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Cut-throat razor

Teslan26Teslan26 Registered User regular
edited December 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
Simply put - want to buy a friend who is returning from a long exile a cut-throat razor as it is something I know he has always wanted.

Any advice on brands/things to look for/accesories/shit I have not thought of.

Teslan26 on

Posts

  • CausticWitCausticWit Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    http://www.artofshaving.com This is where I got mine and I can attest that they are great. For any straight razor you will need a good strop for conditioning the blade. Lessons on how to use one are also recommended if your friend doesn't know how to use it.

    CausticWit on
  • SmokeStacksSmokeStacks Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    A while ago I was thinking of getting a straight razor, but didn't want to jump in without knowing what sort of improvement I would be getting versus s standard safety razor.

    So I asked an old-school barber.

    This was back before the health department banned the practice, but basically he told me that he gets people asking him a lot to get a straight razor shave right before their weddings or important events and things like that, but he tells them that the first time they do it they will get a lot of irritation and redness.

    So, assuming he was right, how long should it take for a person's face/neck to be able to transition from a safety or electric razor to a straight razor? Is there a lot of irritation in the beginning caused by getting a much closer shave?

    SmokeStacks on
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    www.badgerandblade.com
    Its like the Penny Arcade of shaving. For something worthwhile, you're looking at several hundred easy (including stopping leather, soap, brush, and some nice after shave). I'll be more than happy to to talk about my experiences with a safety razor, some soaps, and some general skin care if you'd like.

    As for getting irritation, well, its true your skin does need to get used to it, but people also react differently to different prep and cream. There is a lot of technique involved/required to get a good shave and not fuck your skin up with a straight and a safety razor. At the end of the day though, us hobbyists truly believe we not only get a better shave, but it makes the entire experience more enjoyable and cheaper. I bought 150 blades for like, $10, each blade lasts about a week.

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • PracticalProblemSolverPracticalProblemSolver Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I wouldn't buy a nice straight razor for a friend, it's too risky, he might hate it. Give him a nice badger bristle brush, soap and a cool mug and that sets up the foundation for any kind of nice shave.

    PracticalProblemSolver on
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    If you tell us your budget, we (well, some of us I imagine) can help point you in the right direction equipment wise. Well, us or Badger and Blade.

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • ddahcmaiddahcmai Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Classicshaving.com is also a good site to check out for supplies. Make sure you do your research before you buy anything, or you can miss something important. Using a straight razor doesn't just mean you buy a straight razor, you'll need a hone, strops, pastes, ideally a shaving brush and mug, quality shave soap or cream, and maybe a styptic pencil or alum block since nicks are unfortunately quite easy to give yourself.

    I like Taylor of Old Bond Street shaving cream, and you can get an inexpensive but quality badger brush at http://www.duluthtrading.com/ just search for shaving brush.

    And if he needs help learning how to use all this crap, Mantic59 has some good videos on youtube about mixing a proper lather and that sort of stuff.

    ddahcmai on
  • Teslan26Teslan26 Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I wouldn't buy a nice straight razor for a friend, it's too risky, he might hate it. Give him a nice badger bristle brush, soap and a cool mug and that sets up the foundation for any kind of nice shave.


    Well, he was telling me a while ago that he always had this wish to have a cut-throat razor and shave properly. So pretty sure he will be greatful and like it.

    I am in the UK. Am sharing the cost with at least 1 other person, maybe 2 looking at the cost of these things. Still £100+ would be top end of my finances. I think I would rather just buy the blade and leave him to get the other stuff himself if that would result in better quality

    Teslan26 on
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Buying him a blade and only a blade is a bit dick because he then has to spend a couple hundred of his own. Oh, and then he has to research a fuck ton of info. It's a tricky thing to buy for someone.

    Maybe you live near a good store.
    http://www.frappr.com/shavingsupplies

    edit: If you really want to buy him some nice shaving gear, get him a nice badger brush, a nice soap and/or cream, and a nice after shave. He'll be able to use that with any razor, which means hell be able to use it all right away. Your budget should be able to fit that.

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • Teslan26Teslan26 Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    http://www.menkind.co.uk/mens-accessories-c113/health-grooming-c9/shaving-c76/cyril-r-salter-black-ebonized-box-set-p110476

    Is that a bad blade? I am slightly bemused by the sharpening stone, since that is what I use on my outdoors knives and seems indelicate for a razor.


    It is within my budget, and leaves some money left over for appropriate soap/cream. As long as it is half-decent it seems like an excellent choice. He would have to buy himself the leather strop at some point.

    Teslan26 on
  • NamrokNamrok Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Ah straight razors.

    So I purchased this set over 2 years ago.

    http://www.classicshaving.com/catalog/item/4065811/7023279.htm

    Later on I bought a wetstone so I could do all my own maintenance on it, along with some MAAS metal polish. And that's all I've spent on shaving since.

    I can't recall it taking time for my face to get used to it. It did however take some time for my hands to develop the muscle memory to not cut myself.

    On a side note, the only things you absolutely have to purchase is the blade and strop. I have easily just used regular shaving cream applied with my hand in a pinch. The brush and mug are nice, but not required. The strop is a must though, every time I've ever shaved without stropping first I've regretted it.

    Namrok on
  • Teslan26Teslan26 Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    http://www.menkind.co.uk/mens-accessories-c113/health-grooming-c9/shaving-c76/leather-strop-p110470

    Adds another £40 which is really pushing the boat out a bit >_>

    Teslan26 on
  • NamrokNamrok Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    I'd dump that set you picked out previously, with the brush and the box and all that, and try to find a set that includes a razor and strop. You might need to shop around at a different site. But I really can't emphasize the importance of a strop. It's the difference between a shave that feels like its ripping out your hair and leaves your burned and cut vs a shave where the blade just glides across your skin neatly slicing the hair off.

    Namrok on
  • Teslan26Teslan26 Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    OK.

    Would that be a reasonable blade in that set though? Like as a chef I was always very aware of the effect quality of blade had on sharpness and keeping an edge.

    Teslan26 on
  • JWFokkerJWFokker Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    You can get a brand new razor, but I like the vintage Dubl Duck razors because they have some character. You'll need to troll ebay for one because they're not easy to find these days.

    JWFokker on
  • VirumVirum Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    There are disposable straight razor blades that are fairly cheap. They last a long time and are good for traveling so if he likes it and decides to invest in a full kit he's still has a reason to keep it around.

    http://www.classicshaving.com/catalog/item/522940/286100.htm

    I started out with this and still use it since I am still poor and unwilling to unload so much cash for a real kit when this works great.

    Now I don't have super thick beard, but each blade easily lasts me a month, sometimes longer if I get lazy.

    Virum on
  • JWFokkerJWFokker Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Virum wrote: »
    There are disposable straight razor blades that are fairly cheap. They last a long time and are good for traveling so if he likes it and decides to invest in a full kit he's still has a reason to keep it around.

    http://www.classicshaving.com/catalog/item/522940/286100.htm

    I started out with this and still use it since I am still poor and unwilling to unload so much cash for a real kit when this works great.

    Now I don't have super thick beard, but each blade easily lasts me a month, sometimes longer if I get lazy.

    The Feather brand disposable straight razor blades are incredible. Though arguably too sharp. But keep in mind that they make some of the sharpest surgical blades in the world. Blades for shaving are relatively dull by comparison.

    JWFokker on
  • FrazFraz Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Hey folks, I need some advice on shaving. Would it be appropriate to jack this thread?

    I'll post my questions anyway, but I'll delete and move or start a new thread if I have to.

    I'll be heading into an environment where I'll be expected to have an extremely close shave every day and I'll probably only have a couple of minutes to get it done. I hear that as far as shaving closeness goes straight blade > safety razor > disposable cartridges > electric. Is this correct?

    I've been experimenting with the multi-blade stuff you get from Gillete with the little battery in it. It's pretty close, but not exactly close enough unless I go against the grain which I'm afraid of doing. Any advice?

    Fraz on
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    A couple of minutes?
    Like... five? Yea, I can whip up a lather and shave in five minutes, but you're going to need some decent practice before you're getting a BBS (baby butt smooth, learn the lingo!) shave like that. You need to be in control and take some time with a straight or safety razor. You might get a nice quick shave with a Mach 3 or equivalent and a nice lather built from cream/soap. Building the lather doesn't take that long, its the good prep that goes into a good shave that takes time.

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • FrazFraz Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    A couple of minutes?
    Like... five? Yea, I can whip up a lather and shave in five minutes, but you're going to need some decent practice before you're getting a BBS (baby butt smooth, learn the lingo!) shave like that. You need to be in control and take some time with a straight or safety razor. You might get a nice quick shave with a Mach 3 or equivalent and a nice lather built from cream/soap. Building the lather doesn't take that long, its the good prep that goes into a good shave that takes time.

    I'm pretty sure I won't have time to whip up a lather.

    I'm only concerned because my face will probably be inspected, and I have a pretty thick beard.

    Also, is it okay to shave up?

    Fraz on
  • TheFullMetalChickenTheFullMetalChicken Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Second for the blade and badger I lurked those forums for months before buying my first straight. They will point you in the right direction for finding them locally and great ebay and custom people.

    TheFullMetalChicken on
  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited December 2009
    Fraz wrote: »
    A couple of minutes?
    Like... five? Yea, I can whip up a lather and shave in five minutes, but you're going to need some decent practice before you're getting a BBS (baby butt smooth, learn the lingo!) shave like that. You need to be in control and take some time with a straight or safety razor. You might get a nice quick shave with a Mach 3 or equivalent and a nice lather built from cream/soap. Building the lather doesn't take that long, its the good prep that goes into a good shave that takes time.

    I'm pretty sure I won't have time to whip up a lather.

    I'm only concerned because my face will probably be inspected, and I have a pretty thick beard.

    Also, is it okay to shave up?

    Don't think of it as up as much as against the grain. Hair grows in some crazy ass direction, it isn't all down.
    Learn the way your hair grows all over your face, it changes
    To do so, shave, and later in the day when you've hit stubble, run a cotton ball all over your face. if it snags, that's against the grain. But yes, shaving ATG (against the grain, there is also XTG and WTG) is the only real way to get BBS but it opens you up to irritation. I've heard great things about certain shave oils (the Best Shave Ever can be found i Wallmart). Also, yea, get some after shave. I use both a lotion and an astringent. With hazel is good. Also, consider getting an aluminum block, that will help kill irritation which you are bound to get shaving fast and close.

    Are you going into the military? An old teacher of mine had a 5 o'clock shadow by 11am. His father was in the Navy and had to shave twice a day. Any new shaving style takes some time for your skin to get used to it. If time is really of the essence, well, you might just find a nice electric.

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
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