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I need to re-learn Java - any suggestions?

YallYall Registered User regular
edited November 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
So I learned Java a few years after it was released (I was taking classes in 1998). Since then my professional career, while remaining in IT, has taken me in many different directions (PM, DBA-lite, VB developer, you name it...).

Now that I'm a full time SOA architect, I feel it's more important than ever for me to have a more solid grasp on Java, since I'm basically working with developers who are using WMB, creating services, WSDL's etc. I'm not expected to know Java, but I'd like to be on a more equal footing when dealing with my team.

So what is the best approach for someone who has an ansilary knowledge of Java and hasn't had to write a line of code in 5 years? Things seem to have evolved so rapidly that I'm not even sure where to start. Spring? Struts? EJB (I've heard these have gone by the way side)?, Hibernate? I'm not even sure I could effectively navigate the IDE (all the cool kids are using Eclipse right?).

So in short, any online resources where I can begin to ramp up my knowledge would probably be where I'm looking to start. From there I can focus on integration technologies as those will have the more relevance in my day-to-day life.

I realize I've asked a lot, but any thoughts or opinions would be most appreciated (aside from "Go away and stick to COBOL old timer").

My band: https://youtu.be/rw2ersccCsQ[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
Yall on

Posts

  • RobAnybodyRobAnybody Registered User
    If you aren't very self-motivated, check out your local community college. Lots of places offer pretty solid intro courses to Java, although the books are usually unpleasantly expensive. Having to pay for the knowledge, in addition to the threat of "bad grades", helped get me moving. However, the course I took had me working in an IDE called BlueJay. It wasn't that fun.

    If you can make yourself code on a regular basis, Eclipse gives you a pretty solid IDE to play with, along with a wealth of online tutorials and a very active community. They have a whole series of videos that refresh the Java basics, in addition to teaching you how to use the tools you are given. Even if you go the CC route, I would recommend getting used to it, since it has a lot of pretty fantastic bits and pieces that help make you a better programmer.

    "When a man's hands are even with your head, his crotch is even with your teeth."
    -Ancient Dwarfish Proverb
  • YallYall Registered User regular
    Thanks Rob.

    I actually was looking at CC, but the hours weren't going to jive with my work schedule. I'll grab Eclipsevand try the tutorials.

    My band: https://youtu.be/rw2ersccCsQ[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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