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Where should I be applying for work?

zktzkt Registered User regular
edited June 2010 in Help / Advice Forum
Ill try to keep this brief: I graduated almost a year and a half ago and have been unable to find work. Ive applied to Walmart, Kmart, Best Buy, and almost every other similar department store. For reasons outside of my control I cannot drive. I would prefer a job where interaction with the general public is minimum because I don't consider myself a people person. Ive gone to temp agencies and usually hear back once every 4-6 months about a position 35 miles away it would be difficult/impossible for me to commute to..or never hear from anyone at all.

zkt on

Posts

  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Volume.

    Every day go through Craigslist and other sources and send an application to every job that you seem interested in. It is not uncommon for a job search to take upwards of 12 months for a new grad with restrictions. The more resumes and applications you send out, the better chance of finding that job for you. It's really a crap-shoot: it could be the first one you send out that works out for you, or it could be the last after hundreds and hundreds of frustrations.

    The Crowing One on
    3rddocbottom.jpg
  • zktzkt Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Volume.

    Every day go through Craigslist and other sources and send an application to every job that you seem interested in. It is not uncommon for a job search to take upwards of 12 months for a new grad with restrictions. The more resumes and applications you send out, the better chance of finding that job for you. It's really a crap-shoot: it could be the first one you send out that works out for you, or it could be the last after hundreds and hundreds of frustrations.

    So far all Ive received from Craigslist are bot replies. I still check it every day for some reason, but I mainly use Careerbuilder, Dice, and Indeed. There are just too many scammers/bots to filter through.

    zkt on
  • The Crowing OneThe Crowing One Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    zkt wrote: »
    Volume.

    Every day go through Craigslist and other sources and send an application to every job that you seem interested in. It is not uncommon for a job search to take upwards of 12 months for a new grad with restrictions. The more resumes and applications you send out, the better chance of finding that job for you. It's really a crap-shoot: it could be the first one you send out that works out for you, or it could be the last after hundreds and hundreds of frustrations.

    So far all Ive received from Craigslist are bot replies. I still check it every day for some reason, but I mainly use Careerbuilder, Dice, and Indeed. There are just too many scammers/bots to filter through.

    Keep at it.

    My first real job after graduation took 8 months to land, and it was awesome when it came around, finally. Sending out 10 resumes and getting 9 bots is better than sending zero and having no chance of a reply.

    Really, stick with it. This sort of thing is infuriating, but it does get better as you gain more experience.

    The Crowing One on
    3rddocbottom.jpg
  • E.CoyoteE.Coyote Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Try indeed.com, monster, and craigslist. I ended up finding my current job on monster after months of not being able to find anything. Monster and indeed can sort by distance which should help you a bit.

    E.Coyote on
  • skettiosskettios Enchanted ForestRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Did you follow up with the places you applied to? This is very important.

    skettios on
  • skettiosskettios Enchanted ForestRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    E.Coyote wrote: »
    Try indeed.com, monster, and craigslist. I ended up finding my current job on monster after months of not being able to find anything. Monster and indeed can sort by distance which should help you a bit.

    This. Also, try LinkedIn.

    skettios on
  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    zkt wrote: »
    Ill try to keep this brief: I graduated almost a year and a half ago and have been unable to find work. Ive applied to Walmart, Kmart, Best Buy, and almost every other similar department store. For reasons outside of my control I cannot drive. I would prefer a job where interaction with the general public is minimum because I don't consider myself a people person. Ive gone to temp agencies and usually hear back once every 4-6 months about a position 35 miles away it would be difficult/impossible for me to commute to..or never hear from anyone at all.

    Important thing about temp agencies!
    Make sure you aren't "unwilling" to work when you legitimately turn down jobs. Especially if you already did one job for them.

    Them: You did great on that job! Want another far far away?
    You: I can't work more then x miles away since I can't (don't) drive.
    Them: Ok but we have a job that is way outside that circle!
    You: I can't take that I can't get there
    Them: Ok!

    Then they put you in an ineligible for rehire position.
    If you list them as an employer you are now basically flagged in a background investigation as "fired".
    I almost didn't get the job I have because of this... not even knowing it!

    I did temp work for over a year - loved it.
    Job ended.
    I turned down a bullshit three day thing.
    Went into ineligible for rehire pile without me knowing.
    Listed it on my resume (after all I didn't want a perceived employment gap)
    They background checked.
    They came back and said "Why were you ineligible for rehire at that place?" pretty much saying in interview language "why were you fired?"

    Luckily they were desperate for people so I got hired and still work here eight years later.
    But it was sketchy close because they were "weeding" people out since there is significant cost to bringing people on where i work (in the tens of thousands).

    useless4 on
  • KotenkKotenk Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Can you give us a general idea to your skillsets? You've named nothing but negatives so far. What are you good for?

    Kotenk on
  • zktzkt Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Got a degree in Network Administration. I have a lot of experience in using Microsoft Office. Ive mainly been applying to admin assistant positions and occasional entry level network admin positions. The few times ive gotten phone interviews for network admin positions they want someone who will be able to be on call, meaning having a reliable means of transportation.

    Also, how would I follow up on craigslist ads where they are probably going through 200 resumes? I was led to believe i shouldnt send a follow up email or thank you letter until after my first interview.

    zkt on
  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    zkt wrote: »
    Got a degree in Network Administration. I have a lot of experience in using Microsoft Office. Ive mainly been applying to admin assistant positions and occasional entry level network admin positions. The few times ive gotten phone interviews for network admin positions they want someone who will be able to be on call, meaning having a reliable means of transportation.

    Also, how would I follow up on craigslist ads where they are probably going through 200 resumes? I was led to believe i shouldnt send a follow up email or thank you letter until after my first interview.

    Okay first about craigslist.

    Unless they name their company, use an official company email, and give you a website/location of their business, do not bother applying.

    The rest are scams or people you wouldn't want to work for.

    Also - following up a 4-7 days after sending in your stuff, unless they say otherwise, is okay to do - calling even is fine.

    SkyGheNe on
  • Dyrwen66Dyrwen66 the other's insane Denver CORegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    It's perfectly alright to send a follow up email if you haven't heard anything back from the place you're applying to. Usually I wait a a week and a half before doing so, just a "Hi, I applied for a job with you, just making sure the position is still available." Give a little brief idea of your experience and abilities in like 2 sentences, and thank them for their time. Ideally you should call the location instead of email after a week or two has passed if you know someone might actually answer. This is very effective in the case of retail jobs, since you can usually get a manager on the phone and show your enthusiasm for the work they do. I've gotten plenty of jobs bugging people this way.

    With your experience, I can see how not knowing how to drive might hinder it a bit, but there are probably quite a few smaller companies that could use you too. Craigslist is great for that, and if you're applying to 10+ jobs a day no matter what, even if it's not in your preferred area, you'll definitely find work. Took me about 3 months to find a job that way, and in the meantime I found maybe 2 other jobs that I just about got to hire me. Definitely becomes a pain in the ass process, but so long as you're good about finding locales within bus range (assuming you live with public transportation, since if you don't, god help you.)

    Dyrwen66 on
    Just an ancient PA person who doesn't leave the house much.
  • zktzkt Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    In that case I'd maybe be sending out 3-5 resumes a week. I rarely see any ads that aren't completely anonymous...

    I'll try calling after I've applied for Careerbuilder/Monster job ads where I know what company I'm dealing with and such. Its just impossible with Craigslist.

    zkt on
  • FeatherBladeFeatherBlade Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    How are you with setting up and maintaining websites?
    You may be able to get freelance work doing that for small local businesses.

    FeatherBlade on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • zktzkt Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I know basic HTML and can use Frontpage or Dreamweaver. Thats something I havent really considered, as I would prefer something more secure for an income source.

    zkt on
  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    SkyGheNe wrote: »
    zkt wrote: »
    Got a degree in Network Administration. I have a lot of experience in using Microsoft Office. Ive mainly been applying to admin assistant positions and occasional entry level network admin positions. The few times ive gotten phone interviews for network admin positions they want someone who will be able to be on call, meaning having a reliable means of transportation.

    Also, how would I follow up on craigslist ads where they are probably going through 200 resumes? I was led to believe i shouldnt send a follow up email or thank you letter until after my first interview.

    Okay first about craigslist.

    Unless they name their company, use an official company email, and give you a website/location of their business, do not bother applying.

    The rest are scams or people you wouldn't want to work for.

    Also - following up a 4-7 days after sending in your stuff, unless they say otherwise, is okay to do - calling even is fine.

    Wrong. A lot of places don't list because they don't want people calling them or bothering them at the office.

    Esh on
  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Where do you live?

    Thanatos on
  • zktzkt Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Chicagoland

    zkt on
  • DevnoimagDevnoimag Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    I took a course on getting a job through a local outreach program. They informed me that only 3% of people who get a job get it through websites like career builder or monster. Classifieds in the paper are only marginally better. The next tier up is to actually go to store fronts advertising that they are hiring. These are so often overlooked in our age of technology.
    By far the best way to get a job is to know someone. Use social networking sites and let your friends and family know that you are looking for a job. If they have business networking meetups in your area, meet some people there and get the word out. Another thing they recommended is getting color business cards and attaching them to your resumes. It helps you stand out from the crowd, and you can find cheap printing companies online. Hand them to anyone who will take them. I carry about twenty in my wallet, and the come in very handy.

    Devnoimag on
  • nukanuka What are circles? Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    http://www.snagajob.com/

    Just to throw in another job site for you. They sort by distance too.

    nuka on
    DS: 2667 5365 3193 | 2DS: 2852-8590-3716
  • SliderSlider Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Find some place to intern or volunteer.

    Slider on
  • LewishamLewisham Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Why can't you drive? Even excluding the fact that it's killing you from getting any job, if you do want a network admin job, then you really are going to need transport. You're never going to get a job without that.

    If it's simply financial, say "I can drive, but as a recent grad, I don't have a car. I will be using my first pay check to buy one." They may well give you an advance if you're impressive enough, or give you the job and not have you on-call for the first month.

    Lewisham on
  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Devnoimag wrote: »
    I took a course on getting a job through a local outreach program. They informed me that only 3% of people who get a job get it through websites like career builder or monster. Classifieds in the paper are only marginally better. The next tier up is to actually go to store fronts advertising that they are hiring. These are so often overlooked in our age of technology.
    By far the best way to get a job is to know someone. Use social networking sites and let your friends and family know that you are looking for a job. If they have business networking meetups in your area, meet some people there and get the word out. Another thing they recommended is getting color business cards and attaching them to your resumes. It helps you stand out from the crowd, and you can find cheap printing companies online. Hand them to anyone who will take them. I carry about twenty in my wallet, and the come in very handy.

    I'm going to call shenanigans on that 3% number. It sounds way too low. They probably toss that out to discourage people from just sitting on their asses and sending emails out.

    Esh on
  • LewishamLewisham Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    I'm going to call shenanigans on that 3% number. It sounds way too low. They probably toss that out to discourage people from just sitting on their asses and sending emails out.

    I think it's probably completely fictional, but you can see how someone might get that number. People who advertise on Dice, Monster et al. are not looking for monkey workers, they're doing skilled employment. Except skilled jobs are more often than not fulfilled by people in-house or via networking. They'll never reach those sites anyway. The last figure I heard bandied about was north of 60% for these types of jobs.

    Maybe if you roll in employment agencies that don't put jobs on these sites (you go to them, they place you) and such, you might get to something close to 3%.

    Lewisham on
  • tardcoretardcore Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    The best sites to use are:

    - Monster
    - Careerbuilder
    - Yahoo HotJobs
    - Snagajob
    - Craigslist

    Also, be sure to send cover letters with your resume. I have a few written out that I just swap some words with ones relevant to the position.

    tardcore on
  • DevnoimagDevnoimag Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Esh wrote: »
    I'm going to call shenanigans on that 3% number. It sounds way too low. They probably toss that out to discourage people from just sitting on their asses and sending emails out.
    /shrug
    That might indeed be a number they pulled out of their ass. It wouldn't surprise me overly. I can tell you from my own experience, however, that about 80% of the jobs I've gotten have come from knowing someone who worked there.

    Devnoimag on
  • FeatherBladeFeatherBlade Registered User regular
    edited June 2010
    zkt wrote: »
    I know basic HTML and can use Frontpage or Dreamweaver. Thats something I havent really considered, as I would prefer something more secure for an income source.

    Well, yes, obviously. But even insecure income is better than no income at all. *shrugs* It was an idea at any rate.

    I second the idea of walking up to the actual store fronts. Don't limit yourself to large chain stores; try small chain stores and independent retailers too.

    FeatherBlade on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • EshEsh Tending bar. FFXIV. Motorcycles. Portland, ORRegistered User regular
    edited June 2010
    Devnoimag wrote: »
    Esh wrote: »
    I'm going to call shenanigans on that 3% number. It sounds way too low. They probably toss that out to discourage people from just sitting on their asses and sending emails out.
    /shrug
    That might indeed be a number they pulled out of their ass. It wouldn't surprise me overly. I can tell you from my own experience, however, that about 80% of the jobs I've gotten have come from knowing someone who worked there.

    Oh, I'm not arguing networking. In fact, I'd say it's probably the best way to find a job, but 3% is just ridiculous. I think I've found most of my jobs through networking as well come to think of it. I have found quite a few through Craigslist as well though.

    Esh on
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