Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Replacing a Hard Drive: Bow to the new Solid State, or reliable whirly discs?

MarauderMarauder Registered User regular
So, for about the past 2 months, I have been having hard lockups on my system. At first it was just freezes, now it is accompanied by BSOD and random reboots, even when nothing more than an internet browser is running.

Drivers and self test on MOBO and Graphics card appear to be good, what leads me to suspect HDD is that its about 5 years old now and is intermittently refusing to boot to the drive.

I currently have a separate drive for a data core of 470gigs that I store everything on, as well as serves as the storage for the backup image of my system.

My current MOBO is this :
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813130275

I have SATA 3, so can definitely take advantage of the higher speed. Question I pose is, is it worth it for SSD yet? I installed a 20 gig build of Win7 for about 8 network desktops on a Intel SSD about 2 years ago, and while faster and less heat than HDD, I didnt think it was worth the money at the time (about 160$ for a 32gig). But it was company money so I didnt care.

Now I'm on a much more reduced income then I was then, trying to justify my costs on a new HDD.
This is the SSD that im currently looking at, 99$ plus 10$ off with a promo, which will cover shipping.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227791&name=Internal-SSD

Or we have old reliable whirling storage platters:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136769&name=Internal-Hard-Drives
30$ less, a little slower but still on SATA 3, but also louder and more heat.


Drive will primarily be for my Win7 build and my steam folder/planetside, which take up about 50 gigs.

Thoughts? Worth the extra 30$?

If it comes up, talk about your goals and how you plan to achieve them. It's better to hear that someone has a goal and is actively working towards them than that they are sitting at home jerking off and watching the Price Is Right.

Hopefully not at the same time.
Marauder on

Posts

  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    SSDs are more reliable than platter drives, so if that's your primary concern, then go SSD. You also get the speed increase (newer SSDs are much faster than drives that were around 2 years ago), for the trade-off of the increased price/GB.

  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    Yes it's worth the $30 for the SSD. It's not even a contest.

    A synthetic test like Passmark, while of limited utility, speaks volumes more than the data bus being rated for SATA-3.

    A more worrying aspect of your setup is that you are using that other drive for both storage and backup.

  • MarauderMarauder Registered User regular
    edited October 2012
    Well storage being locally stored music (all backed up in the Google Music Cloud), misc. drawing files, and games that I have installed locally. Nothing I cant afford to lose. Things like photos and important docs I back up on DVD. The only backup on the drive is just the Windows restore image for the primary drive. Its also less than 6 months old, only installed it after I couldn't use it in a build for my Aunt's machine. After losing enough drives over the years I have learned my lesson about storing anything of importance on a drive.

    Thanks for the link to the numbers, youre right its not even a close race. Not even same zip code.

    Marauder on
    If it comes up, talk about your goals and how you plan to achieve them. It's better to hear that someone has a goal and is actively working towards them than that they are sitting at home jerking off and watching the Price Is Right.

    Hopefully not at the same time.
  • tsmvengytsmvengy Registered User regular
    If it is just for OS and Steam and you have another drive that you store stuff on? ABSOLUTELY GET THE SSD.

    Seriously.

    steam_sig.png
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited October 2012
    If all you need is 128 GB, you really should go with the SSD.

    I mean, I've had portal media devices that size, so I can't imagine using 128 GB for a base drive--period. I'd fill it up obscenely fast and the added cost would be lost on the remaining 90% of what I have.

    If that's not a problem, you've got it set for that small a price hike. I'm using a 512 GB SSD that I only got because....it was $400 off.

    EDIT: I'd also add that the heat and sound from a WD (i.e. quality) drive are pretty much entirely irrelevant. And their reliability is still excellent, though technically inferior. You're paying for speed (and that's not a bad thing to pay for) and taking a severe penalty in real estate that you don't care about. Pull the trigger.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • MarauderMarauder Registered User regular
    Thanks for all the input guys, appreciate it. I knew that was where I wanted to go, but my poverty starved fingers needed to be coaxed out of their death grip on my wallet. But its getting more unstable as time progresses, so need to just bite the bullet. Already moved my steam folder and planetside to a backup disk so I don't have to download 70 gigs again. Comcast has been awesome about not throttling me, even though I use a ton of bandwidth working from home, but methinks they would frown on that extra load for the month.

    If it comes up, talk about your goals and how you plan to achieve them. It's better to hear that someone has a goal and is actively working towards them than that they are sitting at home jerking off and watching the Price Is Right.

    Hopefully not at the same time.
  • syndalissyndalis Getting Classy On the WallRegistered User, Loves Apple Products regular
    Best Solution is always to buy as big an SSD as you can afford to be your primary OS and applications drive, and a normal platter based drive or two to hold all your media and documents.

    There is no reason you need the speed of SSD for the music and movies, but every single app/game you own will benefit drastically.

    SW-4158-3990-6116
    Let's play Mario Kart or something...
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    An SSD is probably the best overall performance increaser you can add to your system - everything loads so much quicker.

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    An SSD is probably the best overall performance increaser you can add to your system - everything loads so much quicker.

    Only so much as a load times count--which they do. But it's probably the least efficient way to improve frames per second, for example, tied with literally sticking said money in your computer case.

    And of course, it has to be running OFF the SSD to make a difference. Stupid, I know, but you can easily forget that when you fill up.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Blegh BlughRegistered User regular
    Unreal engine games that load textures on the fly, open world sandbox games that stream everything from drive to RAM all the time are two examples of games that WILL have a nice performance upgrade. Games like gta IV and saints row 2 will get a fuckton more FPS.

    Steam: Stormwatcher | PSN: Stormwatcher33 | Switch: 5961-4777-3491
    camo_sig2.png
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    Unreal engine games that load textures on the fly, open world sandbox games that stream everything from drive to RAM all the time are two examples of games that WILL have a nice performance upgrade. Games like gta IV and saints row 2 will get a fuckton more FPS.

    That's why I said it was still a way. Just not a very effective way across contemporary games in various engines. :)

    Skyrim is a great example of this: huge areas that cache very awkwardly in the overworld, but switching over to a Crucial 512GB M4 has a pretty small benefit overall. Good for loading times though.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • acidlacedpenguinacidlacedpenguin Registered User regular
    edited October 2012
    adding an SSD to my system is the single greatest upgrade I've ever done to any machine I've ever owned. It was such a great upgrade that I budgeted money in a budget build for my parents for an SSD. At a restart my machine is back up and actually running in like 20 seconds. If I open an application it doesn't load-- it's just there ready to work. It's a magical land where everything about the computer just feels fast.

    edit: Synthesis does make a key point, the cost of the bus-pass to magic land is having the applications you want greased up residing on the SSD.

    acidlacedpenguin on
    GT: Acidboogie PSNid: AcidLacedPenguiN
    xraydog
  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Blegh BlughRegistered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Unreal engine games that load textures on the fly, open world sandbox games that stream everything from drive to RAM all the time are two examples of games that WILL have a nice performance upgrade. Games like gta IV and saints row 2 will get a fuckton more FPS.

    That's why I said it was still a way. Just not a very effective way across contemporary games in various engines. :)

    Skyrim is a great example of this: huge areas that cache very awkwardly in the overworld, but switching over to a Crucial 512GB M4 has a pretty small benefit overall. Good for loading times though.

    Yeah, I was just making an observation. It can definitely help a few select games beyond load times. But the benefit for the rest of the system as a whole is alone, IMO, worth it. After putting Win7 on an SSD, I started shutting my PC down every night before sleep. And leaving it off while I'm at work. My power bill dropped a healthy chunk of cash, the damn SSD has almost payed for itself already. Also, rebooting for updates or upgrades is just so quick.

    And GTAIV and SR2&3 games run sooooooooooooooo much better.

    I'm not disagreeing with you, BTW, just rambling about how much I love SSDs.

    Steam: Stormwatcher | PSN: Stormwatcher33 | Switch: 5961-4777-3491
    camo_sig2.png
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited October 2012
    Synthesis wrote: »
    Unreal engine games that load textures on the fly, open world sandbox games that stream everything from drive to RAM all the time are two examples of games that WILL have a nice performance upgrade. Games like gta IV and saints row 2 will get a fuckton more FPS.

    That's why I said it was still a way. Just not a very effective way across contemporary games in various engines. :)

    Skyrim is a great example of this: huge areas that cache very awkwardly in the overworld, but switching over to a Crucial 512GB M4 has a pretty small benefit overall. Good for loading times though.

    Yeah, I was just making an observation. It can definitely help a few select games beyond load times. But the benefit for the rest of the system as a whole is alone, IMO, worth it. After putting Win7 on an SSD, I started shutting my PC down every night before sleep. And leaving it off while I'm at work. My power bill dropped a healthy chunk of cash, the damn SSD has almost payed for itself already. Also, rebooting for updates or upgrades is just so quick.

    And GTAIV and SR2&3 games run sooooooooooooooo much better.

    I'm not disagreeing with you, BTW, just rambling about how much I love SSDs.

    That's fine. I'm just reminding OP that, yeah, don't expect much of an improvement everywhere else outside of loading times. Especially considering what other bottlenecks one might encounter.

    Of course, going from 17 seconds to 2 seconds for Windows 7 to boot up....really doesn't matter in the scheme of things. That's why I had to go with the 512, minimum, to be useful to myself.

    It was expensive (even $300 off), and it doesn't even compare to the two GTX470 video cards I bought to replace my two 8800GT (roughly the same cost after rebate). Not even in the same continent. I don't regret it in the least but, hey, no surprise there.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • SatsumomoSatsumomo Rated PG! Registered User regular
    Does OP's mobo support TRIM? Or is TRIM really not that necessary?

    I've been meaning to get an SSD but kinda hesitant because I'd want to upgrade to a Z77 board from my current P67.

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    I'm tempted to say, "No, not really." You can capitalize on it even with an older motherboard (like mine).

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • PhyphorPhyphor Building Planet Busters Tasting FruitRegistered User regular
    TRIM is an OS-level command, nothing to do with motherboards

    Magic Box
    Academician Prokhor "Phyphor" Zakharov, Chief Scientist of China, Provost of the University of Planet - SE++ Megagame
    Tef
  • SatsumomoSatsumomo Rated PG! Registered User regular
    Are you sure about that Phyphor? P67 boards do not support TRIM, which the Z68 addressed. Or am I victim of some marketing scheme?

  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    The drive and OS need to support TRIM. I do not think there is any motherboard (southbridge) dependency.

  • SatsumomoSatsumomo Rated PG! Registered User regular
    I love you guys, I have looked further into it and from what I now understand is that the Z68/Z77 chipsets allow for TRIM on RAID 0 arrays.

  • RobesRobes Registered User regular
    I would exercise caution and research SSD's some more. I bought a crucial M4, and myself as well as others have run into an issue with it failing horribly after a years worth of use. They issued a firmware update, it has worked for me for about a month and I'm back to the same issue. Other people updated the firmware and now their SSD is not even recognized as a hard drive. The M4 was one of the first major SSD drives though, so it is possible that newer ones are in fact more stable.

    Other SSD manufactures have their own problems as well though.

    R0bes.png
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    I've impulsed brought a SSD earlier this year and

    holy shit

    was it worth every fucking penny.

    I turn on my computer, turn around for 20 seconds, and my desktop is ready to go.

    The only downside to it is that you have to take some extra steps to insure that the stuff you're installing/downloading is going to your storage drive (if you're using a storage drive).

    Casually Hardcore on
  • AlectharAlecthar Alan Shore We're not territorial about that sort of thing, are we?Registered User regular
    TRIM support is a function that must be included on the drive, the chipset, and the OS. The OS issues the command, the SATA controller (part of the chip set) passes it through to the drive and the drive completes it. Recent Intel chip sets, including P67, support TRIM, but (as someone noted above) only Panther Point (Z77) chipsets support passing TRIM commands through to a RAID 0 array.

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    I've impulsed brought a SSD earlier this year and

    holy shit

    was it worth every fucking penny.

    I turn on my computer, turn around for 20 seconds, and my desktop is ready to go.

    The only downside to it is that you have to take some extra steps to insure that the stuff you're installing/downloading is going to your storage drive (if you're using a storage drive).

    This must be why I wasn't that enamored by my SSD. Don't get me wrong, I don't regret it at all, but it wasn't life changing at all.

    On a WD 1 TB, my PC start up took about ~6 seconds in BIOS and I would say a little under 20 to bring up Windows.

    With my Crucial M4 512, my PC takes....~6 seconds in BIOS and about 2 seconds in Windows.

    Whoop-de-fucking-do. My startup went from 26 seconds to 8 seconds. My life is complete now that I got that 18 seconds back! If I restarted my computer 20 times a day, that would make a difference, but in the mean time...

    Obviously, its worth is derived from the games I can run off the rest of that 512 GB drive. My Windows 7 Pro installation is lean enough that the booting time for applications was minimal (for example, Word 2010 took 6 seconds, now it takes 2), and while the faster file transfers are awesome, the truth is I do a lot fewer of them because I am constantly trying to keep my SSD clear (so I store and move things around between the other drives). Now, loading up Total War: Shogun 2 WAY faster? THAT'S what I fucking bought this thing for. Fuck yeah.

    The point of this? When you buy one, if you want to appreciate it fully, make sure it's big enough for your needs. And since prices are no longer obscenely ridiculous like they were for years, that's more possible than ever.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Blegh BlughRegistered User regular
    Well, you had a magical rainbow HDD mad with unicorn bones, then. I never ever had a boot-up time shorter than 2 minutes on a well "lived-in" install of any flavor of Windows, regardless of how efficient the system itself actually ran after boot. And even after reaching the desktop screen, it still took a minute or two before the PC was responsive.

    Now it takes 30 seconds overall to boot and reach desktop and be usable.

    Steam: Stormwatcher | PSN: Stormwatcher33 | Switch: 5961-4777-3491
    camo_sig2.png
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    Well, you had a magical rainbow HDD mad with unicorn bones, then. I never ever had a boot-up time shorter than 2 minutes on a well "lived-in" install of any flavor of Windows, regardless of how efficient the system itself actually ran after boot. And even after reaching the desktop screen, it still took a minute or two before the PC was responsive.

    Now it takes 30 seconds overall to boot and reach desktop and be usable.

    No, it actually sounds like you've got either a broken stopwatch or a definition of "lived in" is "extremely slow read/write speeds or with a services list two clicks long". Seriously, two fucking minutes? What are you booting, an ATM or a Mac from 1995? Also, guess what--you're computing taking "a minute or two" after booting to the desktop to be responsive? That doesn't seem normal on platter drives at all. Holy shit, one or two minutes? How did you brush that aside? "Well, computer/Windows installation is 18 months old. Looks like I need to wait 90 seconds after boot up before I can move the cursor around, or reformat."

    Seriously, unless you're exaggerating, that's fucked up. Doesn't sound it has anything to do with me having some sort of magical "mad" of unicorn bones, so much as not dipping my Western Digitals in Kentucky Fried Chicken or buying hard disc drives manufactured by Hasbro.

    EDIT: Running some tests again, I'd say SSD boot after BIOS is more like 4 seconds. That being said, one or two minutes without responding? I have a $400 HP Pavilion that boots up faster from a cold start--certainly doesn't take two minutes before I can do things!

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • Casually HardcoreCasually Hardcore Once an Asshole. Trying to be better. Registered User regular
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I've impulsed brought a SSD earlier this year and

    holy shit

    was it worth every fucking penny.

    I turn on my computer, turn around for 20 seconds, and my desktop is ready to go.

    The only downside to it is that you have to take some extra steps to insure that the stuff you're installing/downloading is going to your storage drive (if you're using a storage drive).

    This must be why I wasn't that enamored by my SSD. Don't get me wrong, I don't regret it at all, but it wasn't life changing at all.

    On a WD 1 TB, my PC start up took about ~6 seconds in BIOS and I would say a little under 20 to bring up Windows.

    With my Crucial M4 512, my PC takes....~6 seconds in BIOS and about 2 seconds in Windows.

    Whoop-de-fucking-do. My startup went from 26 seconds to 8 seconds. My life is complete now that I got that 18 seconds back! If I restarted my computer 20 times a day, that would make a difference, but in the mean time...

    Obviously, its worth is derived from the games I can run off the rest of that 512 GB drive. My Windows 7 Pro installation is lean enough that the booting time for applications was minimal (for example, Word 2010 took 6 seconds, now it takes 2), and while the faster file transfers are awesome, the truth is I do a lot fewer of them because I am constantly trying to keep my SSD clear (so I store and move things around between the other drives). Now, loading up Total War: Shogun 2 WAY faster? THAT'S what I fucking bought this thing for. Fuck yeah.

    The point of this? When you buy one, if you want to appreciate it fully, make sure it's big enough for your needs. And since prices are no longer obscenely ridiculous like they were for years, that's more possible than ever.

    Every upgrade on my computer is a huge 'Whoop-Dee-Fucking-Doo' when taken at face value.

    But when people use my computer, I always get comments of 'Holy shit this is fast.' or 'Holy shit, this game looks good!'. It's painful watching my friends play Skyrim on the Xbox, cause it loads just so damn slow and looks ugly in comparison.


  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    Synthesis wrote: »
    I've impulsed brought a SSD earlier this year and

    holy shit

    was it worth every fucking penny.

    I turn on my computer, turn around for 20 seconds, and my desktop is ready to go.

    The only downside to it is that you have to take some extra steps to insure that the stuff you're installing/downloading is going to your storage drive (if you're using a storage drive).

    This must be why I wasn't that enamored by my SSD. Don't get me wrong, I don't regret it at all, but it wasn't life changing at all.

    On a WD 1 TB, my PC start up took about ~6 seconds in BIOS and I would say a little under 20 to bring up Windows.

    With my Crucial M4 512, my PC takes....~6 seconds in BIOS and about 2 seconds in Windows.

    Whoop-de-fucking-do. My startup went from 26 seconds to 8 seconds. My life is complete now that I got that 18 seconds back! If I restarted my computer 20 times a day, that would make a difference, but in the mean time...

    Obviously, its worth is derived from the games I can run off the rest of that 512 GB drive. My Windows 7 Pro installation is lean enough that the booting time for applications was minimal (for example, Word 2010 took 6 seconds, now it takes 2), and while the faster file transfers are awesome, the truth is I do a lot fewer of them because I am constantly trying to keep my SSD clear (so I store and move things around between the other drives). Now, loading up Total War: Shogun 2 WAY faster? THAT'S what I fucking bought this thing for. Fuck yeah.

    The point of this? When you buy one, if you want to appreciate it fully, make sure it's big enough for your needs. And since prices are no longer obscenely ridiculous like they were for years, that's more possible than ever.

    Every upgrade on my computer is a huge 'Whoop-Dee-Fucking-Doo' when taken at face value.

    But when people use my computer, I always get comments of 'Holy shit this is fast.' or 'Holy shit, this game looks good!'. It's painful watching my friends play Skyrim on the Xbox, cause it loads just so damn slow and looks ugly in comparison.


    Exactly. Because you started from a much higher standard. Without your last upgrade, chances are Skyrim would still blow their minds. As it should. And quite frankly, if I didn't have my GT470 SLI, that SSD would be like...well, some metaphor involving breasts, bulls, lipstick, pigs, whatever. That's absolutely I'd recommend a GPU upgrade over an SSD personally (unless they had a good GPU...then again, if they had a decent SSD already....). You've got to know if the SSD is big enough, and you've got to know what'll work well for you. A new SSD is no more a solution for every problem than any other single upgrade.

    Though I wouldn't use Skyrim as an example...I've played it for 380 hours (actually more, if Steam is to believed) and haven't completed it. And not on purpose. My neighbors own the game on console, and they don't have this problem. At least some of that is modding though. :(

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Blegh BlughRegistered User regular
    No PCs I see anywhere are as fast to boot from an HDD as you claim to be normal, be the thing they gave me at the office or my own. Except for brand new Windows installs with nothing at all installed other than the OS itself. But tack on all the drivers for all the hardware and devices, plus useful things like dropbox and evernote and so on, and the boot got slower.

    I gave up on spending time trying to make the PC super tuned and efficient, because, fuck, it's meant to actually run programs and do things like syncing files and notes and Steam and torrents.

    Maybe it's those Creative drivers for the X-Fi, who knows? And my previous OS disk was an older 120GB 7200rpm HDD, on SATA 1 or whatever.

    Of course, it's around 30 seconds boot, now, overall, so it's good enough.

    My work-designated desktop Core2Duo actually takes close to 15 minutes before outlook 2007 is useable, but that's thanks to the shitty XP install they shoved on it. It should take very little time to boot, there is almost nothing installed in it at all.

    Steam: Stormwatcher | PSN: Stormwatcher33 | Switch: 5961-4777-3491
    camo_sig2.png
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    Odd, because I'm definitely not the most technically inclined person I know, nor do I have the faster PC (with or without a SSD). I just do basic maintenance, check my drivers, defragment (in this case, my other WD 1 TB drives) and reduce the amount of crap I have boot up (for example, I don't boot up Steam when I start up, just MSE and some EVGA software).

    Given that, by your own admission, you gave up on that (and that you moved from 2 minutes to 30 seconds from what I understand), that sounds a lot more believable than "See, with this HDD, I had to wait x minutes and that's totally normal." Having Windows 7 64-bit boot up in 20 seconds is certainly doable on a WD Caviar Black, it just helps not to have loads of shit in the way--though I should add, for specificity, it might take between 5 to 10 seconds after Windows finished booting for everything to become active (two desktop gadgets primarily). On a separate note, it takes up to a minute for volume control on my Microsoft Wireless Desktop 5000 to work, but I blame that on my old USB ports, and I'm perfectly capable of running anything else in the mean time.

    If you don't think it's worth it, that's perfectly reasonable. I only open Steam when I'm about to use it (and that's not quite fast, though not quite slow, to start up), so I barely have anything running when I start. I'm used to my PC being active immediately after my wallpaper comes up, it must just carefulness and effort. That doesn't change that a ~20 second boot up for Windows 7 on a good WD drive isn't some unicorn-powered miracle.

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    @StormWatcher I gotta think that's system setup and TSR's. My 4 year old Vista install still boots up under 20 seconds, with subsequent Outlook launching taking another 5-8 seconds to be happy. It's not on an SSD.

  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Blegh BlughRegistered User regular
    I do have like 3 or 4 HDDs plugged on (stupid thai floods making 2TB drives expensive). And Creative drivers. I don't think the little programs add up too much start up time.

    But, anyway, SDDs make boot times shorters, yes?

    Steam: Stormwatcher | PSN: Stormwatcher33 | Switch: 5961-4777-3491
    camo_sig2.png
  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    Most definitely. Even a crappy 1st gen SSD (outside of that supercheap JMicron controller they were putting on netbook SSDs back when) will give you significant boot time edge. Main hurdle is how to manage your data. If you're used to everything being on one big drive you're going to have to adjust to having a system drive (includes OS, commonly used apps you want speedy, and a scratch directory if you need such for source files for editing/manipulation) and a data drive for content and apps you don't need sped up.

    A hybrid setup where you are using a mechanical drive mainly, but a small SSD as a cache drive will also give you quick boots after the first few boots.

    If you can fit everything on the SSD then everything has lower latency opening.

    Some have reported issues with their SSDs (in this thread even), but there are some methods of failure that are just no longer relevant for SSD. There is no head to physically crash into a high speed spinning platter, since there are no heads and no platters. In my experience SSDs are much less prone to failure than mechs.



    As a side note, if you're trying to recover data from a failed drive I've found photo-rec able to pull stuff when Recuva and TestDisk said no dice.

    Edit: also seeing boundary cases (probably loss leaders) where 2 and 3 GB discs are available at pre-flood pricing, but these are usually externals where you have to crack the chassis to pull the drive if you want to use internally.

    Djeet on
  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    I do have like 3 or 4 HDDs plugged on (stupid thai floods making 2TB drives expensive). And Creative drivers. I don't think the little programs add up too much start up time.

    But, anyway, SDDs make boot times shorters, yes?

    Yes, provided you do it properly. When I first installed my Crucial M4, I was getting serious delays because my older motherboard personally did not like identifying 4 internal HDD--including the one SSD. When I removed the old Samsung, it sped up dramatically. As it happened, it had something to do with confusion over the proper boot drive that was causing separate BIOS errors glitches previously--that happens with 4-5 year old motherboards like the 780i SLI I guess. It was much slower than booting from my WD Caviar Black, even if performance was much improved once I finished boot. In my case, it was as easy as removing any one of the drives (I naturally went with the small Samsung).

    tl;dr--don't just go "Oh, guess it's just slow, too bad." Try and fix it, it's very possible something is wrong.

    Also, "cheap" HDD cradles seem to be unreliable frequently. I ended up taping my M4 to the bottom of the hard drive encasement with electrical tape >.>

    Synthesis on
    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    Velcro dots! If it's good enough for me, it's good enough for anyone! (Yes I'm a snob)

  • SynthesisSynthesis Honda Today! Registered User regular
    Velcro dots! If it's good enough for me, it's good enough for anyone! (Yes I'm a snob)

    Probably better than two strips of electrical tape.

    Orca wrote: »
    Synthesis wrote:
    Isn't "Your sarcasm makes me wet," the highest compliment an Abh can pay a human?

    Only if said Abh is a member of the nobility.
  • StormwatcherStormwatcher Blegh BlughRegistered User regular
    Luckily I have a Z68 mobo, (asus p8-Z68 v pro), so it all works very well.

    I have one 128 gb ssd with windows and a couple of games, another 128 GB ssd with more games (I couldn't resist getting a second one, i had some extra cash in hand), one 2TB drive for games, including steam.

    I had one 1.5TB drive for all the other data (user folder, pics and video files and documents and books), but it went bad (so soon...), so I had to reinstall 2 500GB HDDs I had around.

    Once prices get less horrible (it's taking a bit longer over here), I'll get a new 3 or 4 TB drive, move games over to it, and move all data to the 2TB, so I'll have "only" 2 ssds and 2 Hdds.

    I wish NAS solutions were cheaper (in brazil), then I'd just move all media over to one of them.

    Steam: Stormwatcher | PSN: Stormwatcher33 | Switch: 5961-4777-3491
    camo_sig2.png
  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    @Stormwatcher have you looked into unraid? If you're not familiar with Linux there's a bit of a learning curve, but it seems to be the best solution to have an easily expandable NAS which is what most people who are trying to store a bunch of digital media want.

Sign In or Register to comment.