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Is Devry worth the career?

tysonrsstysonrss Registered User regular
edited May 2012 in Help / Advice Forum
I found my way here because of a similar thread about Devry. So I decided to sign up and ask questions.

I signed up for Devry recently for Game and Simulation Programming. I've read(on this site) negative things about it.

Are there anyone here that graduated from Devry? Any tips or did you loathe it? What can the Bachelor's Degree in this field get me?

tysonrss on
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Posts

  • WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    I will say that although I've never met anyone in the games industry from Devry, that's not to say it can't happen. I will say you probably won't receive any positive attention because of the name. It doesn't have a very good reputation... nor do most 'video game' majors.

    Your best bet would be to actually show that you can do the work. Make an indie game. Make mods. Make something. Basically the more you can do to differentiate yourself.

  • tysonrsstysonrss Registered User regular
    I have experience in the inner-workings of Pokemon for GBC. I've also worked a bit with other programs like RPG Maker. Though I guess those can't really be considered.

    From what I have read from people that has taken the course, they seemed to enjoy it, and many people who has worked on something on their own time, got hired.

  • SentrySentry Registered User regular
    I am not in the computer industry, but here's my 2 cents anyway.

    You are so much better off going to a state school offering a comprehensive programming major then you are going to Devry, it's not even funny. A state school will be much cheaper, give you a wider variety of skills, and you can STILL build your portfolio while you're going there.

    Frankly, I consider Devry an in-person University of Phoenix.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • useless4useless4 Registered User regular
    Went to DeVry 10 years ago. The general ed classes (math, english etc.) were top notch... the computer classes? yea, um..

    The degree got me my job so I am not going to complain (actually last three jobs)

  • noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    Sentry wrote: »
    I am not in the computer industry, but here's my 2 cents anyway.

    You are so much better off going to a state school offering a comprehensive programming major then you are going to Devry, it's not even funny. A state school will be much cheaper, give you a wider variety of skills, and you can STILL build your portfolio while you're going there.

    Frankly, I consider Devry an in-person University of Phoenix.

    I'm not in the game industry either, but waaaay back I considered doing it. I was considering doing a program similar to DeVry, and from everything I read, talked about, like Sentry said, you'll be better of focusing on a state university and getting a computer degree than this.

    Also, make absolutely sure that you want to do this. What do you want to do in the game industry?

  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    noir_blood wrote: »
    Also, make absolutely sure that you want to do this. What do you want to do in the game industry?

    Especially if you decide to go to Devry. Devry isn't cheap. As it has been said previously, you can probably get a better degree, for cheaper at a state school if you are a resident. Plus, I'd rather go to a larger state school with a better social climate and a better opportunity to network than Devry, which is usually a commuter school.

  • tysonrsstysonrss Registered User regular
    noir_blood wrote: »
    Sentry wrote: »
    I am not in the computer industry, but here's my 2 cents anyway.

    You are so much better off going to a state school offering a comprehensive programming major then you are going to Devry, it's not even funny. A state school will be much cheaper, give you a wider variety of skills, and you can STILL build your portfolio while you're going there.

    Frankly, I consider Devry an in-person University of Phoenix.

    I'm not in the game industry either, but waaaay back I considered doing it. I was considering doing a program similar to DeVry, and from everything I read, talked about, like Sentry said, you'll be better of focusing on a state university and getting a computer degree than this.

    Also, make absolutely sure that you want to do this. What do you want to do in the game industry?

    I want to design the art and program the game. Also, at times I want to direct the game as well.

    Strange, from a lot of the testimonials there(not on that site partically)a lot of people said they enjoyed the courses. It seems like most of everyone here is against it.

    How would getting a computer degree make things better?

  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu ___________PIGEON _________San Diego, CA Registered User regular
    tysonrss wrote: »
    I want to design the art and program the game. Also, at times I want to direct the game as well.
    That's a lot of stuff for one person to handle. If you really want to be the one man indie studio, then your best bet is avoiding a degree/education all together and teaching yourself everything you need to know. Take some programming classes at a local community college or something if you can't figure things out from books. If you actually want a proper job in the industry, you can't do everything. You can only do one thing: art or programming. Or sound or whatever.

  • SarksusSarksus Registered User regular
    A computer science degree is broader, it might teach you things a more focused degree will miss. It will also be easily applicable to jobs in the industry in general. The videogame industry is really tough and the pay is not necessarily proportional to the work. You may find yourself wanting to get a comparatively cushier job for more pay programming other kinds of software. As well, I don't think a game programming degree will give you a leg up over a computer science degree.

    I think you'd have a stronger background, and save money, if you chose a state school.

    Anyway, I think your ambitions are very broad. Doing programming, art and management all at once is gonna be tough. You may want to consider learning either art or programming through school and then doing the other on the side. In a big company I'm not sure if you'll have the opportunity to utilize a broad background like that. And then in an indie dev context you will find yourself teaching yourself anyway due to a lack of resources and people.

    This advice comes from a novice, not a professional, so take it with a grain of salt, but my thoughts pretty much align with everyone else's.

  • tysonrsstysonrss Registered User regular
    Hmm...sometimes these things can be confusing.

    I thought they teach some of these thins, progamming and game design. I thought game design deals with the art side as well with other things..

  • SarksusSarksus Registered User regular
    Learning 'game design' is also problematic. It's kind of something you eventually arrive at through experience. If game design is what you want to eventually do creating your own games or designing levels for pre-existing games might get you a leg up there. I wouldn't trust classes to get you there.

  • The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    DeVry is as close as you can get to a scam without actually being one.

    The pricing structure is terrible (they're the most expensive - or were, anyway, maybe things have changed - post-secondary institute in Alberta), and their actual accreditation status is patchy at best. They also have a long history of fucking-up things like student aid, grants, direct deposit information, and the usual paperwork / bookkeeping aspects of business that you can expect a poorly run business to fuck-up.


    I would recommend looking for a different place to get your education.

    With Love and Courage
  • SentrySentry Registered User regular
    I'm just going to leave this here...
    http://www.alternet.org/economy/148021/university_of_phoenix,_devry:_scams_that_leave_you_"dumber"_and_poorer/

    the simple fact is, for-profit schools are not out to educate you. They are designed to get you as much student loan money as they can so they can take it. They have to scramble to keep their accreditation every seven years, their teaching quality sucks and their job placement rates are laughable. What makes this all the more horrifying is that you can get a better education, more applicable skills, and have a much better existence at literally ANY other state school in the country. Devry is only not a scam in that they deliver what they promise... a degree. But you'll be up to your eyeballs in debt when you graduate, to the point that an entry level position in the video game industry, which is insanely competitive and notoriously underpaid, wouldn't even begin to scratch the surface of those loans.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • tysonrsstysonrss Registered User regular
    Thanks for the link.

    So I should go for what then?

  • Twenty SidedTwenty Sided Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    DeVry is basically a diploma mill. They are not a reputable school.

    Twenty Sided on
  • SentrySentry Registered User regular
    tysonrss wrote: »
    Thanks for the link.

    So I should go for what then?

    well, I literally have no idea who you are or where you live... but I will give you generic advice I would give to any 18 year student just out of high school.
    Go to community college to get your general education requirements out of the way and figure out exactly what it is you want to do. After you've done your gen eds transfer to the best school in your state for what it is you want to do. Since you want to do game design I would focus on majors involving programming, use your gen ed requirements to learn art as much as possible, and since you seem to want to be a jack-of-all-trades when it comes to video games (which as stated earlier screams indie developer, and even those guys tend to specialize) you probably should know how to craft a story, which would be creative writing.

    but again, just my 2 cents. The best piece of advice I can give you is don't go to Devry.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    wrote:
    When I was a little kid, I always pretended I was the hero,' Skip said.
    'Fuck yeah, me too. What little kid ever pretended to be part of the lynch-mob?'
  • TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu ___________PIGEON _________San Diego, CA Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    The best advice is that if right now you're asking "what college should I go to" instead of "can you guys play this game I've made" then you should stay the hell away from the game industry and do anything else with your life. Just because you like playing games doesn't mean you like making games, and it's better to find out whether you enjoy making games before you commit to a degree that's good for nothing but.

    CompSci is useful for much more than game programming, though, so you can just do that I guess.

    TychoCelchuuu on
  • jungleroomxjungleroomx Allergic to whimsy Registered User regular
    tysonrss wrote: »
    Thanks for the link.

    So I should go for what then?

    First, make absolutely sure you want to go into game development.

    Second, generally speaking, a "game design" degree will net you a tester job. Most actual designers get their jobs from previous works and are promoted to a position like that after being in the industry for a while.

    Third, find out what you want to specialize in: Programming, art, level design, sound, etc. Find a degree path that will supply you with the necessary tools and skills to accomplish your task.

    Fourth, when looking at schools, don't be put off by regional accreditation: In a lot of instances, regional accreditations are actually a more difficult degree program than the national accreditation and will net you more growth (often) for less tuition money.

    Fifth, beware "specialty" schools unless you are looking at the automotive field or trade. Schools like Fullsail, UAT, DeVry, Kaplan, or anything else that have television ads during late night Adult Swim marathons should be avoided.

    Bama wrote: »
    Fencingsax wrote: »
    complacency sucks.
    It's not so bad once you get used to it.
  • punkpunk Registered User regular
    Huh, weird. I went to DeVry and with the exception of one particular professor, my experience was just fine. I didn't have any financial aid issues, either. Less than a month out of the door, I got a phone call from a local telecom that had got my information from the school...the rest is history. But maybe I'm the exception.

  • VeritasVRVeritasVR Registered User regular
    The best advice is that if right now you're asking "what college should I go to" instead of "can you guys play this game I've made" then you should stay the hell away from the game industry and do anything else with your life. Just because you like playing games doesn't mean you like making games, and it's better to find out whether you enjoy making games before you commit to a degree that's good for nothing but.

    CompSci is useful for much more than game programming, though, so you can just do that I guess.

    This.

    (Now get back to the CoH shoutcasts, you.)

    CoH_infantry.jpg
    Let 'em eat fucking pineapples!
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal Illinois???Registered User regular
    Fifth, beware "specialty" schools unless you are looking at the automotive field or trade. Schools like Fullsail, UAT, DeVry, Kaplan, or anything else that have television ads during late night Adult Swim marathons should be avoided.

    This is the only thing that needs to be said.

    For-profit career oriented colleges will saddle you with massive debt and no nothing special beyond what any other college would do to actually help you be employable, and perhaps even hurt.

    This is not to say that you cannot have a good career after going to one of these schools. I did, and have, but I know with certainty that I could have had basically the same career and had about half the student loans had I tried other things.

    If you are still very early in the process, like, first year, I would recommend, at minimum, looking into alternatives.

  • L Ron HowardL Ron Howard Registered User regular
    I'll just leave this here, because I feel it is relevant, and I love it:

    Steam
    NNID - bejamus
  • DemerdarDemerdar Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    What are your motivations and reasoning for wanting to go to the game industry?

    Demerdar on
    y6GGs3o.gif
  • noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    Right now, it sounds like you're more in love with the idea of being a 'game designer' than anything else. And hey, we all been there, but it would probably do you good to check some of the other "I want to make videogames" threads that pop up around here.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    For profit schools are never a good idea. Learn from my mistakes, don't do it.

    Ladies.
  • SarksusSarksus Registered User regular
    tysonrss wrote: »
    Thanks for the link.

    So I should go for what then?

    Well do you have a more specific idea of what you want to do? "Game design" is not something you go to school for. If you're looking for a degree to help you enter the industry then a computer science or art degree would be the way to go. Both of these degrees are very difficult and require either talent or dedication. A computer science degree will probably be the more marketable of the two. The demand for CS graduates is pretty damn high.

    I think community college is a good starting point. It's an extremely cheap way to collect credits for general education courses that are required regardless of your major. You should also find a community college that has a program that can transfer easily to the state school. Community colleges often have agreements with four-year universities that guarantee smooth credit transfers.

    Most importantly, figure out exactly what you're interested in doing and try a few courses in that vein. Try some intro CS courses, see if learning a programming language is something you can do. It's not for everyone. Also try an art course and see how you like it.

    If you still want to be a game designer then take whatever skills you learn in school and either build a portfolio of games you've made or design your own scripted levels in the Source or Unreal editors. You can start doing the first thing during school and the second thing right now if you have the drive. Making Source or Unreal mods is also a possibility.

  • tysonrsstysonrss Registered User regular
    Thanks.

    I pretty much am getting the same response. I wonder if there is a way to get the $40 fee refund. I doubt it, sounds like all they care about is money.

  • kaliyamakaliyama Registered User regular
    tysonrss wrote: »
    Thanks.

    I pretty much am getting the same response. I wonder if there is a way to get the $40 fee refund. I doubt it, sounds like all they care about is money.

    No, but you should feel that you got off easy: see, e.g. http://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/161097/cant-go-to-university-because-devry-wants-money#Item_68

    fwKS7.png?1
  • BartholamueBartholamue Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    Never mind.

    Bartholamue on
    Steam- SteveBartz Xbox Live- SteveBartz PSN Name- SteveBartz
  • tysonrsstysonrss Registered User regular
    So basically, I should do Computer science and that's all?

  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    You should make a game. Or make art. Or whatever it is you want to do. If you aren't already doing those things before you pursue your degree you will never make it anywhere in the game design industry, because there's already 20,000 people just like you who are actively doing the work they want to do in games AND pursuing their degrees.

    What is this I don't even.
  • BartholamueBartholamue Registered User regular
    edited May 2012
    tysonrss wrote: »
    So basically, I should do Computer science and that's all?

    You know, there's more to the games industry than just game designers/programmers/engine makers. There are accountants, personal relations guys, administration work, marketing, among other things. You don't necessarily have to try to do one thing to be in there. Have you considered those options as well?

    Bartholamue on
    Steam- SteveBartz Xbox Live- SteveBartz PSN Name- SteveBartz
  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    I'd actually advocate against doing computer science as a major. Take a few programming classes, but major in something else like one of the subjects Bartholamue suggested. The exception would be if you are going to a top-tier comp sci school and want to do heavy programming.

  • TheKoolEagleTheKoolEagle Registered User regular
    programming is definitely not for everyone, and I second all who say you should try to make a game. It is nothing like playing them, and an extremely competitive industry, especially for programming and art fields. There is no way to become a 'game designer' as most picture the job, I went to one of those colleges and all I got was an extremely rough outline of everything people do in the industry, all I got out of it was being a tester for 4 years then I said screw it and moved onto IT work.

    I still enjoy doing some modeling and stuff for recreation, but to get paid to do it means you need to be great at it, and you need to be extremely focused on what you do

    TheKoolEagle.png
  • OricalmOricalm MDRegistered User regular
    tysonrss wrote: »
    So basically, I should do Computer science and that's all?

    For what it's worth, game design is actually becoming a fairly popular "sub-genre" of the com sci degree. My (state) college started having a game theory/design track in computer science the year I was graduating (which made me sad since I would have loved to have taken it. They had a couple though "tracks" or specialties though, Like robotics, web & scripting, game design, etc.)

    A training class in something like flash (or the XNA stuff if you want to get more advanced) would probably give you a good taste of programming, and you would have a rough set of tools/skills to try building something. That way you could see if programming is really your forte, and it's probably something you could pick up as an elective or relatively cheap on the side.


    When you find a college, start looking into internships as soon as you are comfortable (probably sophmore or junior year). I know there were actually one or two postings for game companies in the area which shocked me. Granted, they were unpaid, but getting your foot in the door is key. Getting an internship is just good advice for anyone in college though, and the one thing I make sure to tell EVERYONE who's going into college.

  • CelestialBadgerCelestialBadger Registered User regular
    tysonrss wrote: »
    So basically, I should do Computer science and that's all?

    Do you want to be a programmer?

  • RderdallRderdall Registered User regular
    I went to DeVry for a degree in Electronics Engineering Technology, and am completely disappointed that I did. Not only do employers in the industry scoff at it as a place of education (at least they do here in Calgary), I have been paying over $500/mo for the past 8 years paying back the student loans I needed to borrow to be able to afford to go to school there. And I still have 15 months of payments left...

    My advice? Find a cheaper school.

    steam_sig.png

    Xbox Gamertag: GAMB1NO325Xi
  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    ITT is the same way. I've heard similar things to Bryant and Stratton as well.

    Ladies.
  • TejsTejs Registered User regular
    I'll also just say this:

    If you have a Computer Science / Software Engineering degree, you can make games or make business software. And people who make business software, while it might be more boring, typically work less, get paid more, and have less stress than the game programmers.

    I wanted to make games going into college, because I liked programming in high school. I spent all my time in the computer lab making things like Solitaire, small games, and even simple things like simulators (for things like Magic: The Gathering). I knew I wanted to be a programmer.

    I now work making business software, and I couldn't be happier, and have no plans of ever trying to go to a game studio. Things change over the course of college. If you are not sure what path you want to take, you really should strongly consider attending a community college to get your general requirements out of the way while you figure things out.

    Then you can decide if programming is for you, or if you want to be an artist / designer, or something else entirely.

    Also, consider that whatever you go to school for will give you marketable skills and the ability to grow; you 100% guaranteed won't be working for one company your entire life.

  • MadpoetMadpoet Registered User regular
    If you want to go to school for the games industry, go to Digipen. Devote your life to it - get to know all your professors, make sure they know you by name. If you can, get a job on campus and make sure they know you're a hard worker. Networking is 90% of getting a job in games, the other 90% is hard work. And yeah, that's 180%, because that's what kind of time you'll be putting in compared to someone making the same salary in a sane industry.
    Alternatively, do something you like and make games as a hobby - there's tons of tools to make whatever idea you have, and you never have to stay till 3am tightening up the graphics on level four unless you want to.

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