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WotC Premier Store Program

DrainDrain [E] Tabletop ManagerSeattleRegistered User regular
edited March 2010 in Critical Failures
Premier Store Program .(pdf)

So I just became aware of this today. I read the link above and also read online that "Premier Stores" will get to sell DnD and stuff 2 weeks before the street date. In other words, unless you just through WotC's hoops you'll be 2 weeks late to the party?

I have a friend who owns a store, hosts draft tourneys every week and he is up in arms about this. He contacted WotC directly and told them how he felt. I believe it was a way more colorful version of, "You are failing to support independent, local game stores... friend!" I don't know, I wasn't there for the phone call.

Anyway, I came here to find out what you all know and think of this Premier Store Program. Yeah it's nice to get the new Monster's Manual 2 weeks early but is this really fucking over our favorite Mom & Pop game stores? Has WotC finally gone too far? Will District 10 be better than District 9?

Please tell me what you know about the program because I need ammo I mean uh facts. :)

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"I don't know why people ever, ever try to stop nerds from doing things. It's really the most incredible waste of time." - Tycho
Drain on

Posts

  • admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Uhhh... it seems stupidly easy to become a "Premier Store." It looks like they're trying to support FLGSs over eBay and online stores. What's your friend's problem here?

    (edit to sound less like a dick: I could certainly imagine their being under-the-hood factors that make this far more sinister than it appears, but on the surface this:
    • Have a physical hobby retail store
    • Have dedicated play space enough for at least 8 people (we prefer room for 10 or more) to be able to walk in, sit down and start playing games at any time
    • Conduct the majority of your business through that physical retail store

    is reasonable and very smart.)

    admanb on
  • DrainDrain [E] Tabletop Manager SeattleRegistered User regular
    edited March 2010
    I'm not sure what the problem is. However I did just find out the tournament have to be "sanctioned."

    Drain on
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    "I don't know why people ever, ever try to stop nerds from doing things. It's really the most incredible waste of time." - Tycho
  • admanbadmanb unionize your workplace Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Running sanctioned events is also really easy.

    This is the kind of thing that's hard to judge on the surface. Have you asked your friend why it's not a good thing that he can become a Premier Store and get products two weeks ahead of, say, Amazon? It seems like a really big boon to physical game stores in an era where being a physical game store is really fucking hard.

    admanb on
  • DrainDrain [E] Tabletop Manager SeattleRegistered User regular
    edited March 2010
    That's a good point, I'll ask him about that.

    Drain on
    N9pjfAk.png
    "I don't know why people ever, ever try to stop nerds from doing things. It's really the most incredible waste of time." - Tycho
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    The only issue on that list for any store should be the play space for small Mall stores and the like.

    Any store that has that space but doesn't make it available is a store I don't see why I'd patronize when the internet is right here.

    DevoutlyApathetic on
    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
  • SlickShughesSlickShughes Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    My FLGS is a premier store, and there is no way they meet that space requirement. Not without moving half their board game stock into storage. So I doubt they really enforce these rules overmuch.

    Side note: I would love to hear what the WotC rep who took the call is saying to his coworkers about it. "Your program designed to help FLGS's is screwing over my FLGS!!!"

    SlickShughes on
  • DarianDarian Yellow Wizard The PitRegistered User regular
    edited March 2010
    My FLGS is definitely part of this program; they've gotten some nice new laminated posters for announcing upcoming events and such out of it already.

    But the majority of the space in the store is dedicated to rows of tables for gaming (comics are on the walls all around, with one wall for board games and RPGs, with MtG cards in a display case and behind the register).

    Last night, they had about 16 people for the MtG tournament, 6 or so playing EDH, 7 playing D&D, someone playtesting a self-made game with 2-4 people, and 4 of us playing Runewars.

    Darian on
  • DelmainDelmain Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    My FLGS is CoolStuffInc. =(

    Delmain on
  • ravensmuseravensmuse Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Yeah, the tiny ass store that just opened up like, ten minutes away from me is a Premier store. If they can do it, I can't see why others can't.

    On that note, I'm not a big fan of "saving" Mom and Pop stores if they're trying desperately to *not* turn a profit; I've been in far too many game stores that seem to think it's a hobby, rather than a business. They don't deserve my dime and I don't mind watching them fall.

    ravensmuse on
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  • DelmainDelmain Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    ravensmuse wrote: »
    Yeah, the tiny ass store that just opened up like, ten minutes away from me is a Premier store. If they can do it, I can't see why others can't.

    On that note, I'm not a big fan of "saving" Mom and Pop stores if they're trying desperately to *not* turn a profit; I've been in far too many game stores that seem to think it's a hobby, rather than a business. They don't deserve my dime and I don't mind watching them fall.

    I don't think anyone tries "desperately" to not turn a profit, I just think that when they're looking at a choice between making a little bit more money and helping their customers have more fun, they usually choose the latter.

    Delmain on
  • ravensmuseravensmuse Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    With the exception of two stores that I've been to (okay, I'll count three, but the third is the tiny store I mentioned that just opened) every single one has been staffed by people that just don't care about taking care of customers. They ignore the counter so they can sit around playing Magic or talking to their buddies about video games, or they're in the back messing around with computers. I've had the one helpful person behind the counter dragged away by another playing around on the computer, no shit, for a lolcat she was laughing at.

    Most game stores are treated like glorified clubhouses with stuff for sale, and not like a business. I'd rather do my shopping online, honestly.

    ravensmuse on
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  • MaticoreMaticore A Will To Power Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    On the other hand, a decent number of people like game stores because they feel like a clubhouse and not a business.

    Maticore on
  • DmanDman Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Wizards of the coast has been doing stuff like this for trading card games and my understanding is that it has given brick and mortar game shops (and the games themselves) a solid boost. I'm not surprised they are trying it for some of their other products.

    My advice is to stop complaining and jump through the hoops, lie a little if you have to, if you're a brick and mortar hobby shop where people can hang out and play games that will do. My store sets up extra tables in the mall for release events because is it space limited.

    My hobby shop has friendly professional staff and I support them.

    Dman on
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    The only issue on that list for any store should be the play space for small Mall stores and the like.

    Any store that has that space but doesn't make it available is a store I don't see why I'd patronize when the internet is right here.
    If you start allowing mall stores to do this, then Barnes & Noble is going to qualify, and that pretty much defeats the purpose.

    Thanatos on
  • ravensmuseravensmuse Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Maticore wrote: »
    On the other hand, a decent number of people like game stores because they feel like a clubhouse and not a business.

    So open a clubhouse.

    Seriously. There is no excuse for disgusting stores, unfriendly staff, and listening to Yu-Gi-Oh stories from neckbeards. I go forty-five minutes north to reach the store that's the complete opposite of that and spend lots of happy money there.

    ravensmuse on
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  • PinfeldorfPinfeldorf Yeah ZestRegistered User regular
    edited March 2010
    ravensmuse wrote: »
    Maticore wrote: »
    On the other hand, a decent number of people like game stores because they feel like a clubhouse and not a business.

    So open a clubhouse.

    Seriously. There is no excuse for disgusting stores, unfriendly staff, and listening to Yu-Gi-Oh stories from neckbeards. I go forty-five minutes north to reach the store that's the complete opposite of that and spend lots of happy money there.

    I'm not sure how you managed to find a store completely devoid of neckbeards and disgustingness, but I want to go to there.

    Pinfeldorf on
  • ravensmuseravensmuse Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    ravensmuse wrote: »
    Maticore wrote: »
    On the other hand, a decent number of people like game stores because they feel like a clubhouse and not a business.

    So open a clubhouse.

    Seriously. There is no excuse for disgusting stores, unfriendly staff, and listening to Yu-Gi-Oh stories from neckbeards. I go forty-five minutes north to reach the store that's the complete opposite of that and spend lots of happy money there.

    I'm not sure how you managed to find a store completely devoid of neckbeards and disgustingness, but I want to go to there.

    Jumpgate Comics and Books. Route 1, Portsmouth, NH.

    ravensmuse on
    READ MY BLOG - Web Serial Fantasy - Tabletop Gaming Snips & Reviews - Flea Market Hunting
  • TehSlothTehSloth Hit Or Miss I Guess They Never Miss, HuhRegistered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    ravensmuse wrote: »
    Maticore wrote: »
    On the other hand, a decent number of people like game stores because they feel like a clubhouse and not a business.

    So open a clubhouse.

    Seriously. There is no excuse for disgusting stores, unfriendly staff, and listening to Yu-Gi-Oh stories from neckbeards. I go forty-five minutes north to reach the store that's the complete opposite of that and spend lots of happy money there.

    I'm not sure how you managed to find a store completely devoid of neckbeards and disgustingness, but I want to go to there.

    Yeah, I usually end up going to the game store with the higher neckbeard/sq. ft ratio on account of it's prices being reasonable. I still haven't entirely decided whether the staff are just useless or whether they're horribly understaffed, because in order to actually buy anything you have to:

    Find what you want on the handy dandy computer terminals set up which shows there website.
    Press the handy dandy button that processes the order and gives you an "order number"
    Track somebody down who works there (usually the hardest part)
    Give them order number
    Wait for them to retrieve your items and charge you for them

    If I could actually walk up to a counter with my order number and give it to someone, it wouldn't be as bad, but usually there's a good 15-20 minute wait involved where you're just kind of standing around awkwardly waiting for someone to appear so you can get the hell out of there, and you can just forget about it if there's an ongoing magic tournament.

    TehSloth on
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  • DmanDman Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Thanatos wrote: »
    The only issue on that list for any store should be the play space for small Mall stores and the like.

    Any store that has that space but doesn't make it available is a store I don't see why I'd patronize when the internet is right here.
    If you start allowing mall stores to do this, then Barnes & Noble is going to qualify, and that pretty much defeats the purpose.

    The idea is that you have to actually host sanctioned play on a regular bases. I agree that it doesn't really matter how much space you have if you're not actually promoting the game via getting people playing it in your store.

    It's about helping physical stores because gamers (magic, D&D, etc) need physical places to play in, and incentives to play more (tournaments, prizes) so that they buy more WotC product. It's been working out pretty well for WotC, the stores that choose to participate and (from my perspective) the people who play their games.

    Given the recent massive success I highly doubt WotC is going to change their marketing policy.

    Dman on
  • DelmainDelmain Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    TehSloth wrote: »
    Pinfeldorf wrote: »
    ravensmuse wrote: »
    Maticore wrote: »
    On the other hand, a decent number of people like game stores because they feel like a clubhouse and not a business.

    So open a clubhouse.

    Seriously. There is no excuse for disgusting stores, unfriendly staff, and listening to Yu-Gi-Oh stories from neckbeards. I go forty-five minutes north to reach the store that's the complete opposite of that and spend lots of happy money there.

    I'm not sure how you managed to find a store completely devoid of neckbeards and disgustingness, but I want to go to there.

    Yeah, I usually end up going to the game store with the higher neckbeard/sq. ft ratio on account of it's prices being reasonable. I still haven't entirely decided whether the staff are just useless or whether they're horribly understaffed, because in order to actually buy anything you have to:

    Find what you want on the handy dandy computer terminals set up which shows there website.
    Press the handy dandy button that processes the order and gives you an "order number"
    Track somebody down who works there (usually the hardest part)
    Give them order number
    Wait for them to retrieve your items and charge you for them

    If I could actually walk up to a counter with my order number and give it to someone, it wouldn't be as bad, but usually there's a good 15-20 minute wait involved where you're just kind of standing around awkwardly waiting for someone to appear so you can get the hell out of there, and you can just forget about it if there's an ongoing magic tournament.

    Bull Sloth, I don't think I've ever waited more than a few minutes at CoolStuff unless there was a line. And yes, sometimes there is a line because we go when there are Magic tournaments and there are people buying 5-6 specific magic cards.

    Delmain on
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Dman wrote: »
    Thanatos wrote: »
    The only issue on that list for any store should be the play space for small Mall stores and the like.

    Any store that has that space but doesn't make it available is a store I don't see why I'd patronize when the internet is right here.
    If you start allowing mall stores to do this, then Barnes & Noble is going to qualify, and that pretty much defeats the purpose.

    The idea is that you have to actually host sanctioned play on a regular bases. I agree that it doesn't really matter how much space you have if you're not actually promoting the game via getting people playing it in your store.

    It's about helping physical stores because gamers (magic, D&D, etc) need physical places to play in, and incentives to play more (tournaments, prizes) so that they buy more WotC product. It's been working out pretty well for WotC, the stores that choose to participate and (from my perspective) the people who play their games.

    Given the recent massive success I highly doubt WotC is going to change their marketing policy.

    My local hobby shop is actually in the major mall in the area and they have a good chunk of space given over to play tables. This is a store that killed a Games Workshop store in the same mall. Was rather impressed with that. Anyways, there are a couple empty spots in the mall so they probably got a reasonable price on that space after being a tenant for awhile.

    As for this helping D&D like it helped Magic.....I don't see it. Organized play in Magic can actually mean something competitively and it's not like it's easy to organize a booster draft every week at your house. Compared to D&D which doesn't work well competitively and with random strangers (with pre-generated adventures) that's actually easier to get running out of your home than in a shop....

    I like the idea I just don't hold high hopes for it to work.

    DevoutlyApathetic on
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  • LockedOnTargetLockedOnTarget Registered User regular
    edited March 2010
    Can a store that runs MTG sanctioned events but not D&D events still get the D&D product two weeks early?

    Because if so, I can see this having a positive impact.

    LockedOnTarget on
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