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Helping You Build A Better [Home Network]

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  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Apologies for Necro'ing this thread, but I thought it might be the most appropriate place to ask this - My girlfriend is in the process of moving in with me, and has a number of "smart home" things she's very fond of. Specifically, a Ring doorbell, a number of Alexa devices, and lots of smart lightbulbs. While I can't deny the convenience of them all, I still have reservations about the security of it.

    Some questions/thoughts:
    1. If I simply put these things on a guest network (so they can see my internal devices, i.e. PC/PS5/etc), is that sufficient security?
    2. Are any brands better than others at security?
    3. Best practices for securing them?

    And any other feedback on them would be welcome!

    So, when I set up my Christmas lights, I put the smart plugs on the guest network for the time they're going, to reduce the access that they have to the overall network. Most of my other smart devices are connected to the main network, mainly because they are a) either within the house or b) are in protected enclosures outside.

    As for brands, I tend to stick with ones with significant presence, and stay away from ones that I've heard little about.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    BullheadShadowfire
  • VoodooVVoodooV Registered User regular
    Installed the recent update for PiHole the other day. now there is this new alerting system for PiHole issues and it was going crazy right after the update with messages like this:

    "dnsmasq-dhcp[464]: not giving name localhost to the DHCP lease of 192.168.1.XX because the name exists in /etc/hosts with address 127.0.0.1" (this is not the precise message since I've resolved the issue so I copied this from a forum describing the issue)

    after some google searching, apparently this is an old issue going back as early as 2015 where samsung devices give themselves a hostname of localhost which is generally reserved for loopback and it was making pihole angry, but never really knew about it till this update brought it to my attention more visibly.

    Samsung has apparently ignored this issue and the workaround is to go into pihole or whatever is acting as your DHCP server and set up a static DHCP assignment where you can give it a different DNS name.

  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Just upgraded my wireless router to something that supports Wi-Fi 6. I see on the 2.4ghz band there are options for beamforming, OFDMA and MU-MIMO but they are all disabled by default. Any reason I shouldn't turn those on? My only real concern would be I have a lot of IoT devices on that band that are from the 802.11g days, don't want to cause connectivity issues for those.

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    If they're already connecting now that you're running 802.11ax, the options you listed shouldn't cause connection issues. The only one I see maybe causing problems is OFDMA, but give the other two a shot for sure. Beamforming in particular is a pretty nice boost for a lot of devices.

    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
    AbsoluteZero
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited May 5
    Nevermind, duh.

    Just needed to type it out apparently. Eero would control 2.4 and 5Ghz.

    MichaelLC on
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    Got another network question. My home network is managed through a router. I also have an unmanaged switch with multiple devices attached to it, and the switch is attached to the router.

    How does data flow between devices attached to the switch in this scenario? Let's say I am streaming a movie from a NAS to a TV and they are both connected to the switch. Does the data only flow through the switch? Or does it go all the way out through the router and back?

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    edited May 9
    Got another network question. My home network is managed through a router. I also have an unmanaged switch with multiple devices attached to it, and the switch is attached to the router.

    How does data flow between devices attached to the switch in this scenario? Let's say I am streaming a movie from a NAS to a TV and they are both connected to the switch. Does the data only flow through the switch? Or does it go all the way out through the router and back?

    It would only go to the switch, because the packets would point specifically to the MAC and IP addresses for the devices, and the switch is smart enough to make sure that the packets go to the right device.

    In general, TCP/IP networks work by having nodes like your switch try to figure out if an incoming packet can be handled at their level or needs to be sent upstream to be handled by devices up the chain. These networks use a hub and spoke topology, which is why plugging a switch into itself (and this happens more often than you think) will bring a network to its knees.

    AngelHedgie on
    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    AbsoluteZero
  • HydropoloHydropolo Registered User regular
    To give a bit more detail, it's going to depend on a number of factors.

    1) Subnet mask. If your devices are on the same subnet, they are going to handle everything through the switch using MAC addresses after looking up the MAC that your PC's IP is at. If they in different subnets, they would forward via the switch to your router.... POSSIBLY out further if your network is really screwy.
    2) VLANs: You are incredibly unlikely to have these with an unmanaged switch (But I've seen sillier). These are technically not a routing/etc domain, but can force traffic up to a/the router. Generally speaking, you CAN do the same subnet split over vlans, but... it's a bad idea. Generally speaking you will be using big boy hardware before you get to that point and have a very specific reason.

    AbsoluteZero
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    Given that CloudFlare has shown that they choose to defend transphobia and hate, I have updated my post on setting up cloudflared to note that I no longer recommend this.

    Instead, my recommendation is to set up your own recursive DNS lookup server using unbound - the Pi-Hole folks have an excellent guide on getting unbound up and running on your Pi-Hole.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    BullheadShadowfireCalicaDisruptedCapitalistAbsoluteZero
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