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Cultural or updated versions of faery tales

noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
edited November 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
So for one of my lit classes, I have to compare a Grimm or 'standard' version of a faery tale with a cultural variant of it. Problem is, that except for the Disney versions of faery tales, I'm having a hard time coming up with any.

Can you guys throw out some? If they are in the written medium so much the better.

noir_blood on

Posts

  • IrohIroh Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    noir_blood wrote: »
    So for one of my lit classes, I have to compare a Grimm or 'standard' version of a faery tale with a cultural variant of it. Problem is, that except for the Disney versions of faery tales, I'm having a hard time coming up with any.

    Can you guys throw out some? If they are in the written medium so much the better.
    Bill Willingham's Fables might be a good lead, but it's not so much a retelling of those stories as it is a comic that happens to feature familiar characters.

    Iroh on
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  • noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Yeah, I definately thought of that, but unfortunately it's a bit too broad. Awesome comic though.

    noir_blood on
  • KiplingKipling Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    There is tons of source material adapted from Grimm.

    The Simpsons has ripped off multiple Grimm stories in the Halloween episodes.
    Superwhy on PBS, and practically every other children show does this as well. There are also like 50 different Cinderella's on Amazon. Find one at the city library.

    Pâté de Foie Gras by Isaac Asimov would be high class.

    Kipling on
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  • squeefishsqueefish Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    The Rose and the Beast by Francesca Lia Block might be interesting to look at. From what I remember of her work, she usually puts a feminist spin on fairytales.

    squeefish on
  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Wicked comes to mind right away.

    Kyougu on
  • ElinElin Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Enchanted - Orson Scott Card (Russian Sleeping Beauty)
    The Fire Rose - Mercedes Lackey (Modern Beauty and the Beast)
    The Serpents Shadow - Mercedes Lackey (Modern Snow White)

    Mercedes Lackey actually has an entire series of updated fairy tales, those two are my favorite. There are a tone of fantasy authors who use fairy tales, they're a great base. If you're looking for other cultures myths that parallel Grimm, they're out there but I can't think of any off the top of my head. I'll come back and edit if I do.

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  • QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Kyougu wrote: »
    Wicked comes to mind right away.

    This was my thought too.

    Quid on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Gregory Maguire has written a few stories that are based off of classic fairy tales, but he's written them in a more historical/realistic context. May be something like what you're looking for.

    "Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister" = Cinderella
    "Mirror Mirror" = Snow White

    And etc. He's the one who wrote Wicked, too.

    NightDragon on
  • AresProphetAresProphet Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Neil Gaiman rewrote Snow White. "Snow, Glass, Apples" from Smoke & Mirrors.

    It's, uh, interesting

    AresProphet on
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  • bone daddybone daddy Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2009
    bone daddy on
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  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    ch0613wishbone.jpg
    I'm fairly certain that Wishbone did some classic fairy tales at one point or other.

    see317 on
  • Bliss 101Bliss 101 Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Do variants that predate the "classic" version count? Charles Perrault's rather bleak version of Little Red Riding Hood comes to mind.

    Bliss 101 on
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  • HypatiaHypatia Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    There's a series of books edited by Windling and Datlow chock full of short stories of alternate takes on fairy tales: (I gave up on linking halfway through this list)

    Snow White, Blood Red, Black Thorn, White Rose, Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears, etc

    Other options include:
    Beauty: A retelling of the story of Beauty and the Beast, Outlaws of Sherwood (Robin Hood retelling), Spindle's End (Sleeping Beauty retelling) all by Robin McKinley
    Dragon of the Lost Sea and that whole series by Lawrence Yep (Retelling of some of the Chinese fairy tales like the Monkey King)
    The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by A. Wolf (3 little pigs story, children's book)
    Roald Dahl's Revolting Rhymes (4 retellings of various stories like Little Red Riding Hood, 3 little pigs, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Goldilocks)
    Almost every Sword and the Sorceress anthology book edited by Marion Zimmer Bradley has at least 1 short story in it that's a retelling of a fairy tale
    Mercedes Lackey's stuff like the Fire Rose, etc, people have already mentioned those

    For King Arthur stuff, all the Avalon Books by Marion Zimmer Bradley, the Crystal Cave stuff by Mary Stewart, the Once and Future King by T.H. White, The Fionavar Tapestry by Guy Gavriel Kay

    Hypatia on
  • GrisloGrislo Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Could you maybe define what your prof means by 'cultural variant'? While there are a lot of good suggestions in this thread, I wouldn't call most of them cultural variants.

    Some books you might find interesting, depending on the type of paper you're writing:

    Aarne, Antti. The Types of the Folktale: A classification and Bibliography.

    Lüthi, Max. The European Folktale: Form and Nature.

    Olrik, Axel. ‘Epic Laws of Folk Narrative’.

    Propp, Vladimir. Morphology of the Folktale.

    You could just go with a book focusing specifically on variations on one well know story. I think Maria Tatar has done a book on Bluebeard, for example (she's done some decent stuff on the Grimms, and on fairy tales in general as well, like editing a few Norton anthologies that might be worth checking out as they'll have variations on stories)

    Grislo on
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  • NewresNewres Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Iroh wrote: »
    noir_blood wrote: »
    So for one of my lit classes, I have to compare a Grimm or 'standard' version of a faery tale with a cultural variant of it. Problem is, that except for the Disney versions of faery tales, I'm having a hard time coming up with any.

    Can you guys throw out some? If they are in the written medium so much the better.
    Bill Willingham's Fables might be a good lead, but it's not so much a retelling of those stories as it is a comic that happens to feature familiar characters.

    There is that Fable retelling of the 1001 Nights though, called 1001 Nights of Snowfall where some of the stories might fit what you are looking for as they are mostly self contained.

    Newres on
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  • MoSiAcMoSiAc Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I haven't seen the movie but isn't that Grimm Brothers flick like about him actually being a part of most the tales he wrote?

    Would that work?

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  • TachTach Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Can I suggest "The Brothers Grimm" film by Terry Gilliam? Some interesting stuff in there.

    Tach on
  • noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Hey guys, we got more details on the assignment;

    We can only pick from a number of stories. Those are;

    Hansel and Gretel
    Little Mermaid
    Ant and the Grasshopper
    Princess and the Pea
    The Tortoise and the Hare
    Puss in Boots
    City Mouse and Farm mouse
    Little Red Riding Hood
    Emperor's new Clothes
    Three little pigs
    Rumpelstiltskin
    Three gruff goats
    Rapunzel
    Cinderella
    Goldilocks
    Snow White
    Chicken Little
    Frog Prince
    Jack and the Beanstalk
    Pied Piper

    I have emailed her to see if I can use other mediums, but the paper she handed out said we must read and annotate a culturalta variant. By that she means it can either be a different/modern take, or it can be and old take from another country. She uses Lon Po Po as eexample of a cultural variant of Little Red Riding Hood

    Since the assignment is due next Thursday, Big books are probably out. I would rather find something easily accessible in the internet/library.

    noir_blood on
  • FendallFendall Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I second the Neil Gaimans Snow, Glass, Apples. Its only a short story so you should be able to plow through it prety quick. It also deals with paedophiles, vampires and necrophiliacs. So good subject matter for a class assignment.

    Fendall on
  • noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Fendall wrote: »
    I second the Neil Gaimans Snow, Glass, Apples. Its only a short story so you should be able to plow through it prety quick. It also deals with paedophiles, vampires and necrophiliacs. So good subject matter for a class assignment.

    Awesome, it looks like it's easily accessible online, so yep, that's the one I'm going for. Thanks all, I wouldn't have found it without PA!

    noir_blood on
  • QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    noir_blood wrote: »
    Puss in Boots

    Would Maurice and his Amazing Rodents count for this?

    Edit: Whoops, you already picked and Gaiman's always a good choice.

    Quid on
  • corcorigancorcorigan Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. The comic, not the godawful movie.

    corcorigan on
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