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Wood Butcher block cutting board

RightfulSinRightfulSin Registered User regular
So I am thinking of acquiring a nice butcher block cutting board for home use. My question to you is: buy one or build one? I ask because I have an uncle who I am thinking of asking if I can requesition to co tract him to build one.

In terms of wood, what would be a good type to go for? I know I probably want a cross section pressed version as opposed to a parallel layout.

"If nothing is impossible, than would it not be impossible to find something that you could not do?" - Me

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    GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    If you're not doing end grain then the tool requirements are more 'normal', I'd recommend non-porous woods; good choices in NA are maple, walnut, and cherry. White oak would be ok but avoid woods like red oak or ash. Make sure you use a good water proof wood glue and don't run it through the dishwasher.

    Not sure what you are describing with the layout but look on Etsy or Fine Woodworking for some ideas and either you or your uncle should be able to make it easily unless you pick out some intricate pattern that involves running back and forth from the bandsaw to the router repeatedly. You can do just stripes of contrasting woods with just handtools in an afternoon.

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    RightfulSinRightfulSin Registered User regular
    The layout I was meaning was like cutting 2x2x2 blocks and making the board out of those, rather than 2x2x12 and laying 10 boards next to each other.

    "If nothing is impossible, than would it not be impossible to find something that you could not do?" - Me
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    GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    An end grain board like that will require a planer, jointer, table saw, and drum sander so a little more equipment. Be sure to read up on how to put it together, it'll be harder to correct anything than edge or face grain.

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    spool32spool32 Contrary Library Registered User regular
    You're going to need more than just wood glue as well - if you want to put food on it or use a sharp knife on it, you're going to need to get some kind of food grade finish and do several, like maybe as many as 10-12, coats to seal it. You'll need to reapply after a few handwashes as well.

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    GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    My favorite way to finish cutting boards is to apply USP grade mineral oil (from the pharmacy dept at your grocer, sold as a laxative) repeatedly until no more will soak in. Then apply blended beeswax/mineral oil and refresh the latter whenever the wood starts to look dry. I wouldn't recommend any hard film forming finish since you'll be using knives on it.

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    spool32spool32 Contrary Library Registered User regular
    edited July 2022
    The mineral oil process works really well, just expect it to take as much as a few days to start. Then it's super easy to keep up.

    spool32 on
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    MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    This is one of those classic "time versus convenience" issues, like all woodworking really.

    Your uncle likely would love to make one with you and there's approximately one billion instructional videos out there on how to do it.

    Check your local lumberyard for scraps too. Try not to have a stroke when you see how expensive actual boards are

    I am in the business of saving lives.
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