonase and I switched to the OTC version wih no difference, it's cheaper than the copay.

    Thank you both.
    DrFrylock wrote: »
    If it is any consolation I grew up with a terrible cat allergy and then married a very nice woman with cats. After living with them for a couple years and using Claritin every day I became unallergic to them. I don't know how common this is but long-term low-level exposure worked for me!

    This is what I have been telling her, "you'll get used to it"... she hasn't so far but I am keeping my fingers crossed :) Thanks.
    Paladin wrote: »

    You will have limited success controlling cat allergens in your home. You should prioritize your sleeping quarters, as sleeping with rhinitis is horrible. Consider air filters, closed ventilation, frequent room cleaning, and not letting the cat into certain rooms.

    We are definitely working on this. Bedrooms is off limits. We are removing carpeting. Getting a HEPA vacuum, and air filter. Thanks.
    what my parents have done to enable me to visit them without having an asthma attack twice a day is to get a hepa filter air filter thing and run it in the room I stay in all year round, and COMPLETELY block the cats from entering. Before I come visit, they vacuum the couches, rugs and floors, wash all the bedding in my room and dust everything in there too

    Can you share the brand and model of the air filter your parents are running in your room? Thanks and happy to hear that you have figured out what works for you :)
    lenava12 wrote: »
    This is an interesting article on how to "Keep the pet, lose the allergies". It recommends wiping your pet down with a warm, damp wash cloth twice a week, which I imagine might be easier than fully bathing the cat? Purely going on how my own cats react to the sight of a tub of water

    I think someone has already mentioned there are purpose made wet wipes for this purpose alone? :) We'll definitely give this a try. Thanks.

    i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

  • AuralynxAuralynx Darkness is a perspective Watching the ego workRegistered User regular
    DrFrylock wrote: »
    If it is any consolation I grew up with a terrible cat allergy and then married a very nice woman with cats. After living with them for a couple years and using Claritin every day I became unallergic to them. I don't know how common this is but long-term low-level exposure worked for me!

    I'm not so much allergic to cats per se as prone to reacting to their dander in enclosed and badly-ventilated spaces if I'm in them for a while.

    Add me to the air filter / vacuum party, here.

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  • Inquisitor77Inquisitor77 2 x Penny Arcade Fight Club Champion A fixed point in space and timeRegistered User regular
    One thing that will help, which you want to be doing anyway, is brushing your cat daily. Just make it a ritual, maybe before you go to bed or something, and it doesn't take more than 5 minutes, especially for shorthairs. Doing so will get rid of a ton of loose hairs that would otherwise just end up floating around your house. It also cuts down on things like hairballs, and can give you a quick heads up when things like fleas show up.

    WiseManTobes
  • Space PickleSpace Pickle Registered User regular
    The allergy isn't to the cat's hair, it's to their dander. I doubt brushing the cat would do anything to alleviate the symptoms.

  • Inquisitor77Inquisitor77 2 x Penny Arcade Fight Club Champion A fixed point in space and timeRegistered User regular
    The allergy isn't to the cat's hair, it's to their dander. I doubt brushing the cat would do anything to alleviate the symptoms.

    You do realize that allergens can travel with hair, right? And in most cases the hair will be covered with the stuff? Particularly if you're talking about saliva proteins?

    Auralynx
  • Space PickleSpace Pickle Registered User regular
    The main culprit is dead skin that flakes off and floats around in the air, which is subsequently inhaled by the allergic person. The impact of grooming the cat is going to be negligible unless the allergic person is somehow inhaling cat hair as well.

  • Kayne Red RobeKayne Red Robe Master of Magic ArcanusRegistered User regular
    Get an air purifier for the bedroom and don't let the cat in there. Should help a fair amount as long as you regularly vacuum the other parts of the house (probably weekly).

  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    If he's medium to long hair, 1-2 haircuts a year will be noticable, my fluffball gets chopped down just for summertime, but he loves it, and it really cuts down on the shedding during that time.

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  • November FifthNovember Fifth Registered User regular
    Ingesting antihistamines or corticosteriods continuously just to tolerate a pet is a really bad idea, particularly if you are planning on having children.

    Are you really going to subject her to this for the next ten years of your lives? That's a lot of life lost to watery eyes and sneezing or a foggy head. Wife/SO > Cat.

    ElvenshaeDarkewolfedispatch.oIruka38thDoe
  • EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    Hello!!

    I grew up with cats all my life and never had a problem, then went to college for 4 months, came back for Christmas and was suddenly unable to breathe

    what my parents have done to enable me to visit them without having an asthma attack twice a day is to get a hepa filter air filter thing and run it in the room I stay in all year round, and COMPLETELY block the cats from entering. Before I come visit, they vacuum the couches, rugs and floors, wash all the bedding in my room and dust everything in there too

    I also took an albuterol inhaler every 4-6 hours when I was home, and would go on Montelukast (generic of Singulair - prescription and gives me HORRIBLE nightmares unfortunately) starting a week before visiting, on top of taking either Zyrtec or Alegra + non-drowsy sudafed and a couple of ibuprofen every day. That made it...... barely tolerable, at first, but, now that my parents have been being really diligent about the cat-hair in the house year-round for a while, it's helped a LOT

    now I can come home and even pet the cats some, be a little stuffy but basically no problem (still on the Montelukast), rarely need my inhaler and the occasional benadryl for eye/skin itchiness.

    Oh one of the other things we do is turn off any fans that are on in a room I am in. If there's a fan, it stirs stuff up no matter how well they've vacuumed and it's terrible.

    It can also be really cat-specific .. I am definitely allergic to my two beloved cats that I grew up with, and a couple of cats that friends have, but I spent a month living with a cat at my boyfriend's place and barely had any problems at all even without any of the medication


    so, yeah, my solution when being with cats has been to throw every medication under the sun at it and be extremely fastidious with house cleaning

    This is basically me. Owned a cat, no issues. A few years after I owned it I wound up having major issues when visiting a friend (who has cats).
    Turns out I gained a nice weakness to cats, but not in the "aweee" way.

    It's incredibly dependent upon the cat. Some I can pet, hold, even bury my face in their fur and inhale without a single issue, even without medication.

    Others I can't even be near for longer than a few moments, even if I am loaded up on allergy meds, before I need to step outside from nearly collapsing and trying to breathe. A few cases I would likely have had to go to the hospital if I hadn't left ASAP and happened to have an asthma inhaler nearby to use.

    I just don't risk it in general. The worst offenders there's nothing I can do. They just need to be nearby for a few minutes and everything goes to hell.
    The less bad ones can make it hard to breathe, leave me itchy with swollen eyes, and I tend to get sick shortly thereafter. Even when I make sure to load up on allergy meds.
    Cats like this can be gone for years and going into a house where they lived can still leave me uncomfortable.

    So basically... I'd suggest discussing just how bad this allergy is before leaving the "get rid of the cat" off the table. In my case if that was true, there are some cases where that would mean that I go in favor of the cat... there just would not be any other way it would work.

    ElvenshaeDarkewolfeBlameless Cleric
  • BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
    If he's medium to long hair, 1-2 haircuts a year will be noticable, my fluffball gets chopped down just for summertime, but he loves it, and it really cuts down on the shedding during that time.

    This I'll look into :) Thanks.

    i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

  • BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
    Ingesting antihistamines or corticosteriods continuously just to tolerate a pet is a really bad idea, particularly if you are planning on having children.

    Are you really going to subject her to this for the next ten years of your lives? That's a lot of life lost to watery eyes and sneezing or a foggy head. Wife/SO > Cat.

    She doesn't plan on using them continuously, only during seasonal changes like in May or September. We are hoping that air purifier + no carpeting + 1 or 2 trimming of the hair per year + regular cleaning of the house will help a lot. Thanks for your warning :)

    i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

  • Blameless ClericBlameless Cleric An angel made of sapphires each more flawlessly cut than the last Registered User regular
    Basar wrote: »
    Nobody wrote: »
    Cambiata wrote: »
    Basar wrote: »
    Thanks, she is flying to Toronto at the moment (cabin chief) so I hope they have the flonase spray in Canada as well. Is it prescription only or OTC?

    I get mine prescription but I've seen it over the counter. I don't know if there's any difference.

    Personally I use Flonase and I switched to the OTC version wih no difference, it's cheaper than the copay.

    Thank you both.
    DrFrylock wrote: »
    If it is any consolation I grew up with a terrible cat allergy and then married a very nice woman with cats. After living with them for a couple years and using Claritin every day I became unallergic to them. I don't know how common this is but long-term low-level exposure worked for me!

    This is what I have been telling her, "you'll get used to it"... she hasn't so far but I am keeping my fingers crossed :) Thanks.
    Paladin wrote: »

    You will have limited success controlling cat allergens in your home. You should prioritize your sleeping quarters, as sleeping with rhinitis is horrible. Consider air filters, closed ventilation, frequent room cleaning, and not letting the cat into certain rooms.

    We are definitely working on this. Bedrooms is off limits. We are removing carpeting. Getting a HEPA vacuum, and air filter. Thanks.
    what my parents have done to enable me to visit them without having an asthma attack twice a day is to get a hepa filter air filter thing and run it in the room I stay in all year round, and COMPLETELY block the cats from entering. Before I come visit, they vacuum the couches, rugs and floors, wash all the bedding in my room and dust everything in there too

    Can you share the brand and model of the air filter your parents are running in your room? Thanks and happy to hear that you have figured out what works for you :)
    lenava12 wrote: »
    This is an interesting article on how to "Keep the pet, lose the allergies". It recommends wiping your pet down with a warm, damp wash cloth twice a week, which I imagine might be easier than fully bathing the cat? Purely going on how my own cats react to the sight of a tub of water

    I think someone has already mentioned there are purpose made wet wipes for this purpose alone? :) We'll definitely give this a try. Thanks.

    I have no idea but I can ask them!!

    @spool32 what is the air filter in my room !!

    Orphane wrote: »

    one flower ring to rule them all and in the sunlightness bind them

    I'd love it if you took a look at my art and my PATREON!
  • spool32spool32 Contrary Library Registered User regular
    Basar wrote: »
    Nobody wrote: »
    Cambiata wrote: »
    Basar wrote: »
    Thanks, she is flying to Toronto at the moment (cabin chief) so I hope they have the flonase spray in Canada as well. Is it prescription only or OTC?

    I get mine prescription but I've seen it over the counter. I don't know if there's any difference.

    Personally I use Flonase and I switched to the OTC version wih no difference, it's cheaper than the copay.

    Thank you both.
    DrFrylock wrote: »
    If it is any consolation I grew up with a terrible cat allergy and then married a very nice woman with cats. After living with them for a couple years and using Claritin every day I became unallergic to them. I don't know how common this is but long-term low-level exposure worked for me!

    This is what I have been telling her, "you'll get used to it"... she hasn't so far but I am keeping my fingers crossed :) Thanks.
    Paladin wrote: »

    You will have limited success controlling cat allergens in your home. You should prioritize your sleeping quarters, as sleeping with rhinitis is horrible. Consider air filters, closed ventilation, frequent room cleaning, and not letting the cat into certain rooms.

    We are definitely working on this. Bedrooms is off limits. We are removing carpeting. Getting a HEPA vacuum, and air filter. Thanks.
    what my parents have done to enable me to visit them without having an asthma attack twice a day is to get a hepa filter air filter thing and run it in the room I stay in all year round, and COMPLETELY block the cats from entering. Before I come visit, they vacuum the couches, rugs and floors, wash all the bedding in my room and dust everything in there too

    Can you share the brand and model of the air filter your parents are running in your room? Thanks and happy to hear that you have figured out what works for you :)
    lenava12 wrote: »
    This is an interesting article on how to "Keep the pet, lose the allergies". It recommends wiping your pet down with a warm, damp wash cloth twice a week, which I imagine might be easier than fully bathing the cat? Purely going on how my own cats react to the sight of a tub of water

    I think someone has already mentioned there are purpose made wet wipes for this purpose alone? :) We'll definitely give this a try. Thanks.

    I have no idea but I can ask them!!

    @spool32 what is the air filter in my room !!

    Some sort of Honeywell

  • BasarBasar IstanbulRegistered User regular
    spool32 wrote: »
    Basar wrote: »
    Nobody wrote: »
    Cambiata wrote: »
    Basar wrote: »
    Thanks, she is flying to Toronto at the moment (cabin chief) so I hope they have the flonase spray in Canada as well. Is it prescription only or OTC?

    I get mine prescription but I've seen it over the counter. I don't know if there's any difference.

    Personally I use Flonase and I switched to the OTC version wih no difference, it's cheaper than the copay.

    Thank you both.
    DrFrylock wrote: »
    If it is any consolation I grew up with a terrible cat allergy and then married a very nice woman with cats. After living with them for a couple years and using Claritin every day I became unallergic to them. I don't know how common this is but long-term low-level exposure worked for me!

    This is what I have been telling her, "you'll get used to it"... she hasn't so far but I am keeping my fingers crossed :) Thanks.
    Paladin wrote: »

    You will have limited success controlling cat allergens in your home. You should prioritize your sleeping quarters, as sleeping with rhinitis is horrible. Consider air filters, closed ventilation, frequent room cleaning, and not letting the cat into certain rooms.

    We are definitely working on this. Bedrooms is off limits. We are removing carpeting. Getting a HEPA vacuum, and air filter. Thanks.
    what my parents have done to enable me to visit them without having an asthma attack twice a day is to get a hepa filter air filter thing and run it in the room I stay in all year round, and COMPLETELY block the cats from entering. Before I come visit, they vacuum the couches, rugs and floors, wash all the bedding in my room and dust everything in there too

    Can you share the brand and model of the air filter your parents are running in your room? Thanks and happy to hear that you have figured out what works for you :)
    lenava12 wrote: »
    This is an interesting article on how to "Keep the pet, lose the allergies". It recommends wiping your pet down with a warm, damp wash cloth twice a week, which I imagine might be easier than fully bathing the cat? Purely going on how my own cats react to the sight of a tub of water

    I think someone has already mentioned there are purpose made wet wipes for this purpose alone? :) We'll definitely give this a try. Thanks.

    I have no idea but I can ask them!!

    @spool32 what is the air filter in my room !!

    Some sort of Honeywell

    Thanks, Honeywell seems to be popular among pet owners

    i live in a country with a batshit crazy president and no, english is not my first language

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