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I do not know how to cook beef.

JinniganJinnigan Registered User regular
edited January 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
Seriously. I bought a sirloin steak and chopped it up and tried to make a cheesesteak and while it was edible it was not very good.

How do I cook beef? Are there preparatory steps I need to take? Am I supposed to do more than just throw it in the pan? How can I make tasty delicious philly cheesesteaks?

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    KMFurDMKMFurDM Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    You just chopped it up? If you are buying your own meat (you really want rib eye) you will want to slice it first, against the grain. Slice it thin and don't bother with lean meat. You will want to keep some moisture in it and that will come from the fat. No point in trying to be healthy with a cheesesteak. And do not overcook it. Being thin means you can easily overdo it. Medium well seems to be what the places around the city get to. Just after you see no more pink in the meat.

    Get some decent Amoroso rolls and your choice of cheese. My current favorite is a combination of Whiz and American. Stunning.

    KMFurDM on
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    an_altan_alt Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    There are tons of things to remember, but I'll give you a few.

    Sirloin isn't the most tender meat, so marinating it does help. Cut it into relatively thin strips. It's not ground beef so don't cook the hell out if it. It shouldn't take very long to cook to a nice pink medium. With a lean meat like sirloin, the last thing you want to do is dry it out. Feel free to toss in some pepper, garlic powder, and other odd spices into the mix to kick up the flavor a bit. Cook your veg with the meat.

    Beef is usually fairly easy to cook, so once you get the hang of it only minor tweaks are required.

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    lunarwulflunarwulf Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    When preparing your philly cheese steak, it should be cut before you start preparing it, and it is best to marinate your steak in worcestshire and pepper. (alternately you can use A1 marinades)

    If you don't have time for this, you can skip it. (Not the cutting part)

    For cooking with a frying pan:

    Use only a dollop (very small amount) of butter or cooking spray.

    The steak, if fatty, will grease your pan for you, just remember to start the steak off on low and work up to medium, once the pan has a good grease coating. Next you will want to add your onions and or peppers and then add worcestshire sauce to your liking. The veggies will cook pretty fast as long as they're not frozen, worcestshire will help tenderize and brown your ingredients as well as give it flavor.

    Once everything is sauteed sufficciently, transfer to a plate with paper towels to let excess grease drain. Once this is finished, transfer to a roll and place the cheese of your choice on top (I reccomend swiss or provologne), then place on a baking sheet and put in the oven until bread is toasted and cheeses is melted.

    For cooking on a flat top grill:

    place steak on grill, adding worcestshire and pepper, once meat is almost ready, add onions and/or peppers to the steak, chop these up as it cooks and add more worcestshire to your taste. Once meat is almost ready, add cheese of your choice (I reccomend swiss or provologne) to the top and let grill until cheese is melted.

    Have a roll toasting in oven ready for transfer.

    I would reccomend looking into some specialty rolls, sub rolls are best, but you can find seasoned rolls out there.

    A lot of people use mayo for their philly's, and if you're one of them you might trying looking into flavored mayonaisses such as garlic, herb/garlic, or sweet pepper.

    Hope this works for you.

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    DiscGraceDiscGrace Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    A really easy beef recipe, if you have access to a crock pot:

    1.) Put a rump roast or pot roast cut in the crock pot.
    2.) Cover the roast with water.
    3.) Throw a packet of Mrs. Grass's onion soup mix on top.
    4.) (optional) Add in chopped carrots and taters.

    Cook on high for an hour before you leave home in the morning, then on low until you want dinner. It will be so tender.

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    King KongKing Kong Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    If cheesesteak is your deal if you look in the frozen food section at your local grocer they should have some you can just warm up in a pan, pre-sliced and pre-cooked that's made just for Phillys.

    I've cut and cooked my own and used the frozen stuff and couldn't tell the diffrence.

    King Kong on
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    Omnicron9999Omnicron9999 Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    King Kong wrote:
    If cheesesteak is your deal if you look in the frozen food section at your local grocer they should have some you can just warm up in a pan, pre-sliced and pre-cooked that's made just for Phillys.

    I've cut and cooked my own and used the frozen stuff and couldn't tell the diffrence.

    I think the frozen "food" Kong is referring to might be Steak Ums.

    (not sure of spelling or punctuation)

    Anyway, they are thin slices of beef, practically begging to be made into sandwiches. They cook in 30 seconds, taste like beef, and are really cheap.

    Totally not like a real cheese steak, but close, especially for the money.

    Omnicron9999 on
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    KMFurDMKMFurDM Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    lunarwulf wrote:
    A lot of people use mayo for their philly's, and if you're one of them you might trying looking into flavored mayonaisses such as garlic, herb/garlic, or sweet pepper.

    Mayo? On a cheesesteak? Where?

    KMFurDM on
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    MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    KMFurDM wrote:
    lunarwulf wrote:
    A lot of people use mayo for their philly's, and if you're one of them you might trying looking into flavored mayonaisses such as garlic, herb/garlic, or sweet pepper.

    Mayo? On a cheesesteak? Where?

    Everwhere except the metro-Philly area.

    Malkor on
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    PoyndexterPoyndexter Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Malkor wrote:
    KMFurDM wrote:
    lunarwulf wrote:
    A lot of people use mayo for their philly's, and if you're one of them you might trying looking into flavored mayonaisses such as garlic, herb/garlic, or sweet pepper.

    Mayo? On a cheesesteak? Where?

    Everwhere except the metro-Philly area.

    Shit, you can' get a Philly around here without mayo on it, this is in Texas of course. We like to rape other cultures food stuffs here.

    Poyndexter on
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    KMFurDMKMFurDM Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited January 2007
    Poyndexter wrote:
    Malkor wrote:
    KMFurDM wrote:
    lunarwulf wrote:
    A lot of people use mayo for their philly's, and if you're one of them you might trying looking into flavored mayonaisses such as garlic, herb/garlic, or sweet pepper.

    Mayo? On a cheesesteak? Where?

    Everwhere except the metro-Philly area.

    Shit, you can' get a Philly around here without mayo on it, this is in Texas of course. We like to rape other cultures food stuffs here.

    I like mayo and all...but on a warm to hot sandwhich that is saturated with glorious melted cheese or a cheese like product? Gross. :)

    KMFurDM on
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    UncleChetUncleChet N00b Lancaster, PARegistered User regular
    edited January 2007
    Mayo on a cheese steak is a sachrelige to me. I've used steak-ums as another poster suggested and they work great. I also love the american/whiz cheese combo for my steak sandwhiches. If doing it with real steak try putting the meat in the freezer for about 30 minutes prior to cutting it, as this makes slicing it that much easier.

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    VeeveeVeevee WisconsinRegistered User regular
    edited January 2007
    KMFurDM wrote:
    Poyndexter wrote:
    Malkor wrote:
    KMFurDM wrote:
    lunarwulf wrote:
    A lot of people use mayo for their philly's, and if you're one of them you might trying looking into flavored mayonaisses such as garlic, herb/garlic, or sweet pepper.

    Mayo? On a cheesesteak? Where?

    Everwhere except the metro-Philly area.

    Shit, you can' get a Philly around here without mayo on it, this is in Texas of course. We like to rape other cultures food stuffs here.

    I like mayo and all...but on a warm to hot sandwhich that is saturated with glorious melted cheese or a cheese like product? Gross. :)

    Depends on the mayo. Hellmans gets really good and very tasty when warmed, but things like Miracle Whip get ass nasty when warmed. Of course, different people will taste things differently, so YMMV.

    Veevee on
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    liquidloganliquidlogan Registered User regular
    edited January 2007
    The reason that people but mayo on sandwiches is to keep the bread from getting soaked with the juices from the meat. Essentially, because Mayo is fat, it serves as a barrier from any excess moisture from anything (whether it be beef in this case, or tomato in other) from finding a home in the bread. Thats why a lot of the times when people get burgers home they find the bread got all mushy. That said, you don't need a slathering of mayo. A thin layer is more than enough, and a light mayo thinly placed on a sandwich can both keep the bread from getting soggy and barely noticeable (taste wise) for about an hour without making you extra unhealthy. But I don't know what the traditional way is. I'm just going by what I've seen.

    liquidlogan on
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