Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Bleaching black clothes

SaintSaint Registered User regular
edited January 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
So I was trying to create an oragne-and-black splash design with bleach on a black t-shirt, and I was wondering how to keep it at a color because it's been about 20 minutes in and I like the shade it's at but it keeps getting lighter. Do I just pour water on it or...?

Saint on

Posts

  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited December 2010
    I think you would have to rinse it thoroughly to get the bleach out when you were ready.

    ceres on
    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • KakodaimonosKakodaimonos Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    As long as the bleach is in the fibers and not neutralized, it's going to keep bleaching out the dye and weakening the fibers.

    NEVER USE VINEGAR OR ANY OTHER ACID TO NEUTRALIZE BLEACH. It probably won't break down the hypochlorite into chlorine gas, but it will create hypochlorous acid, which is even worse for the fibers.

    You can use Bisulfite, which is usually called Anti-Chlor and can be found at dye suppliers. Use 1 ounce per 2.5 gallons of water.

    Or you can use Thiosulfate, called Bleach Stop. You need more of it than bisulfite, but you can usually find it at photography supply stores. You'll need about 1 ounce per gallon of water.

    Finally, you can use Peroxide. Probably about half a bottle or so of the 3% peroxide solutions you can buy in the stores.

    Kakodaimonos on
  • SaintSaint Registered User regular
    edited December 2010
    Well I don't have any of those things unfortunatley and no money to really speak of so I'm just going to rinse it in warm water and leave it out to dry, hopefully that does the trick, if not, then it was only a cheap black jockey shirt, so whatever

    Saint on
  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Use a more heavily diluted bleach solution that way you have more control over the reaction. I've done this before, and you just let it sit on there, until it dries, then wash it twice in cold water.

    Forbe! on
    bv2ylq8pac8s.png
  • chromdomchromdom Working on having a better attitude Oh yeah, I movedRegistered User regular
    edited January 2011
    I made this mistake years ago
    Totally ruined the shirt.

    Coincidentally, I got one a lot like this year for Christmas. So don't worry, if the shirt is ruined, you'll get one to replace it in 10-15 years

    chromdom on
    New out of context sig?
  • SaintSaint Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Forbe! wrote: »
    Use a more heavily diluted bleach solution that way you have more control over the reaction. I've done this before, and you just let it sit on there, until it dries, then wash it twice in cold water.

    Okay I'm doing this, hope I'm not too late

    Saint on
  • SaintSaint Registered User regular
    edited January 2011
    Did it, washed it, it's still wet but i felt like taking a picture of my work, and thanks to all you h/a guys for the tips

    1sHpR.png

    Saint on
Sign In or Register to comment.