Fans in push/pull?

PirusuPirusu PierceRegistered User regular
I'm in the planning stages for my cooling solution, I've got a brand new Thermalright Venomous X, rip-roarin' and ready to keep my CPU cool.

My question is about fan poisitioning. I'd like to keep my CPU as cool as possible, and figured I'd go the good ol' Push/Pull route.

My case (The HAF 922) has a rear 120mm exhaust. Now, I know I can fit my HSF with push/pull in the case, but do I remove the rear exhaust, as the pull fan is basically the same thing? Or do I just run with a push fan, since the pull fan is already pulling air from that direction?

Can I leave both?

So many options~

Pirusu on

Posts

  • FoomyFoomy Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    exhaust fans at the rear/top of the case
    intake fans at the front/side of the case.

    this is the way that atx motherboards are designed to have air flow over them.

    as for the cpu heatsink, just leave the exhaust fan near it on, unless that heatsink has an air tunnel so every litle bit of air is getting pushed out of the case, if not by taking the case exhaust off you'll just be shooting hot air into the insides of the case.

    Foomy on
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  • PirusuPirusu Pierce Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    No, I understand all that, sorry if I was unclear. Let me see if I can demonstrate with wonderful ASCII.


    Exhaust Fan <
    Heatsink |CPU Fan pushing <

    (Arrows are direction of airflow). This is how it would be by default.

    What I would like to be doing is this:

    Exhaust Fan <
    CPU Fan Pulling | Heatsink | CPU Fan pushing <

    Is the "pull" fan too much, since it is essentially doing what the exhaust fan is already doing? They almost line up. Do I use the Pull fan, and remove the exhaust fan, or do I use both, or do I use the exhaust fan with no pull fan?

    Pirusu on
  • FoomyFoomy Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    best option is to do the exhaust<-heatsink|push fan.

    using all the fans probably wouldnt cause any problems, but it would make it noisier.

    or you can remove the exhaust fan and use the 2 fans on the heatsink but you'll need to either make(with some carboard probably) or buy some sort of cowling/tube so the air from the pulling fan on the heatsink goes right up to the case. you dont want to have that fan just trying to push some air out of the open hole as most of it wont make it out of the case. heres some ascii of my own

    case wall|===cpu pulling|heatsink|spu pushing. where the ==='s would be a tube.

    hope that tube idea is making sense.

    Foomy on
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  • PirusuPirusu Pierce Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    It definitely does! Thanks. I've just been going over this stuff the past week, trying to nail down what it is I'm wanting to do (and how many fans I need to buy).

    Pirusu on
  • Macro9Macro9 Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    If you have an extra fan you could just run cpu tests and measure the temps from both configurations.

    Even then I don't think the small benefits you would get from having two fans on your heatsink would outweigh the negatives in noise levels and power usage. That may not be a big deal to you, though.

    Macro9 on
    bO0v7.png
  • FatsFats Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Pirusu wrote: »
    Exhaust Fan <
    CPU Fan Pulling | Heatsink | CPU Fan pushing <

    This is how mine is set up. I really don't think it makes a difference, but the heatsink came with both fans, so by god I'm going to use them both.

    Fats on
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