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Computer upgrading: Old Motherboard and Video Card Compatibility.

zerg rushzerg rush Registered User regular
edited December 2011 in Help / Advice Forum
My current machine is an aging system with a P35-DS3P motherboard. I've got three problems

1) My current videocard (8800 GTS) is constantly overheating and I'd like to play ToR and other new games. Max graphics isn't an issue, but not getting red-screen hard crashes is important (known problem with that card). The only reason my machine isn't dead right now is that I've got a temperature monitor that auto-closes any games when I start to get around 90 degrees Celsius.

2) I don't have a lot of cash, which means I want a good deal. I want something that will last for a decent price, but I don't know what's good. Apparently a 440 GT ($70) is worse than what I already have, even though it came out 1 year ago vs 5 years for my current card (I'm confused how that is). It seems like a 550 GTX ($125) is the best bang for the buck.

3) I don't have enough money to replace my whole system in one go. I got a little windfall for christmas, so a new videocard would be nice. However, I eventually plan on replacing the motherboard/CPU, getting more RAM, etc. I need something that will work with both my current machine and a newer machine. My current machine has a PCI Express 1.0 x16 slot, but all the new ones are PCI Express 2.0. I've heard conflicting reports about compatibility, that sometimes they'll work (but be slower) and other times that BIOS's will just fail to boot. Is there a compatibility checker I can use to know for sure?

I used to be all savvy with stuff, but I haven't checked for years since I built this machine. Any other advice like things to watch out for or other cards to look at would be very welcome. Thanks in advance.

zerg rush on

Posts

  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    The vast majority of the time a board should work with a newer PCI-E card in an older slot. I am currently running a PCI-E 2.0 card in a PCI-E 1.0 slot, and it works perfectly.

    PCI-E 2.0 has twice the bandwidth of PCI-E 1.0, but unless you are planning to put a rather powerful (let's say an overclocked GTX 560Ti) in your 1.0 slot, it shouldn't throttle the card very much at all.

  • zerg rushzerg rush Registered User regular
    Gotcha. I'll check out what they have to say in that forum, and such.

    And thanks for informing me about compatibility between the two. I feel much safer knowing someone who's already done it, even if the specs say it should be fine.

  • EliminationElimination Registered User regular
    i think your biggest issue here will be if your 5 year old+ CPU will likely throttle your video card now. If you buy a 550 and plug it in you may actually see very little performance gain due to it being bottlenecked by the CPU.

    PSN: PA_Elimination 3DS: 4399-2012-1711 Steam: http://steamcommunity.com/id/TheElimination/
  • EffefEffef Who said your opinion mattered, Jones? Registered User regular
    i think your biggest issue here will be if your 5 year old+ CPU will likely throttle your video card now. If you buy a 550 and plug it in you may actually see very little performance gain due to it being bottlenecked by the CPU.

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  • RaernRaern Registered User regular
    i think your biggest issue here will be if your 5 year old+ CPU will likely throttle your video card now. If you buy a 550 and plug it in you may actually see very little performance gain due to it being bottlenecked by the CPU.

    If a game is CPU bottlenecked it usually means you're free to maximise resolution and graphics settings without loss of FPS, due to the GPU taking the load. If he's running TOR already without major framerate issues then any card upgrade will be beneficial. The fact that a faster CPU would push say, a 40-FPS CPU cap to 90-FPS won't make the game more playable, and he'll have a great card when he does find money to upgrade the rest of the system.

  • EliminationElimination Registered User regular
    Raern wrote:
    i think your biggest issue here will be if your 5 year old+ CPU will likely throttle your video card now. If you buy a 550 and plug it in you may actually see very little performance gain due to it being bottlenecked by the CPU.

    If a game is CPU bottlenecked it usually means you're free to maximise resolution and graphics settings without loss of FPS, due to the GPU taking the load. If he's running TOR already without major framerate issues then any card upgrade will be beneficial. The fact that a faster CPU would push say, a 40-FPS CPU cap to 90-FPS won't make the game more playable, and he'll have a great card when he does find money to upgrade the rest of the system.

    This is incorrect entirely. All the data must go through the CPU first before hitting the video card, the slower the CPU, the slower the FPS will go. If your CPU sucks, no amount of awesome video card will gain you more than moderate FPS. Parts need to match up in performance, or else you bottleneck, buying a super high end video card when you have a crappy CPU is a waste of money.

    PSN: PA_Elimination 3DS: 4399-2012-1711 Steam: http://steamcommunity.com/id/TheElimination/
  • RaernRaern Registered User regular
    Raern wrote:

    This is incorrect entirely. All the data must go through the CPU first before hitting the video card, the slower the CPU, the slower the FPS will go. If your CPU sucks, no amount of awesome video card will gain you more than moderate FPS. Parts need to match up in performance, or else you bottleneck, buying a super high end video card when you have a crappy CPU is a waste of money.

    I'm not sure how it's incorrect. My statement was that the CPU WILL bottleneck your FPS. However high screen resolutions, and graphical effects such as FSAA, texture filtering, lighting etcetra are 99% handled by the GPU so while the FPS may not go up, you'll be able to turn those effects up without your FPS going down.

    The goal is not to make the FPS go from playable to pointlessly fast. It's to make the game look a lot nicer. It sure beats buying a moderate graphics card now to 'match' the old CPU then upgrading both later.

  • EliminationElimination Registered User regular
    edited January 2012
    Raern wrote:
    Raern wrote:

    This is incorrect entirely. All the data must go through the CPU first before hitting the video card, the slower the CPU, the slower the FPS will go. If your CPU sucks, no amount of awesome video card will gain you more than moderate FPS. Parts need to match up in performance, or else you bottleneck, buying a super high end video card when you have a crappy CPU is a waste of money.

    I'm not sure how it's incorrect. My statement was that the CPU WILL bottleneck your FPS. However high screen resolutions, and graphical effects such as FSAA, texture filtering, lighting etcetra are 99% handled by the GPU so while the FPS may not go up, you'll be able to turn those effects up without your FPS going down.

    The goal is not to make the FPS go from playable to pointlessly fast. It's to make the game look a lot nicer. It sure beats buying a moderate graphics card now to 'match' the old CPU then upgrading both later.

    Its still incorrect though. He might see a slight boost but nothing more. He wont be able to crank anything up other than possibly the resolution due to more video memory.

    I am saying that buying a high end card is pointless if he cant utilize it properly. He is wasting his money. It seems you dont understand how a bottleneck works. So here:[url=" http://benchmarkextreme.com/Articles/CPU Bottleneck Analysis/P1.html
    "] http://benchmarkextreme.com/Articles/CPU Bottleneck Analysis/P1.html
    [/url]

    This may help you (and the op.) out in why a purchase such as the one you are suggesting would simply be wasted funds.

    For some games though, once a CPU hits the higher marks ( 3.0 and above in ghz.) it starts to depend on the game engine itself and how it utilizes each piece of hardware. In this case I can't really speak for it since I don't know the inner workings of TOR's game engine. Though I do know it isnt very intensive graphically (Not a lot of bells and whistles to turn up.)

    Personally i'd say hes already in the right mindset. Nothing higher end than a 450/550 ( which are actually very similar cards.) as any more than that is wasted potential.

    Elimination on
    PSN: PA_Elimination 3DS: 4399-2012-1711 Steam: http://steamcommunity.com/id/TheElimination/
  • BigJoe1981BigJoe1981 Registered User new member
    I have a question similar to this. I have a Gigabyte GA-H55M-S2V motherboard and my wife bought me a Radeon R7 265 graphics card for my birthday. My question is when I put the card into the mobo, all I get is a black screen. Ive put the drivers disc in and have all the drivers needed but still nothing. I know that my motherboard is an older one as I bought the PC in 2011 from newegg. So is it possible that my card just isn't compatable with my mobo?

  • HandgimpHandgimp R+L=J Family PhotoRegistered User regular
    I recommend taking this to https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/203464/pc-build-thread-come-for-advice-stay-for-the-coil-whine#latest

    The motherboard is only PCI-E 2.0, but that shouldn't be an issue for operability.

    Do you have the separate power connection to the GPU from the power supply?

    Do you have your onboard graphics disabled in the BIOS?

    PwH4Ipj.jpg
  • mRahmanimRahmani DetroitRegistered User regular
    Another question to consider is whether your PSU can support the new card or not.

    Are you getting a black screen after POST, or is there no display at all?

  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    If the current graphics card is fast enough then why not just fix the overheating issue? Clean the case, make sure the fans run and maybe arrange extra air flow through the case to help the GPU cooling. Also if the case airflow is insufficient then it will also likely be an with a new graphics card.

    Now on the new CPU being a must or not it sure depends on what the old one is, what the graphics card is and what resolution you're playing. An extreme example - I run with a five+ year old CPU, a Core i7-870, and a Fury X and the CPU is not a bottle neck since I play in 4K resolution.
    I think that often it is overlooked that unless one has a really fast graphics card and play with low to medium resolutions then only the slow CPU's are much of an bottle neck. So if one is wanting an old rig to live a bit longer often it is better to like replace the monitor or maybe add a second one.

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
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