Options

as if you needed a reason to buy a Wii..

darleysamdarleysam On my way toUKRegistered User regular
edited June 2007 in Games and Technology
STAR WIIS!

(i'm so sorry.. first Wii pun for me?)

http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=14500
In response to a question from session moderator N'Gai Croal of Newsweek asking: "What would it take to make a lightsaber game for the Wii?", Ward, who is President of LucasArts and a Senior VP at Lucasfilm, commented:

"We’re all over that, and internally we have already played a lightsaber game on the Wii. It’s a lot of fun, and we’ll get there."

He added that the whole concept of a title using a lightsaber of Nintendo Wii was "...in place! There’ll be some stuff out this Fall - it’s going to be a lot of fun."

It's unclear whether Ward could have been referring to the TT Games-developed Lego Star Wars: The Complete Saga, which will debut later this year on multiple formats including the Wii, or whether the company is planning further, as yet unannounced Wii-specific Star Wars games.

(The product page for The Complete Saga notes of the Wii SKU: "Motion-sensitive inputs give you exciting new ways to control your Lego Star Wars characters.")

The publisher is likely to reveal more information on its upcoming titles at the E3 Media Summit in Los Angeles early next month - Gamasutra will have the full write-up from the Jim Ward (LucasArts) and Neil Young (Electronic Arts) panel at Hollywood and Games in the near future.

it's not an officially announced title, but LucsArts apparently do have a working prototype of some lightsaber action, running on a Wii.

Go nuts.

forumsig.png
darleysam on
«1

Posts

  • Options
    urahonkyurahonky Resident FF7R hater Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    *splooge*

    urahonky on
  • Options
    existexist Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    darleysam wrote: »
    STAR WIIS!

    (i'm so sorry.. first Wii pun for me?)

    you are a terrible person

    the pun is bad and you should feel bad

    exist on
    UmPiq.png
  • Options
    KarennaKarenna Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    I mean, it's the most logical game to make for the Wii...

    I only hope that we get more than a Lego SW game...I think many of us want a REAL Lightsaber fighting game. I mean, come ON...who doesn't?!

    Karenna on
    389eb5ab62e67d83.png
  • Options
    dopplexdopplex Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Yeah, not even Lucasarts is stupid enough to miss this particular blindingly obvious opportunity to print money.

    dopplex on
  • Options
    Fartacus_the_MightyFartacus_the_Mighty Brought to you by the letter A.Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    It'll be Jedi Knight + waggle unless they get 1:1 control in there. It would be totally worth it even it if they had to charge $60 and include a special wiimote sensor attachment so the game could tell where the controller was regardless of orientation.

    Fartacus_the_Mighty on
  • Options
    HtownHtown Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Seriously, 1:1 control would not be as fun as everyone thinks it would be.

    Htown on
    steam_sig.png
  • Options
    SaddlerSaddler Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    It'll be Jedi Knight + waggle unless they get 1:1 control in there. It would be totally worth it even it if they had to charge $60 and include a special wiimote sensor attachment so the game could tell where the controller was regardless of orientation.


    Absolutely. It's gotta control like the baseball bat in Wii Sports, and heads will roll if they are big enough cockteases to do it any other way.

    I'd be up for an included attachment, but if that one was possible it seems like it would have been included in the Wii remote in the first place.

    Saddler on
  • Options
    suadeosuadeo Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Htown wrote: »
    Seriously, 1:1 control would not be as fun as everyone thinks it would be.

    I completely agree. I hope it is like jedi knight for controls. Depending on the way you swipe your controller will depend on how your char swings. This way it won't have to be 1:1 and still make it seem like you have more control.

    suadeo on
    Valseki.png
    My 360 is [strike]back[/strike] [strike]bricked[/strike] back! :D
  • Options
    DoronronDoronron Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Waggling the wiimote for the lightsaber, waggling the nunchuk for force powers (nunchuck buttons select tp/tk waggle), Wiimote A/B for aiming and shooting blasters, nunchuk thumbstick for moving the character.

    ...

    Maybe?

    Doronron on
  • Options
    Capt HowdyCapt Howdy Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    This gets the O face: Oh, Oh, OH.... OOOOOOOOOOHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!

    :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

    :?:

    OOOOOOOOOOOHHHHHHHHHHH Shiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitt! :lol:



    :zzz:

    Capt Howdy on
    Steam: kaylesolo1
    3DS: 1521-4165-5907
    PS3: KayleSolo
    Live: Kayle Solo
    WiiU: KayleSolo
  • Options
    Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Htown wrote: »
    Seriously, 1:1 control would not be as fun as everyone thinks it would be.

    why would you say that

    first of all, it would be pretty fun

    second of all just the idea of it being 1:1 control would make it an instant success even if it wasn't as fun as everyone thought

    Evil Multifarious on
  • Options
    mntorankusumntorankusu I'm not sure how to use this thing.... Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    1:1, or close to it (1:1 in full 3D isn't actually possible, I don't think, but it'd be reasonably easy to detect the rotation of the remote and make a character hold it in a way that matches), would be fun.

    Just because it would be more like using a real sword does not mean you would have to learn to properly hold or swing a sword. This is a dumb argument.

    If the game, for example, detected the direction of your swing and made the guy on screen (or pair of hands on screen, or whatever) do a similar motion, then there is no difference in the difficulty between this and "1:1" control. You still have to swing it sideways, and you don't have to really swing in either case. The only difference is that the character's motion more closely matches yours.

    Edit: There's also potential for less waggle lag (waggle laggle? laggle?) when the sword moves with you in real time. If it tries to detect a swing like proposed, then it has to wait until you do something it considers a swing for it to register, and then the character will do it. If it follows your movements in a "1:1" way, then it could have effect immediately. Especially with lightsabers, where you don't actually need any force (har har) to hurt whatever you're touching.

    mntorankusu on
  • Options
    jimenexjimenex Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Htown wrote: »
    Seriously, 1:1 control would not be as fun as everyone thinks it would be.

    It is....

    Has any of you gone to Disney Quest in Orlando? Thay have some virtual reality lightsaber game with 1:1 controls in which you block fireballs and fight some dude in the end. It IS fun.

    jimenex on
    bg.gif
  • Options
    ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Shadowfire on
    WiiU: Windrunner ; Guild Wars 2: Shadowfire.3940 ; PSN: Bradcopter
  • Options
    The_ScarabThe_Scarab Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Wiimote cant do perfect 1:1 though.

    Hence, Red Steel.

    The_Scarab on
  • Options
    LednehLedneh shinesquawk Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    I say that 1:1 wouldn't work for swords, simply because they'd hit shit and bounce off in the game but your arm wouldn't. Not to mention encountering plain old resistance in going through some dude's gut.

    Lightsabers, on the other hand, aren't under that restriction except in a few rare (and easily avoidable in game design) cases, so it just might work here. Guess we'll see.

    Ledneh on
  • Options
    darleysamdarleysam On my way to UKRegistered User regular
    edited June 2007
    see, i don't own a Wii, i'd like one, but i can't quite justify it yet. But having a well-made lightsaber game? Hell, i'll take two.

    darleysam on
    forumsig.png
  • Options
    Mojo_JojoMojo_Jojo We are only now beginning to understand the full power and ramifications of sexual intercourse Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    The_Scarab wrote: »
    Wiimote cant do perfect 1:1 though.

    Hence, Red Steel.
    No, it can't do good 1:1. A lightsaber game sounds all well and good but I'm not sure the Wii is up to it except in a "wave the remote around wildly to attack with your lightsaber and please don't complain that the character is just doing his own thing" way.

    Mojo_Jojo on
    Homogeneous distribution of your varieties of amuse-gueule
  • Options
    TetraNitroCubaneTetraNitroCubane The Djinnerator At the bottom of a bottleRegistered User regular
    edited June 2007
    This could be really, really good... Or really, really boring.

    I hope they use the wiimote for more than just 'waggle = button press'. As much as I love me some Twilight Princess, I was severely disappointed by the stunted swordplay mechanic. It doesn't have to be 1:1, but hopefully it will be more interesting than any movement correlating to the same result.

    TetraNitroCubane on
  • Options
    darleysamdarleysam On my way to UKRegistered User regular
    edited June 2007
    i wonder whether it'd be more 'on rails', than free-roaming as might be expected. That way they could restrict things more, and solve a lot of the problems with things like objects that you can't cut through and resistance and such.

    darleysam on
    forumsig.png
  • Options
    NickleNickle Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    I keep forgetting that the Wii can't do 1:1.

    It's probably all the videos and developer demonstrations I've seen that show me that it can. Thanks, for enlightening me.

    Nickle on
    Xbox/PSN/NNID/Steam: NickleDL | 3DS: 0731-4750-6906
  • Options
    tyrannustyrannus i am not fat Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    i haven't played an exceptionally good star wars game where this would've come in handy

    tyrannus on
  • Options
    yalborapyalborap Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    I keep forgetting that the Wii can't do 1:1.

    It's probably all the videos and developer demonstrations I've seen that show me that it can. Thanks, for enlightening me.

    The key issue lies in the sword fighting aspect. Yes, you can make the Wii do 1:1. You can make it do very good 1:1. However, the instant there is something stopping your in-game character's weapon, we run into a problem. Your arm keeps goin', their's doesn't, things get out of sync.

    yalborap on
  • Options
    ÆthelredÆthelred Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    I keep forgetting that the Wii can't do 1:1.

    It's probably all the videos and developer demonstrations I've seen that show me that it can. Thanks, for enlightening me.

    From all evidence so far, it can't get very close to 1:1 and any attempt has serious lag. Got a good video where it shows on screen the remote's exact position?

    Æthelred on
    pokes: 1505 8032 8399
  • Options
    the Togfatherthe Togfather Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Ledneh wrote: »
    I say that 1:1 wouldn't work for swords, simply because they'd hit shit and bounce off in the game but your arm wouldn't. Not to mention encountering plain old resistance in going through some dude's gut.

    Lightsabers, on the other hand, aren't under that restriction except in a few rare (and easily avoidable in game design) cases, so it just might work here. Guess we'll see.


    Ok, I'm not very familiar w/ what 1:1 means, but from what you're saying here I assume the 'restriction' you're talking about is any time that a lightsaber would meet some kind of resistance and not just slice right through something, right? So by that definition, then dueling someone else with a lightsaber would be out of the question? For me, personally, I wouldn't want a lightsaber sim game that did not involve me fighting other dudes with lightsabers. I mean, yah, they're pretty handy for blocking blaster bolts, slicing off limbs (of self or other), and gutting Taun-tauns, but true lightsaber artistry comes in head-to-head combat with a similarly equipped opponent.

    Or am I missing the point here?

    the Togfather on
    The night is dark and full of terrors.
    twit feed
  • Options
    mntorankusumntorankusu I'm not sure how to use this thing.... Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    I keep forgetting that the Wii can't do 1:1.

    It's probably all the videos and developer demonstrations I've seen that show me that it can. Thanks, for enlightening me.
    It can't do absolute, perfect 1:1 in 3D space, because the XYZ acceleration data is too inconsistent. The remote's exact rotation can be determined using the YPR data though, and along with the XYZ acceleration you could probably make something resembling 1:1, in a lightsaber game.

    The main problem here is that the game doesn't know if you're holding the sword with two hands or not. Plus it would rely heavily on holding the controller the right way, or the data could be misinterpreted.

    The sword-stopping issue doesn't come into play here until you meet another lightsaber user. And there are still methods of handling this. At worst, when the swords clash, they "slide" off of each other and make a sweet clash sound. Just like in the movies most of the time.

    mntorankusu on
  • Options
    tyrannustyrannus i am not fat Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    So, no light saber holds? Those are always fun.

    tyrannus on
  • Options
    j0hnz3rj0hnz3r Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Perfect 1:1 is silly if for no other reason than most people don't know how to swing a sword to hit anything with reasonable efficiency or form. Seriously, don't believe me? Go outside with a bunch of your friends and try to beat each other with sticks. I can pretty much guarantee that if you aren't trained in Wushu and have the whole thing choreographed, that you and your friends look like idiots beating each other with sticks.

    There's also the resistance issue and the fact that the Wii controller can't do perfect 1:1.

    There was an arcade game that used a fake katana in which you would ride on rails running around slicing people and dueling people. It was pretty fun. It also reminded me of Bushido Blade in first person mode, which was also ridiculously fun. I hope it's like those two.

    j0hnz3r on
    jedi_watchtower.png
  • Options
    NickleNickle Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    I keep forgetting that the Wii can't do 1:1.

    It's probably all the videos and developer demonstrations I've seen that show me that it can. Thanks, for enlightening me.
    It can't do absolute, perfect 1:1 in 3D space, because the XYZ acceleration data is too inconsistent. The remote's exact rotation can be determined using the YPR data though, and along with the XYZ acceleration you could probably make something resembling 1:1, in a lightsaber game.

    The main problem here is that the game doesn't know if you're holding the sword with two hands or not. Plus it would rely heavily on holding the controller the right way, or the data could be misinterpreted.

    The sword-stopping issue doesn't come into play here until you meet another lightsaber user. And there are still methods of handling this. At worst, when the swords clash, they "slide" off of each other and make a sweet clash sound. Just like in the movies most of the time.

    Well, I'm not claiming that the wiimote would stop in it's tracks when it hit something, but say, for instance that your sword got caught on something, couldn't they use your swing afterwards as kind of a measure of force (i.e. breaking through the block), maybe even make it an integral part of the game? Either way, I'm sure they could program it so that it would 'mark' where your wii remote was at at the time of the 'block', and resume control when your wiimote went back to that spot on the X or Y axis. I have seen demonstrations of the Wii reading 1:1, but it's not just 'lol, type in 'do what the remote does' easy. It will require programming tricks, but it can be done.

    To visualize it, you swing your sword horizontally (let's say, right to left), and it is blocked. As long as you keep the remote to the left, you'll apply pressure on the blocker, your sword will, effectively, try to 'swing through'. When you pull back, past the point of initial contact, the blade pulls back as well. It's entirely possible, if quite a task to program correctly.

    Please stop saying the remote can't do 1:1 controls, when there is a video, right here in this thread, showing it doing just that. If you want the wiimote to stop your arm when it hits something, though, I think you're asking for a bit too much. Oh, and if you want to use Red Steel as evidence that the remote can't do 1:1, then I'll use pong as evidence that games will never be anything more than two paddles and a ball.

    Nickle on
    Xbox/PSN/NNID/Steam: NickleDL | 3DS: 0731-4750-6906
  • Options
    MagisterialMagisterial Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    j0hnz3r wrote: »
    Perfect 1:1 is silly if for no other reason than most people don't know how to swing a sword to hit anything with reasonable efficiency or form.

    A game that forces me to build an interesting skill is more rewarding than one that doesn't. Making me learn to swing a sword with reasonable efficiency or form sounds a lot like making me learn to perform combos in fighting games. I've certainly sunk an enormous amount of time into the latter, and see no reason why I wouldn't enjoy learning the former.

    Magisterial on
  • Options
    Evil MultifariousEvil Multifarious Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    There's no need to have resistance or complete stoppage in a 1:1 sword game, especially since it would be impossible without some kind of force feedback controller. You can easily have your sword slide off the opponent's block, cut through their body, etc etc. If you did want to add bounces and resistance and such, simply have the sword bounce in the game and then quickly return to the position the player currently holds.

    It'd be especially easy to do 1:1 in a cartoony sword fighting game, where your attacks don't bounce off a block, but rather the blocker slides backward in a cloud of dust, anime-style.

    If the wiimote isn't precise enough to actually do 1:1 you can still approximate it, which is still lots of fun.

    Evil Multifarious on
  • Options
    the Togfatherthe Togfather Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    To visualize it, you swing your sword horizontally (let's say, right to left), and it is blocked. As long as you keep the remote to the left, you'll apply pressure on the blocker, your sword will, effectively, try to 'swing through'. When you pull back, past the point of initial contact, the blade pulls back as well. It's entirely possible, if quite a task to program correctly.

    Hmmm...I kind of like this. To expand on it a bit, I'm curious what the remote's vibration capability is? I imagine a lightsaber, when 'lit' has a bit of a vibration to it. So, say, when you activate your saber w/ the remote, it starts a slight, constant vibration. then, when you swing and hit an opposing lightsaber, you get a quick, more intense vibration, and then as your arm carries through past the point where your virtual saber made contact, the vibration stops altogether to indicate that you are no longer directly controlling your virtual saber. When you pull your arm back to the point of contact, the vibration resumes and you are now controlling your lightsaber again. The vibration would also increase at any point that you sliced through something, an enemie's neck, a blast door, your son's wrist, a strange old hermit who suddenly stopped defending himself for some odd reason, or whatever. Anyway, is the wii-mote capable of this?

    the Togfather on
    The night is dark and full of terrors.
    twit feed
  • Options
    mntorankusumntorankusu I'm not sure how to use this thing.... Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    Please stop saying the remote can't do 1:1 controls, when there is a video, right here in this thread, showing it doing just that. If you want the wiimote to stop your arm when it hits something, though, I think you're asking for a bit too much. Oh, and if you want to use Red Steel as evidence that the remote can't do 1:1, then I'll use pong as evidence that games will never be anything more than two paddles and a ball.
    Did you read what I said about the rotational data? In that video, the lightsaber's position never changes, it only rotates. I already said the rotation of the remote can be determined using the Yaw/Pitch/Roll data, and that's all they use in that video. That wouldn't be acceptable for a game where you swing a sword, though, and for three-dimensional movement, the sensors aren't accurate enough to keep track of the remote's exact position. Basically, they can be used to determine which direction the remote is moving, and for a good idea of how fast you're moving it.
    Nickle wrote: »
    Well, I'm not claiming that the wiimote would stop in it's tracks when it hit something, but say, for instance that your sword got caught on something, couldn't they use your swing afterwards as kind of a measure of force (i.e. breaking through the block), maybe even make it an integral part of the game? Either way, I'm sure they could program it so that it would 'mark' where your wii remote was at at the time of the 'block', and resume control when your wiimote went back to that spot on the X or Y axis. I have seen demonstrations of the Wii reading 1:1, but it's not just 'lol, type in 'do what the remote does' easy. It will require programming tricks, but it can be done.

    To visualize it, you swing your sword horizontally (let's say, right to left), and it is blocked. As long as you keep the remote to the left, you'll apply pressure on the blocker, your sword will, effectively, try to 'swing through'. When you pull back, past the point of initial contact, the blade pulls back as well. It's entirely possible, if quite a task to program correctly.
    This is the idea I had waaay back when people were first trying to claim sword fights weren't feasible. So, I agree with you here. Might not work as well in practice as it sounds, but it does sound like a solid idea to me.

    mntorankusu on
  • Options
    darleysamdarleysam On my way to UKRegistered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    Well, I'm not claiming that the wiimote would stop in it's tracks when it hit something, but say, for instance that your sword got caught on something, couldn't they use your swing afterwards as kind of a measure of force (i.e. breaking through the block), maybe even make it an integral part of the game? Either way, I'm sure they could program it so that it would 'mark' where your wii remote was at at the time of the 'block', and resume control when your wiimote went back to that spot on the X or Y axis. I have seen demonstrations of the Wii reading 1:1, but it's not just 'lol, type in 'do what the remote does' easy. It will require programming tricks, but it can be done.

    To visualize it, you swing your sword horizontally (let's say, right to left), and it is blocked. As long as you keep the remote to the left, you'll apply pressure on the blocker, your sword will, effectively, try to 'swing through'. When you pull back, past the point of initial contact, the blade pulls back as well. It's entirely possible, if quite a task to program correctly.
    This is the idea I had waaay back when people were first trying to claim sword fights weren't feasible. So, I agree with you here. Might not work as well in practice as it sounds, but it does sound like a solid idea to me.

    agreed. I don't know a great deal about what data the Wiimote takes and sends, but i do like the sound of this idea as a means of getting round the issue of your saber being blocked on-screen.

    darleysam on
    forumsig.png
  • Options
    NickleNickle Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    Please stop saying the remote can't do 1:1 controls, when there is a video, right here in this thread, showing it doing just that. If you want the wiimote to stop your arm when it hits something, though, I think you're asking for a bit too much. Oh, and if you want to use Red Steel as evidence that the remote can't do 1:1, then I'll use pong as evidence that games will never be anything more than two paddles and a ball.
    Did you read what I said about the rotational data? In that video, the lightsaber's position never changes, it only rotates. I already said the rotation of the remote can be determined using the Yaw/Pitch/Roll data, and that's all they use in that video. That wouldn't be acceptable for a game where you swing a sword, though, and for three-dimensional movement, the sensors aren't accurate enough to keep track of the remote's exact position. Basically, they can be used to determine which direction the remote is moving, and for a good idea of how fast you're moving it.

    But it is capable of reading the position of the remote, there are already several games that utilize this. I can't think of what one it is right now, but there's a minigame involving positioning the remote as it appears on the screen, and it's pretty precise. It's not as simple as asking the program 'where is the remote', but using the data you can obtain, it is possible to ascertain the exact position of the remote. It's all in the programming, but the capability is there. I was amazed, when playing excite truck, to note that the steering is recognized perfectly no matter how the remote is tilted forwards/backwards (accelerating/decelerating). That seems like a much more complicated trick than you would imagine.

    Nickle on
    Xbox/PSN/NNID/Steam: NickleDL | 3DS: 0731-4750-6906
  • Options
    mntorankusumntorankusu I'm not sure how to use this thing.... Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    darleysam wrote: »
    Nickle wrote: »
    Well, I'm not claiming that the wiimote would stop in it's tracks when it hit something, but say, for instance that your sword got caught on something, couldn't they use your swing afterwards as kind of a measure of force (i.e. breaking through the block), maybe even make it an integral part of the game? Either way, I'm sure they could program it so that it would 'mark' where your wii remote was at at the time of the 'block', and resume control when your wiimote went back to that spot on the X or Y axis. I have seen demonstrations of the Wii reading 1:1, but it's not just 'lol, type in 'do what the remote does' easy. It will require programming tricks, but it can be done.

    To visualize it, you swing your sword horizontally (let's say, right to left), and it is blocked. As long as you keep the remote to the left, you'll apply pressure on the blocker, your sword will, effectively, try to 'swing through'. When you pull back, past the point of initial contact, the blade pulls back as well. It's entirely possible, if quite a task to program correctly.
    This is the idea I had waaay back when people were first trying to claim sword fights weren't feasible. So, I agree with you here. Might not work as well in practice as it sounds, but it does sound like a solid idea to me.

    agreed. I don't know a great deal about what data the Wiimote takes and sends, but i do like the sound of this idea as a means of getting round the issue of your saber being blocked on-screen.
    I think a better way of managing the force applied is to have the initial force based off the speed of the impact, and then for as long as you hold it there, that force slowly decays (perhaps this could be based on stats of some sort, so if your "Strike Force" stat is lower than the enemy's, the longer you hold it, the more likely they are to push you away). Otherwise it might devolve into just moving your remote "all the way" in the direction you're pushing.

    mntorankusu on
  • Options
    mntorankusumntorankusu I'm not sure how to use this thing.... Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    Nickle wrote: »
    Please stop saying the remote can't do 1:1 controls, when there is a video, right here in this thread, showing it doing just that. If you want the wiimote to stop your arm when it hits something, though, I think you're asking for a bit too much. Oh, and if you want to use Red Steel as evidence that the remote can't do 1:1, then I'll use pong as evidence that games will never be anything more than two paddles and a ball.
    Did you read what I said about the rotational data? In that video, the lightsaber's position never changes, it only rotates. I already said the rotation of the remote can be determined using the Yaw/Pitch/Roll data, and that's all they use in that video. That wouldn't be acceptable for a game where you swing a sword, though, and for three-dimensional movement, the sensors aren't accurate enough to keep track of the remote's exact position. Basically, they can be used to determine which direction the remote is moving, and for a good idea of how fast you're moving it.

    But it is capable of reading the position of the remote, there are already several games that utilize this. I can't think of what one it is right now, but there's a minigame involving positioning the remote as it appears on the screen, and it's pretty precise. It's not as simple as asking the program 'where is the remote', but using the data you can obtain, it is possible to ascertain the exact position of the remote.
    No, it's not. The game you're referring to asks you to rotate it in the same way as the on-screen remote.

    mntorankusu on
  • Options
    NickleNickle Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    Nickle wrote: »
    Please stop saying the remote can't do 1:1 controls, when there is a video, right here in this thread, showing it doing just that. If you want the wiimote to stop your arm when it hits something, though, I think you're asking for a bit too much. Oh, and if you want to use Red Steel as evidence that the remote can't do 1:1, then I'll use pong as evidence that games will never be anything more than two paddles and a ball.
    Did you read what I said about the rotational data? In that video, the lightsaber's position never changes, it only rotates. I already said the rotation of the remote can be determined using the Yaw/Pitch/Roll data, and that's all they use in that video. That wouldn't be acceptable for a game where you swing a sword, though, and for three-dimensional movement, the sensors aren't accurate enough to keep track of the remote's exact position. Basically, they can be used to determine which direction the remote is moving, and for a good idea of how fast you're moving it.

    But it is capable of reading the position of the remote, there are already several games that utilize this. I can't think of what one it is right now, but there's a minigame involving positioning the remote as it appears on the screen, and it's pretty precise. It's not as simple as asking the program 'where is the remote', but using the data you can obtain, it is possible to ascertain the exact position of the remote.
    No, it's not. The game you're referring to asks you to rotate it in the same way as the on-screen remote.

    I thought of a better example: Marble Mania. The game knows when the remote is level, it's not working off of a user established starting point. in fact, the levels mirror the position of the remote perfectly.

    Nickle on
    Xbox/PSN/NNID/Steam: NickleDL | 3DS: 0731-4750-6906
  • Options
    urahonkyurahonky Resident FF7R hater Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    How many pages do you guys think this thread will reach if we continue the 1:1 arguments?

    urahonky on
  • Options
    mntorankusumntorankusu I'm not sure how to use this thing.... Registered User regular
    edited June 2007
    Nickle wrote: »
    Nickle wrote: »
    Nickle wrote: »
    Please stop saying the remote can't do 1:1 controls, when there is a video, right here in this thread, showing it doing just that. If you want the wiimote to stop your arm when it hits something, though, I think you're asking for a bit too much. Oh, and if you want to use Red Steel as evidence that the remote can't do 1:1, then I'll use pong as evidence that games will never be anything more than two paddles and a ball.
    Did you read what I said about the rotational data? In that video, the lightsaber's position never changes, it only rotates. I already said the rotation of the remote can be determined using the Yaw/Pitch/Roll data, and that's all they use in that video. That wouldn't be acceptable for a game where you swing a sword, though, and for three-dimensional movement, the sensors aren't accurate enough to keep track of the remote's exact position. Basically, they can be used to determine which direction the remote is moving, and for a good idea of how fast you're moving it.

    But it is capable of reading the position of the remote, there are already several games that utilize this. I can't think of what one it is right now, but there's a minigame involving positioning the remote as it appears on the screen, and it's pretty precise. It's not as simple as asking the program 'where is the remote', but using the data you can obtain, it is possible to ascertain the exact position of the remote.
    No, it's not. The game you're referring to asks you to rotate it in the same way as the on-screen remote.

    I thought of a better example: Marble Mania. The game knows when the remote is level, it's not working off of a user established starting point. in fact, the levels mirror the position of the remote perfectly.
    Again. Rotation. That data does not tell you where the remote is in space, it tells you how it's rotated.

    mntorankusu on
Sign In or Register to comment.