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Should I get my hair cut?

1ddqd1ddqd Registered User regular
edited September 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
Well, I usually get my hair cut every few months or so and it's time for a new one now. I usually get it cut short, slicked forward with spikes in front (generic guy hair). I'm *thinking* about doing something different, but I work in a semi-professional (khakis and button-up) environment, so I can't do anything *too* out of whack.

I'm also thinking about shaving my head, but I'm worried my head's shape is too big. Also, should have clarified, I go to Toni&Guy for all my needs (g/f cousin works there, mad discounts yo)Any ideas?

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    SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Go to a stylist. Not a barber, not a hobo, a stylist. Spend 40 bucks on a haircut by a pro, for a pro. Pay attention to what they are doing, learn what you can for your own use.

    After, you can switch up to a cheaper person who can follow the same cut (if you like it). I've found its worth the money, and for an office gig, a good cut says a lot about you.

    Sarcastro on
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    1ddqd1ddqd Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Oh, sorry, should have clarified, I go to Toni&Guy for all my needs (g/f cousin works there, mad discounts yo)

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    SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Ah. in that case, look through thier prints and see if you want to switch up to something. Ask thier advice, cuz they know things (or should) about head shape, drape, glasses, neckline, eye size, eyebrows, forehead, and all other kinds of facial features that will indicate what kind of cut looks good on you.

    Gut instinct: Head shaving is bad plan, unless its for cancer. Yay cancer!

    Sarcastro on
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    RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Sarcastro wrote: »
    Go to a stylist. Not a barber, not a hobo, a stylist. Spend 40 bucks on a haircut by a pro, for a pro. Pay attention to what they are doing, learn what you can for your own use.

    After, you can switch up to a cheaper person who can follow the same cut (if you like it). I've found its worth the money, and for an office gig, a good cut says a lot about you.

    What's wrong with a barber? In MA at least, the licensing requirements for a barber are much more stringent than for "stylists."

    RUNN1NGMAN on
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    Satanic JesusSatanic Jesus Hi, I'm Liam! with broken glassesRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Sarcastro wrote: »
    Ah. in that case, look through thier prints and see if you want to switch up to something. Ask thier advice, cuz they know things (or should) about head shape, drape, glasses, neckline, eye size, eyebrows, forehead, and all other kinds of facial features that will indicate what kind of cut looks good on you.

    Gut instinct: Head shaving is bad plan, unless its for cancer. Yay cancer!

    My brother shaves his head. Mainly because he started to lose his hair.

    Satanic Jesus on
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    SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »
    Sarcastro wrote: »
    Go to a stylist. Not a barber, not a hobo, a stylist. Spend 40 bucks on a haircut by a pro, for a pro. Pay attention to what they are doing, learn what you can for your own use.

    After, you can switch up to a cheaper person who can follow the same cut (if you like it). I've found its worth the money, and for an office gig, a good cut says a lot about you.

    What's wrong with a barber? In MA at least, the licensing requirements for a barber are much more stringent than for "stylists."

    Barbers tend to be more utilitarian, stylists tend more towards the artistic. There are strengths and weaknesses in each approach. Honestly, I don't give a fuck what a haircutter wants to call themselves, as long as they do a good job, and like in most professions, the more skilled at your job you are, the more you can charge.

    In the market, the people who are willing to pay a lot for a haircut are looking for something over and above standard services; the style with which that service is performed, so 'stylist' indicates that artistic distinction. Your high-end aestheticians aren't going to be calling themselves 'barbers' simply because of that connotation.

    Nothing wrong with barbers; 'a good job' is subjective. May mean price, time, style, management, location, company etc. Depends on the buyer, and the needs they have to be met.

    Sarcastro on
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