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Computer Upgrades

zunkzunk Registered User regular
edited May 2007 in Games and Technology
Hello guys, I'm in need of some computer tech help

Im looking for a motherboard that supports Intel Duo 2 Core Processors. I was going to overclock one of their low segment CPU's E4300. Thing is, I don't want to buy some top of the line, overpriced RAM to overclock it with, therefor I was looking for a cheap low-range motherboard that supports 'this' specific technology

With 'this' technology you can overclock 'without restrictions', but the fsb on the memory stays the same. Meaning you don't need top of the line, overpriced memory. I was told the Gigabyte 965 DS3 supports this kind of tech. Do you know of more motherbards that are compatible, and which ones that are the cheapest among the bunch?


By the way, this is what I am considering to purchase

*Motherboard

*Intel E4300 Core 2 Duo, 1.8Ghz

*Asus Extreme GeForce 8600GT 256MB DDR3 TV-out HDTV DUAL DVI RETAIL PCI Express

*Corsair Value S. DDR2 1024MB PC2-5300 667MHz CL5 x 2



As you can see, nothing fancy. It is however quite a lot better than my current stuff.

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    DulathDulath Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    'this' overclocking 'without restrictions' cannot be done. Intel locks the CPU multiplier on all but their "Extreme" processors (X6800 for example). The only way to OC a processor such as the E4300 is by pumping up the FSB on the motherboard.

    Anyways, you shouldn't be so fearful of OCing the FSB. The Intel platform does not take a big as hit as AMD when running the RAM asynchronously. This is done by dividers. I have my E6300 running 24/7 at 2.8GHz over its stock 1.8. My Gigabyte DS3 motherboard with a stock FSB of 266 (before quad pumping) runs at 400MHz to achieve this.

    Also, with the RAM in your list, you would not be overclocking it if you ran it synchronously to a FSB of 333 (333 * 2 = ~ 667). That's an overclock of 77MHz on the FSB. Multiply that 77 by whatever the E4300's multiplier is (too lazy to look it up).

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    zunkzunk Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Ok. Maybe I wasn't clear enough. It's the fsb you overclock, BUT, the speed of the memory modules are unaffected by the increased fsb. They operate in the same speed no mather what fsb. I'm not sure what the technology behind this is called (maybe, 'memory clocked mode - linked/unlinked"). I have a review where they use, and recommend those motherboards to newbies: http://www.legionhardware.com/document.php?id=642


    EDIT: maybe just "asynchronous overclocking"

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    DulathDulath Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    zunk wrote: »
    Ok. Maybe I wasn't clear enough. It's the fsb you overclock, BUT, the speed of the memory modules are unaffected by the increased fsb. They operate in the same speed no mather what fsb. I'm not sure what the technology behind this is called (maybe, 'memory clocked mode - linked/unlinked"). I have a review where they use, and recommend those motherboards to newbies: http://www.legionhardware.com/document.php?id=642

    I did mention that briefly. It's called running the RAM and FSB asynchronously and it's accomplished by using "dividers." You set these in the BIOS. All but the most cheapest of motherboards will allow you to set this at will.

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    zunkzunk Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    Dulath wrote: »
    zunk wrote: »
    Ok. Maybe I wasn't clear enough. It's the fsb you overclock, BUT, the speed of the memory modules are unaffected by the increased fsb. They operate in the same speed no mather what fsb. I'm not sure what the technology behind this is called (maybe, 'memory clocked mode - linked/unlinked"). I have a review where they use, and recommend those motherboards to newbies: http://www.legionhardware.com/document.php?id=642

    I did mention that briefly. It's called running the RAM and FSB asynchronously and it's accomplished by using "dividers." You set these in the BIOS. All but the most cheapest of motherboards will allow you to set this at will.

    I see. When I answered you probably where on your way and adding that to your post (edit edit). Well, ok. Good to have a name for it. Is that technology chipset dependant? If yes, what chipsets? If no. Which motherboard are the cheapest?

    zunk on
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    DulathDulath Registered User regular
    edited May 2007
    zunk wrote: »
    Dulath wrote: »
    zunk wrote: »
    Ok. Maybe I wasn't clear enough. It's the fsb you overclock, BUT, the speed of the memory modules are unaffected by the increased fsb. They operate in the same speed no mather what fsb. I'm not sure what the technology behind this is called (maybe, 'memory clocked mode - linked/unlinked"). I have a review where they use, and recommend those motherboards to newbies: http://www.legionhardware.com/document.php?id=642

    I did mention that briefly. It's called running the RAM and FSB asynchronously and it's accomplished by using "dividers." You set these in the BIOS. All but the most cheapest of motherboards will allow you to set this at will.

    I see. When I answered you probably where on your way and adding that to your post (edit edit). Well, ok. Good to have a name for it. Is that technology chipset dependant? If yes, what chipsets? If no. Which motherboard are the cheapest?

    Memory ratio/dividers is really old hat, from the SD-RAM days and earlier. I'd be impossible to walk out of a store with a motherboard designed for C2D that did not have memory dividers. Feel free to be as cheap as you want on the motherboard, but as with most things, you get what you pay for.

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