Questions, Discussion, and Tutorials

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  • PillowmintPillowmint Registered User
    edited November 2009
    I'm not really sure what the poster above me did to incure the infraction so hopefully this doesn't break any rules. The link to the tutorial for scanning line-art in the OP is broken. Would someone be willing to point me in the right direction? I'd gladly take a PM if more links are verboten here. Any help is most definitely appreciated.

    It's just that I posted it as a new thread and not in here.

    Pillowmint on
  • CrowlestonCrowleston Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Crowleston on
    useless but necessary objects of society.
  • The SpecialistThe Specialist Happy Face Happy PlaceRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    You are awesome, thanks man.

    The Specialist on
    y54ucrle5wx0.png
    Origin Handle - OminousBulge
    XBox Live GT - TheOminousBulge

  • DMACDMAC Moderator mod
    edited November 2009
    I just picked up this book.

    9780823099238.jpg

    I'm only about 50 pages into it but so far it's been pretty good. It's aimed at people already familiar with Photoshop so it doesn't dumb things down or start with the absolute basics. There are a lot of tips on working digitally, setting up your brushes/toolbars, creating actions/shortcuts, etc. Lots of good stuff.

    DMAC on
  • NibCromNibCrom Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    DMAC wrote: »
    I just picked up this book.

    9780823099238.jpg

    I'm only about 50 pages into it but so far it's been pretty good. It's aimed at people already familiar with Photoshop so it doesn't dumb things down or start with the absolute basics. There are a lot of tips on working digitally, setting up your brushes/toolbars, creating actions/shortcuts, etc. Lots of good stuff.

    Is this a second edition? I seem to remember getting that book from the library, but I don't remember the cover looking like that. I would like to fraw the Marvel or DC way.

    NibCrom on
  • ManonvonSuperockManonvonSuperock Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I think you might be thinking of the DC Comics Guide to Penciling Comics.

    I've got the writing and coloring/lettering ones, both helpful.

    ManonvonSuperock on
  • NibCromNibCrom Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I think you are right, ManonvonSuperock. <- Not copied/pasted

    The one I read had coloring and lettering in it. I'll have to look into this one too. Thanks guys!

    NibCrom on
  • DMACDMAC Moderator mod
    edited November 2009
    DC has done a series of those How To books. I know they have one on writing, one on penciling, inking... I have the one on digital color...

    This one is all about how to create comic book artwork (not including coloring) from start to finish (roughs/pencils/inks) entirely on the computer. He also covers different "hybrid" ways of working such as printing out and traditionally inking digital pencils or scanning in hand drawn pencils and inking digitally.

    DMAC on
  • NibCromNibCrom Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    This is a terrific InDesign Book.

    adobeindesignstyles.jpg

    It's not for beginners, but for people that want to get to know InDesign more-than-a-friend, it breaks down all of the InDesign tools and features in very powerful ways.

    NibCrom on
  • MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    cOOL!

    MagicToaster on
  • PillowmintPillowmint Registered User
    edited November 2009
    Thanks guys, exactly what I was looking for :)

    Pillowmint on
  • Arden CaneloArden Canelo Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Its a good idea to have a well developed website to show your work (besides deviant art of course) before having a well developed resume in the art biz right?

    Arden Canelo on
  • PillowmintPillowmint Registered User
    edited November 2009
    bit of a boring tutorial but if you ever wanted to learn how to use the pen tool now you can :)

    http://www.photoshopessentials.com/basics/pen-tool-selections/

    Pillowmint on
  • MufasaJoeMufasaJoe Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I'm looking to try a drawing program other than Flash MX 2004 Educational Edition. I loaded up Open Canvas, but it doesn't look like it does tilt support for the Wacom. Any other options I should look into before loading up Photoshop?

    MufasaJoe on
  • LittleBootsLittleBoots Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Could try the The Gimp maybe.

    LittleBoots on

    Tofu wrote: Here be Littleboots, destroyer of threads and master of drunkposting.
  • MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    I'm making an envelope, which I cut, fold and glue myself. I used Ross Rubber cement to glue the folds together, but when I ship it, the heat weakens the glue and it is easy to come apart.

    Who can recommend me some strong glue?

    MagicToaster on
  • edited November 2009
    Could try the The Gimp maybe.

    I'll second this. It has a sharpish learning curve but once you get into it it is pretty useful/powerful.

    Richard M. Nixon on
    chevy.jpgsteve.jpgmartin.jpg
  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Who can recommend me some strong glue?

    Either use Sobo or PVA glue applied carefully but sparingly to both surfaces and pressed flat overnight under a couple dozen pounds of books/bricks/whatever.

    But I would just use naroow 3m Scotch double-sided tape. You can even stick it to a cutting mat and trim it to shapes and slivers with an x-acto. Glue and especially cement are shitty and inconvenient and should be avoided whenever possible.

    supabeast on
  • MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
    edited November 2009
    supabeast wrote: »
    Who can recommend me some strong glue?

    Either use Sobo or PVA glue applied carefully but sparingly to both surfaces and pressed flat overnight under a couple dozen pounds of books/bricks/whatever.

    But I would just use naroow 3m Scotch double-sided tape. You can even stick it to a cutting mat and trim it to shapes and slivers with an x-acto. Glue and especially cement are shitty and inconvenient and should be avoided whenever possible.

    I'll check out all these glues. I'd rather not use tape.

    MagicToaster on
  • Guy BellGuy Bell Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Anyone know anything about assigning colorsync profiles. Should I just leave it as imac rgb or generic or what?

    Guy Bell on
  • BuckwolfeBuckwolfe Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Out of curiosity, does anyone 'round here have videos of how they work? Like, your process, or whatever you feel like calling it. Maybe even examples of how an artist you look up to works. Something showing the progression of a particular piece. I'm feeling a little lost in the whole process of bring a piece from start to finish lately. I guess that's my latest art related dilemma.

    Buckwolfe on
  • mattharvestmattharvest Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Question regarding acrylic gel medium: is anyone aware of such a medium that is entirely clear while still wet? I"m working on improving my use of acrylics as glazings (to get more of an oil-style out of them), but it's hard to know how the colors will look when they dry while using the gel media I've been able to find.

    mattharvest on
  • NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Its a good idea to have a well developed website to show your work (besides deviant art of course) before having a well developed resume in the art biz right?

    "Before"?

    I'd say that showing - and having - work is more important than having a lot of experience on your resume. You shouldn't avoid putting work up because you're lacking a developed resume. The portfolio is the main thing they look at, anyhow. Experience helps of course (in getting a jorb), but you shouldn't wait for the experience before putting your work up on a website, if a web-portfolio is something you'd like to have. You can at least get exposure and feedback in the meantime.

    You should at least have a resume completed, however. Even if it's not filled with amazing experiences and skills just yet, I think having a final copy of one is certainly something you should have.
    Buckwolfe wrote: »
    Out of curiosity, does anyone 'round here have videos of how they work? Like, your process, or whatever you feel like calling it. Maybe even examples of how an artist you look up to works. Something showing the progression of a particular piece. I'm feeling a little lost in the whole process of bring a piece from start to finish lately. I guess that's my latest art related dilemma.

    I think Bobby Chiu is one (of quite a few) people who have videos up on Youtoobs: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bobby+chiu&search_type=&aq=9&oq=bobby+c
    Guy Bell wrote: »
    Anyone know anything about assigning colorsync profiles. Should I just leave it as imac rgb or generic or what?

    [edit] whoops, think I misunderstood, nevermind! Supabeast's got it below.
    Question regarding acrylic gel medium: is anyone aware of such a medium that is entirely clear while still wet? I"m working on improving my use of acrylics as glazings (to get more of an oil-style out of them), but it's hard to know how the colors will look when they dry while using the gel media I've been able to find.

    I haven't worked extensively with acrylics, but I think that you're going to run into that issue regardless. The more medium you add to the acrylic paint, the larger the difference is going to be between the wet version and the dry version of that mix. At least, that's been my experience. I don't think there's any acrylic medium that prevents this, though.

    NightDragon on
  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Guy Bell wrote: »
    Anyone know anything about assigning colorsync profiles. Should I just leave it as imac rgb or generic or what?

    If you need to do this for a living buy a few books and take a print production class. That said, unless your work is going to be printed just don’t worry about color profiles aside from turning off the “convert to sRGB” option in Photoshop’s “save for web” dialogue (sRGB conversion washes out saturated colors).

    If you are sending work to print, don’t do anything until it has to go to print, and then convert the image to the CMYK profile that matches the press being used to print it (you get this from the printer). If you’re doing inkjet prints you need to get the CMYK profiles for the printer from the manufacturer’s web site. Do not use other RGB or CMYK profiles for inkjets because CMYK inkjets are actually RGB devices that do their own conversion.

    supabeast on
  • deadlydoritodeadlydorito __BANNED USERS
    edited November 2009
    Buckwolfe wrote: »
    Out of curiosity, does anyone 'round here have videos of how they work? Like, your process, or whatever you feel like calling it. Maybe even examples of how an artist you look up to works. Something showing the progression of a particular piece. I'm feeling a little lost in the whole process of bring a piece from start to finish lately. I guess that's my latest art related dilemma.

    check out angel of bacons speed painting tutorial, i learned a lot from it, need a pro attitude

    deadlydorito on
  • BuckwolfeBuckwolfe Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    Thanks ND, and Dorito. I plan on checking both suggestions out after supper.

    I also feel kinda stupid, because i completely forgot I still have all my Massive Black tutorials on my external hard drive. I should really rewatch those.

    Buckwolfe on
  • CrowlestonCrowleston Registered User regular
    edited November 2009
    http://www.birdbook.org/

    Tossed this in chat but thought it would be helpful here too... Tons of high quality bird photos.

    Crowleston on
    useless but necessary objects of society.
  • exitexit Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    hey! i'm going to be printing some digital work out to sell at this ~student sale~ gig and this is kind of my first time doing this, so my main concerns right now (i think, at least? should i have more concerns? ;_; ) are pricing and size. my PC chugs enough on doing 8x11 at 300+DPI, but i think i should go bigger if i want to sell stuff? i can't tell if i just love huge things or if that really is way too small to expect people to purchase.

    and after that, suggestions as far as coming up with a correct price? i won't be framing, and i sure as hell won't be printing these things on paper made out of angel feathers and the laughter of babies, since this is me just kind of experimenting with this whole potentially profiting from art thing.

    exit on
  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Going over 300 DPI is only necessary if you’re going to be using effects that will look better after scaling down, such as noticeable blurs or sharpening.

    supabeast on
  • exitexit Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    yeah, i usually work at 300. i just put the + just in case. i don't think i've anything that'd need to go over.

    exit on
  • MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    There is something to be said for printing smaller, too.

    Post card size have their charm and would save you a ton on ink and paper.

    MagicToaster on
  • MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I'm gonna build a TV camera prop for theater. I have the body down, but what can double as the lense?

    MagicToaster on
  • NakedZerglingNakedZergling A more apocalyptic post apocalypse Portland OregonRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    PHOTOSHOP QUESTION!!! HELLLPPP!!!

    Ok so lets say you type the letter "G" on a layer. you then say use "layer style" to give it an "Outer glow" or any other effect. is there a way to basically flatten that effect so it's no longer an effect but just part of the image? i can't seem to figure it out.

    NakedZergling on
  • bombardierbombardier Moderator mod
    edited December 2009
    If you right click the layer, is there a rasterize option?

    bombardier on
  • GrennGrenn Registered User
    edited December 2009
    Make another blank layer, select both the blank layer and your 'G' later, right click and merge layers into one.

    There's probably a neater way of doing it but that works!

    Grenn on
  • CrowlestonCrowleston Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    There might be a better way to do it but...

    Create a new blank layer underneath the "Letter G" layer. Right click the "Letter G" Layer > Rasterize Type, then merge the layer down onto the blank layer.

    edit: DOHH!

    Crowleston on
    useless but necessary objects of society.
  • NakedZerglingNakedZergling A more apocalyptic post apocalypse Portland OregonRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    bombardier wrote: »
    If you right click the layer, is there a rasterize option?

    nope

    NakedZergling on
  • NakedZerglingNakedZergling A more apocalyptic post apocalypse Portland OregonRegistered User regular
    edited December 2009
    GRENN and CROW
    YES thank you guys!! that is perfect! thank you!!!

    NakedZergling on
  • FlayFlay Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    ARGH! I have been fighting with illustrator for the last hour and a half trying to do the simplest task, and I just cannot do it! I'm trying to fit this grid (created using the 'rectangular grid tool') in to this shape (so it can be in perspective), without having to outline the strokes...

    29ehjrp.jpg

    And this is as close as I can get...

    2untwm0.jpg

    But as soon as I try and transform the last point, all the other points change position and the perspective is lost. How the hell do I transform this thing so it will fit exactly in that shape?

    EDIT: I've tried envelope distort - that just makes all the lines go curvy and look even worse. The 3D effect tools are too imprecise to fit the shape exactly in the box.

    Flay on
  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Outline the strokes, put it into perspective, convert it to guides, and then create a new one and align the lines with the guides.

    supabeast on
This discussion has been closed.