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Jobs for a Sociology Major

Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
edited May 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
I graduated earlier this month with a Bachelor's Degree in Sociology and am in the process of looking for work. Does anyone have suggestions for entry level positions I could be applying for?

Hexmage-PA on

Posts

  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    What are you interested in? What skills do you have? Do you enjoy working with people? Don't enjoy working with people? Do you perform well under stress?

    SkyGheNe on
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    My Sociology teacher in HS said there were two options for a Soc major - teaching, or unemployed.

    So how's teaching sound? :)

    Things like marketing, advertising, or HR/recruiting would be good.

    MichaelLC on
  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    SkyGheNe wrote: »
    What are you interested in? What skills do you have? Do you enjoy working with people? Don't enjoy working with people? Do you perform well under stress?

    Here's what I've got under skills on my resume:

    - Typing speed of approximately 80 words per minute
    - Good sense of design aesthetics
    - Able to handle multiple responsibilities
    - Amicable and patient in regards to others
    - Tolerant of differing points of view
    - Familiarity with word processor programs (such as Microsoft Word)
    - Knowledge of survey research methods and experience utilizing them
    - Possessed of superb writing skills which allow information to be relayed in a clear and concise manner
    - Attentive to detail
    - Able to think critically
    - Willing to cooperate and compromise as part of a team
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    Things like marketing, advertising, or HR/recruiting would be good.

    I've already applied for a Marketing Assistant position at Fort Benning (I'm in Georgia, BTW), a Marketing and Advertising job at BCMG in Atlanta, and I just took the required test for the Juvenile Probation and Parole Specialist position last week.

    Hexmage-PA on
  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    The job market in ATL blows right now.

    What kind of actual job and internship experience do you have? That's what's going to make the difference.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • SkyGheNeSkyGheNe Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    SkyGheNe wrote: »
    What are you interested in? What skills do you have? Do you enjoy working with people? Don't enjoy working with people? Do you perform well under stress?

    Here's what I've got under skills on my resume:

    - Typing speed of approximately 80 words per minute
    - Good sense of design aesthetics
    - Able to handle multiple responsibilities
    - Amicable and patient in regards to others
    - Tolerant of differing points of view
    - Familiarity with word processor programs (such as Microsoft Word)
    - Knowledge of survey research methods and experience utilizing them
    - Possessed of superb writing skills which allow information to be relayed in a clear and concise manner
    - Attentive to detail
    - Able to think critically
    - Willing to cooperate and compromise as part of a team
    MichaelLC wrote: »
    Things like marketing, advertising, or HR/recruiting would be good.

    I've already applied for a Marketing Assistant position at Fort Benning (I'm in Georgia, BTW), a Marketing and Advertising job at BCMG in Atlanta, and I just took the required test for the Juvenile Probation and Parole Specialist position last week.

    For some of those more general skills (such as tolerant of different points of view/able to handle multiple responsibilities) - do you have work experience and examples that would show that rather than tell me? Showing me that you have good design aesthetics rather than telling would also be good as well.

    But yes, your options are mostly in administrative/teaching/communications. Right now it's getting any tangentially related experience under your belt, but I think it'll be easier to chase what you're passionate about.

    SkyGheNe on
  • LucidLucid Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    So, what areas of sociology are you interested in or pursued the most study in? I'm asking because working with immigrant/refugees might be related to certain sociological aspects. In fact, I know it does because I work with people in this regard. I don't deal directly in any format relating to sociological matters, but I am immersed in a way. I also notice lots of postings where I work for opportunities as a community worker, organizer, or whatever. Stuff related to guiding and assisting newcomer communities.

    I'm sure knowledge in social/societal aspects would provide some benefit in these types of occupations.

    Lucid on
  • EskimoDaveEskimoDave Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    My friend with a BA in Sociology has been travelling the world. Supplemented with 6 months of teaching English in Vienna and doing a year of it in Seoul.

    EskimoDave on
  • DeebaserDeebaser on my way to work in a suit and a tie Ahhhh...come on fucking guyRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Do you love soc or was it just a means to a degree?
    Unless you have a lifelong passion for sociology, learn a few things about excel/PowerPoint and go corporate. Corporate living is the tits

    Deebaser on
  • lessthanpilessthanpi MNRegistered User regular
    edited May 2011
    How's your math/stats background?

    lessthanpi on
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    You should really be working with your department's placement services, or with a professor you got along with. They're going to have the best ideas and leads, and will be able to place you somewhere with the most valuable experience.

    Also, how do you graduate with a degree without knowing what kind of job you want after?

    Darkewolfe on
    What is this I don't even.
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    I was going to say Barista, but that's just mean.

    In reality, you can apply to really any entry-level position in a corporation other than engineer or accountant. HR might be a good thing to check out. Having a degree is really all you need to get your foot in the door corp.-wise, and if you like it you'll pick up what you need along the way.

    schuss on
  • Green DreamGreen Dream Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Go government. I can only speak for the Candian Civil Service, but from what I've seen entry level positions for analysts in virtually all cases will ask for a strong background in economics, statistics, or sociology. With your BA in Soc, you'd be a prime candidate.

    The selection processses are long - anywhere from six months to three years - but, on the plus side, government's rarely go out of business and marry high job security to fairly competitive compensation (the lowest level analysts start with 46 to 50 k a year salaries up here, plus plenty of money set asside for learning opportunities and lots of room for advancement).

    I can only assume that analyst positions in U.S. Federal and State government departmetns and agencies would be similar in their basic requirements for entry-level analyst candidates - though, of course, I could be totally off base. And I have no idea what kind of compensation you'd be looking at in your State. But it may be worth checking out, as government work offers a lot of very interesting opportunities for someone interested in developing and implementing social/economic policies and programs.

    Green Dream on
  • Hexmage-PAHexmage-PA Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    The job market in ATL blows right now.

    What kind of actual job and internship experience do you have? That's what's going to make the difference.

    I don't have any internship experience. As for my previous jobs, I've worked as a stock clerk at a local grocery store, been a sales rep at a telemarketing company (I only answered incoming calls, so don't accuse me of having interrupted your dinner), performed minor maintenance work as a student worker at my college, and painted designs on tombstones for a small company called Designer Memorials.

    Deebaser wrote: »
    Do you love soc or was it just a means to a degree?
    Unless you have a lifelong passion for sociology, learn a few things about excel/PowerPoint and go corporate. Corporate living is the tits

    It was really just a means to a degree, but I did develop an interest in it along the way. I wouldn't be heartbroken if I didn't get a job directly related to sociology, though.

    lessthanpi wrote: »
    How's your math/stats background?

    Not that great. I was surprised that I passed the one statistics course I had to take. However, I did have to take two classes associated with survey research and seemed to do okay with the applications of statistics associated with it.

    Darkewolfe wrote: »
    Also, how do you graduate with a degree without knowing what kind of job you want after?

    I initially wanted to get an art related job, such as being a graphic designer or a concept artist.

    I attended the Atlanta branch of the Savannah College of Art and Design for one year. However, I transferred to another school and pursued a sociology degree. There were two primary reasons for this:

    1) SCAD is really expensive, and I was afraid I'd be in debt for the rest of my life if I stayed.
    2) Over the past few years I've become increasingly dissatisfied with my drawing and have lost a lot of the enjoyment it once gave me. I don't know if I'm really making mistakes or if I'm just imagining things (I do have an anxiety disorder, and often I won't see exactly what's wrong with a drawing but will want to erase or discard it because it just doesn't look right somehow).

    I still want to be an artist, and after a long period of not drawing at all I'm trying to get back into it. I don't think I'm talented enough yet, though, and as for now I just need to get a job so I can start paying back my bills.

    Go government. I can only speak for the Candian Civil Service, but from what I've seen entry level positions for analysts in virtually all cases will ask for a strong background in economics, statistics, or sociology. With your BA in Soc, you'd be a prime candidate.

    I think I'd prefer working for the government over a private company. I'm just having trouble finding where the jobs are at.

    Hexmage-PA on
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    for government, www.usajobs.opm.gov

    schuss on
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    If you want to go government, it is seriously the right career decision to serve in the military first. The financial perks and job perks are immense, and it is much easier to have a fed career if you're a vet.

    Darkewolfe on
    What is this I don't even.
  • VisionOfClarityVisionOfClarity Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Yea, you're going to be better off looking for internships first if you have no related experience. They will give you exp and help you make contacts. Also, AmeriCorps.

    VisionOfClarity on
  • TelexTelex Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Unfortunately with a humanities degree and the way the economy is right now, it will be difficult to pick and choose from entry level positions and will be even more difficult to find one directly related to your interests. The best thing to do is to let your network of contacts know you are looking for a job and ask them to keep you in mind if they hear anything. I was in a similar situation as you (except with an English degree) and was able to get a job because a contact happened to hear a manager mention that so-and-so was leaving and needed to be replaced, and I was able to proactively send in a resume and pursue it.

    Even if you don't think you have a "network," just mention your job search to anyone who currently works. With the job market like it is, employers can pick and choose who they interview (much less hire), and they almost always would rather interview someone recommended by a current employee rather than a stranger. And once you get into a company, you will be first to know about new job openings - So even if you stock shelves for a while, you could eventually move in to a different department, or at the very least wait out the economy for a bit while you figure out what your interests are.

    Edit: as far as government work, my girlfriend works for them and says it is difficult right now to get hired. Because of the economy people are staying in jobs they might otherwise leave, and hiring priority goes to people already employed by the gov. So just like the private sector, just try to get in any way you can and then keep your eye out for opportunities to transfer to a department closer to your interests.

    Telex on
  • LucidLucid Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    I initially wanted to get an art related job, such as being a graphic designer or a concept artist.

    I attended the Atlanta branch of the Savannah College of Art and Design for one year. However, I transferred to another school and pursued a sociology degree. There were two primary reasons for this:

    1) SCAD is really expensive, and I was afraid I'd be in debt for the rest of my life if I stayed.
    2) Over the past few years I've become increasingly dissatisfied with my drawing and have lost a lot of the enjoyment it once gave me. I don't know if I'm really making mistakes or if I'm just imagining things (I do have an anxiety disorder, and often I won't see exactly what's wrong with a drawing but will want to erase or discard it because it just doesn't look right somehow).

    I still want to be an artist, and after a long period of not drawing at all I'm trying to get back into it. I don't think I'm talented enough yet, though, and as for now I just need to get a job so I can start paying back my bills.

    I think I'd prefer working for the government over a private company. I'm just having trouble finding where the jobs are at.
    Getting into a creative career path requires a lot of sacrifice and disappointment. Often, you may have to put up with having less money, less noticeable success, and fighting for confidence on occasion. This is especially true when you're in the genesis of developing your artistic talent/ambition. You really have to be seriously committed if you want to have a creative/artistic career path. I've known quite a few people who decide to abandon it as a path in life for more financial stability(which is fine, not speaking out against that). It's important to immerse yourself in a mindset of ideas as well, this isn't limited to artistic fields but it's definitely valuable.

    I know you're not looking for more school, but Art School is(can be) beneficial in various ways in terms of talent discovery and overall creative development.

    Lucid on
  • DerrickDerrick Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    Lucid wrote: »
    Hexmage-PA wrote: »
    I initially wanted to get an art related job, such as being a graphic designer or a concept artist.

    I attended the Atlanta branch of the Savannah College of Art and Design for one year. However, I transferred to another school and pursued a sociology degree. There were two primary reasons for this:

    1) SCAD is really expensive, and I was afraid I'd be in debt for the rest of my life if I stayed.
    2) Over the past few years I've become increasingly dissatisfied with my drawing and have lost a lot of the enjoyment it once gave me. I don't know if I'm really making mistakes or if I'm just imagining things (I do have an anxiety disorder, and often I won't see exactly what's wrong with a drawing but will want to erase or discard it because it just doesn't look right somehow).

    I still want to be an artist, and after a long period of not drawing at all I'm trying to get back into it. I don't think I'm talented enough yet, though, and as for now I just need to get a job so I can start paying back my bills.

    I think I'd prefer working for the government over a private company. I'm just having trouble finding where the jobs are at.
    Getting into a creative career path requires a lot of sacrifice and disappointment. Often, you may have to put up with having less money, less noticeable success, and fighting for confidence on occasion. This is especially true when you're in the genesis of developing your artistic talent/ambition. You really have to be seriously committed if you want to have a creative/artistic career path. I've known quite a few people who decide to abandon it as a path in life for more financial stability(which is fine, not speaking out against that). It's important to immerse yourself in a mindset of ideas as well, this isn't limited to artistic fields but it's definitely valuable.

    I know you're not looking for more school, but Art School is(can be) beneficial in various ways in terms of talent discovery and overall creative development.


    It's also important to note on the art side that you don't really get what you pay for. What I mean is that you don't need to go to a really expensive school to get a great art education. I would recommend sitting in on a few classes at different places and seeing what the professor and facilities are like. However, that's more long term advice.

    Right now, I'd recommend going to a few temp agencies. It's important that you ask what the temp agencies specialize in. You don't want to be sitting around a temp agency for construction workers if you have no experience in that field. Also, you could look into print shops depending on your art skills. You don't have to be able to paint the Mona Lisa to be a great printer.

    Derrick on
    Steam and CFN: Enexemander
  • Niceguy MyeyeNiceguy Myeye Registered User regular
    edited May 2011
    My try sucking on the corporate teat by checking for jobs on the web sites for large companies based in ATL.

    These include:
    Coca Cola
    Home Depot
    UPS

    Niceguy Myeye on
  • Bianca JoBianca Jo Registered User new member
    edited February 2012
    The thing about humanities majors is that for them to really succeed after college they have to learn how to convince employers that they have actual skills. Just having a sociology degree isn't really enough to get you anywhere except maybe grad school. Sociology is such a broad discipline - a lot go into marketing and pr, but I know several sociology grads who decided to go into stuff like graphic design or software dev out of their own personal interests. Work experience matters - did you do any clubs or internships in college? Have any volunteer work? What do you actually care about enough for it to be your day job? Every college grad is fighting tooth and nail for entry level jobs - you should pick a couple of industries you find interesting and start reading into them. Don't let anyone convince you that your degree is worthless though...so many naysayers out there. there are a ton of different careers in sociology that don't necessarily relate directly to academia.

    Bianca Jo on
This discussion has been closed.