Help me with my illustration final! (Page 2) NSFW/NSF56K to the MAX

Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
edited May 2013 in Artist's Corner
Hey, I'm in school, and I'm doing stuff. Here is the stuff that I am doing.

DSC00799.jpg
Charcoal pencil on 22x36 Rives BFK, from photo

sl_01.jpg

sl_02.jpg

First and second still life paintings. Oil on 8x10 canvas board. I'll be doing at least one of these a week.

There was something important here. It's gone now.
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Posts

  • earthwormadamearthwormadam ancient crust Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    wicked awesome

    looking forward too seeing more stuffs

    earthwormadam on
  • pineappleherbpineappleherb Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    so good

    pineappleherb on
  • RankenphileRankenphile Passersby were amazed by the unusually large amounts of blood.Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited February 2011
    Nice stuff.

    Avoid doing pieces where your model is hiding his/her hands, as it looks like you're avoiding drawing a tricky but important and expressive part of the body. Similarly, finish off the feet. Those are the two most avoided body parts by students, and you've got the technical skill to do them well, from what I can see - prove it. A hiring director looking at a portfolio looks for that sort of thing.

    The paintings look nice, too, but your spheres and ellipsoid shapes are a but out of whack. Be a little more careful sighting in the initial shapes and it will push your work a lot further.

    Again, nice stuff, looking forward to seeing more.

    Rankenphile on
    8406wWN.png
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Thanks, guys!

    Rankenphile: Yeah, that really wasn't best ref I could have chosen for the figure study, just the best of the photoset I was looking at. Unfinished feet wasn't a conscious decision, I just kinda ran out of time. I literally finished off the face as quickly as I could then rushed off to class. But, avoiding feet is definitely an issue I have, which is probably why I left it for last, so I'll make a point of working on them for future figure drawings.

    I'm well acquainted of my problems with the paintings. I just don't have very good brush control yet. Those are my first paintings ever, though, so I think I'm starting off on a pretty good foot.

    Nineteen Hundred on
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  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Probably the best live figure study I've done so far. 'Bout an hour.

    ifd_01.jpg

    Nineteen Hundred on
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  • PhthanoPhthano Registered User
    edited February 2011
    Damned fine work, 1900.

    Phthano on
  • GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    So pretty...

    Godfather on
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    You guys are gonna make me think I'm actually pretty good at this. Quit it.

    Nineteen Hundred on
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  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    sl_03.jpg

    11x14

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  • DeeLockDeeLock Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Hey Chris.

    Saw some stuff that I think you could easily fix with this piece to make it so much better so I did a little paintover for you.

    1900paintover.jpg

    I think you really need to pay attention to the drawing a little bit more. The tea kettle is all kinds of wonky and malformed. You need to make sure your ellipses are symmetrical and all your angles line up. Spend some more time in the planning stage and think of everything as simple shapes (cones, boxes, cylinders and spheres).

    Another huge problem is with the flow of light. I am confused as to where the light is coming from because the cast shadows are going to the right but the lightest part of the fabric is in the background on the right side of the canvas. To draw attention to the foreground and create a more believable space, make sure that the lightest part of the fabric is in the foreground. This draws the eye towards the back and establishes a feeling of atmospheric perspective in a small scale.

    I also pointed out that all your highlights are roughly the same color and value so there is not hierarchy of focal point. It flattens the space and makes everything look like it's made from the same material. Make sure you have a clear focal point in mind and stick to it. It looks like you spent the most time on the tea kettle but the lemon is clearly the focal point because it's just so bright. If you want to draw more attention to the kettle make the lemon recede into the background a little bit more, it is further from the light source anyway.

    Other things I focused on was firming up cast shadows and form shadows, don't forget everything you learn in your drawing classes, they apply to paint as well. I also payed more attention to the play of color. Your objects don't look like they belong in the same space because they don't bounce their color onto nearby objects. I added a reflected light on the kettle from the onion and added some more color from the fabric. There's color bouncing everywhere, you need to train your eye to really see it.

    Hope this was helpful. Was this piece from class or is it your homework?

    DeeLock on
  • GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I apologize if this sounds redundant to you (because i'm sure you hear it all the time at Watts), but don't forget about alternating between your cool and warm colors!

    It's a lot easier to do this in black and white, but when you throw color on top of the scheme it can be a real headache. From what i've seen how dominant your highlight color is what will really determine the temperature of the object, so make sure to establish it first before you move on.

    Godfather on
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I hear everything you're saying, Dylan. I was actually in the middle of adjusting colors and values when I ran out of time in class. That's why the flow of light is weird on the drapery. I think I'm starting to think more about the design of the painting, rather than just copying what I see. I've still got a serious problem with color adjusting, though. I don't know if I just have poor brush handling skills or what, but I have a really hard time painting over areas I've already put paint on. Makes it difficult to firm up edges, add highlights, and fix mistakes.

    Godfather: I'm at the Academy of Art, actually, not Watts. I'm not really sure what you mean about alternating warm and cool colors?

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  • GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Take a look at these color flats in this example I painted

    http://img156.imageshack.us/f/25098272.jpg/

    Open it up in photoshop and run the eyedropper tool over each different value. The brightest value is white with a hint of yellow, the next one a light gray with a hint of blue, the next gray with a hint of red, etc.


    Warm-->Cool-->Warm-->Cool-->etc.


    Blend 'em together to get a nice variation
    79952823.jpg

    Godfather on
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Ah, I get it, but how do you decide what color you add for the variations? I'm not sure I ever see anything more than the light source color plus the color of the object.

    New from last week:

    ifd_02.jpg

    I was really happy with the sudden improvement in my rendering ability, but I don't think I like my technique anymore. It reads from a few feet away, but get up close and it just looks fuzzy and unrefined. And, I obviously need to force myself to get the whole figure down before I go in for the rendering. I had an hour, this should look more finished.

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  • TamTam Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    that head seems waaay tiny
    really like your rendering style though

    Tam on
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Yeah, it is. Not sure how that happened. I had a tendency to widen my torsos and elongate my legs. Thought I worked it out of my system, but apparently, it still pops up if I'm not careful.

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  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    New stuff

    ifd_03.jpg
    An hour, I think?

    ifd_04.jpg
    20 minutes

    ifd_05.jpg
    2, 2 and a half, it's hard to say. Kinda ran out of things to do long before the time was up.

    New paintings:

    sl_04.jpg

    sl_05.jpg

    sl_06.jpg

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  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    DSC00865.jpg

    Anyone who knows anything about plotting cast shadows wanna give me some emergency tutoring? Mostly having trouble with the armchair and the vanity, since they fall on two different surfaces and it's just confusing the hell out of me.

    Nineteen Hundred on
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  • MaydayMayday Cutting edge goblin tech Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Hey 1900! You're back from the dead... again?
    Plotting cast shadows is... fun and simple actually! http://www.idsketching.com/basic/toolbox-shadows/ Hope this helps! If not, I'll try a drawover tomorrow (2AM lolwut)

    Where the shadows meets a vertical surface, the line connecting the "base" of the light (the point on the surface under the light point) and the "base" of the point casting the shadow, has to turn straight up. Then shadow of that point is where this line meets the direction line of the light (as usual).

    Mayday on
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    Yeah, we covered that in class, and I thought I picked it up well enough, but whenever I try to apply it to anything more complicated than a cone, my brain just goes haywire. Drawover would be helpful, thanks.

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  • MaydayMayday Cutting edge goblin tech Registered User regular
    edited September 2011
    Large images ahoy!

    First - I simplified the shape greatly since I only mean to demonstrate the principle. Constructing an accurate shape of that armchair is probably gonna take quite some time!
    The black lines are the simplification, the green lines are construction lines to help us determine what is where in 3d space, and the red lines are the edges we'll be calculating the shadow for.
    http://mayday.w.staszic.waw.pl/~mayday/upload/1900/1.jpg

    Point 1 is easy: http://mayday.w.staszic.waw.pl/~mayday/upload/1900/2.jpg
    Point 2: connect the base of the point with the base of the light- where that line hits the edge between the floor and the wall- go straight up. The shadow of the point is of course on the line connecting the light and the point. http://mayday.w.staszic.waw.pl/~mayday/upload/1900/3.jpg (you'll notice I also determined where the shadow would be if there was no wall, that's needed for later).
    Point 3: same principle: http://mayday.w.staszic.waw.pl/~mayday/upload/1900/4.jpg

    Final step: connect the dots: http://mayday.w.staszic.waw.pl/~mayday/upload/1900/5.jpg
    Since both the shadows of points 2 and 3 are on the wall, you just connect them. However, the shadow of point 1 is on the floor. Draw a line between it and the point where the shadow of point 2 would be if there was no wall. Now where that line hits the floor/wall edge, turn to the shadow of point 2.

    This is basically all there is to it, as long as the walls are vertical.
    Now you need to decide how many points of that armchair you want to simulate on the shadow. Of course the more the messier the construction lines will get so it might be difficult to see what's what, but constructing shadows is basically all about determining the lines connecting shadows of any two points.

    Mayday on
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    Hey, I'm back! Again! And I've got a shitload of class drawings with me!

    First, a few things from a couple semesters ago:

    ifd_3.jpg

    ifd_1.jpg
    That's me going T_T

    ifd_2.jpg
    And this is me getting bored with drawing the model.

    This semester! Which appears to be nothing but lots and lots of clothed figure drawing.

    cfd_1.jpg

    cfd_2.jpg

    cfd_3.jpg

    cfd_4.jpg

    cfd_5.jpg

    cfd_6.jpg

    cfd_7.jpg

    cfd_8.jpg

    cfd_9.jpg

    cfd_13.jpg

    cfd_10.jpg

    cfd_11.jpg

    cfd_12.jpg

    And a couple homeworks. Tried to do each one in ten, ended up taking 45. :/

    cfd_14.jpg

    cfd_15.jpg

    One more. Finally taking a digital media class that actually requires use of a Wacom.

    CNARAIN_ILL233_class3_color_2.jpg

    And one one more. 10 minute fanart to celebrate getting access to a tablet again.

    celty.jpg

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  • GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    Woof, watch this proportions bro. It's a shame to see such polished value quality put down when things haven't been quoted off ideally yet.

    Also that last image is super neat!

  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    Yeah, direct drawing is a bitch. In previous classes, I could take time to refine and correct as I went, but in this one I have ten minutes to get everything exactly right in one go. It's tough, but I'm gonna be awesome once I'm actually able to pull it off. And thanks! Celty's a lot of fun to draw.

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  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Homework stuff:

    cfd_char_all.jpg

    cfd_char_final_nude.jpgcfd_char_final-1.jpg

    Scanned it in, so might as well:

    sketch_01.jpg

    Nineteen Hundred on
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  • NicNic Registered User regular
    I wish I could afford to go to school, or even lived near enough to take classes on the side. I dig your figures and the way you do clothing folds.
    Loving your stuff so far keep at it!

  • GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    Oh my, I guess I glazed over the part where you only had ten minutes to set up the pose! Seeing as how i'm the world's slowest artist, I don't blame you for not landing the proportions in that time frame ahaha

    I like the clean line quality! Try varying the line width from time to time, ya?

  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    Lest I just claim ownership of the doodle thread:

    poster_asari_3_pro_04.jpg

    @Angel_of_Bacon: And now?

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  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    Well now the width of her thigh is as wide as her waist, and the scale of her pelvis/ass area is still out of whack to the rest of her body, being about 15-20% too big when compared to the torso. To make it clear, the issue is not with the posing of the leg, ie: bringing the knee up to a more foreshortening like you have, it's where it is located the 2 dimensional sense that's the problem I've been trying to get at.

    Overlaying my previous drawover to this new version- see where the inner contour of the thigh is attaching to the pelvis, higher up? And how the contours of the leg/ass are brought in and up to jive with the scale? These are the things I've been talking about this whole time, but you haven't really tackled with your changes:
    1900_lady2.jpg

  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    edited March 2012
    Okay, toned down the size of the leg and reined the hip in a little more. But honestly? I kinda like how exaggerated it is. And I have seen women with proportions similar to this, so I'm not gonna stress out about it too much. On the plus side, all that leg-fixin' means I can now render legs in under 10 seconds. This isn't done by any means, but it's something I can turn in:

    poster_asari_3_color_02.jpg

    Text is a placeholder. My worry now is that the image as a whole just seems kinda boring, and I'm not sure how to fix it.

    Nineteen Hundred on
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  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    yeah, honestly, I tend to stay out of anatomy discussions cause it's a serious weak area for me, but actually I basically have the same figure bacon drew on the left in the doodle thread, so it certainly ain't unrealistic. Some people just have really deep and wide pelvises.

  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    Minor update. Adjusted colors, rendered the face a little better. Can someone tell me if her head is sitting on her neck properly? Really should have used a reference for the pose....

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  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    This is my final. Due Monday. Please help. ;_;

    ill233_final_02.jpg

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  • SeraphSwordSeraphSword Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    I should preface this by mentioning I'm no great artist myself. I'll just point out a couple things that stick out.

    Is it actually supposed to be ED 209? Because if so you really should use reference. If it's just supposed to be a walker-bot, the only thing that sticks out is that the left side doesn't seem symmetrical with the right. That may just be due to that smudgy area around the canopy though.

    Are you working on multiple layers? Like one for the background, one for the people, one for the bot? Would make fixes a lot easier. Fixes on a one layer painting are a pain.

    Not sure what else I can say to help. Perspective looks good, but you still have the grid lines poking through in some places.

    Good luck.

    SeraphSword on
    Mastery is the result of ceaseless error, combined with ruthless self-appraisal.
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    Haha, no, it's not actually ED 209. I just painted him in as I was designing him and I thought they were kinda similar.

    Update. though I don't think I have any time to keep working on it. It'll probably be turned in just like this. Bleh. Redesigned the mech using the power of perspective, adjusted a couple of things, added a foreground element.

    ill233_final_02_rev.jpg

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  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    I'm not feeling the lighting. My eye is wandering all over the drawing. I know you don't have time to rework it but if you could simplify the lighting scheme so it picked out the key elements, it would help you have a more immediately powerful impression.

    I'd do a paintover but I'm at work, sorry.

  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    Can't rework, but I can adjust. Does this help?

    ill233_final_02_rev_02.jpg

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  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    Massive head dump!

    h_h_12.jpg

    h_h_14.jpg

    h_h_13.jpg

    h_h_10.jpg

    h_h_08.jpg

    h_h_09.jpg

    h_h_11.jpg

    h_h_01.jpg

    h_h_02.jpg

    h_h_03.jpg

    h_h_04.jpg

    h_h_05.jpg

    h_h_06.jpg

    h_h_07.jpg

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    tynic
  • Nineteen HundredNineteen Hundred Registered User regular
    A few more heads, and an actual illustration.

    h_h_15.jpg

    h_h_16.jpg

    h_h_17.jpg

    person_passion.jpg

    There was something important here. It's gone now.
    tynic
  • earthwormadamearthwormadam ancient crust Registered User regular
    amazing work, I'm diggin the well roundedness of your stuffz!

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