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Fr+H2O NSF56k

franciumfrancium Registered User regular
edited June 2013 in Artist's Corner
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Yo, I'm just introducing myself and I heard some stuff about cool people here I guess. Here is some stuff I did.

I'm getting ready to submit applications for art school. I am curious about who(where) teaches some of the really finished styles of the pro's that post in this forum? I'm looking for direction on what I should be putting in my portfolio if I have no intention of doing "gallery work". I want to be able to draw anything, fast, like live action animation fast... But perfect.

I know when I get there I won't think it is perfection anymore, but that's when I can slow down.

Go add to The aging court battle thread!

francium on

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    WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    This is nice work for pre-art school!

    There are some great schools out there with some great teachers like Ringling (Wakkawa and my alma mater), RISD, MICA, Pratt, Calarts, etc etc etc.
    But, to let you in on a 'secret' - art school is less about the teachers and more about being in an environment with peers who push (either through competition or friendliness) to improve youself. I don't regret going to Ringling, I learned a lot and met my wife, but on a purely drawing level, if I were to do it again, I would possibly pursue something currently non traditional (or REALLY REALLY traditional depending on how you look at it) and go to an atelier. Ateliers are non accredited (IE no diploma) schools where you learn the very traditional way. Bargue drawings, figure drawings, oil paintings, still lifes. This may sooooound dull right now, but its the best way to learn quickly. You arn't going to be drawing 'live action animation fast... But perfect' unless you REALLY know your foundation stuff. Life drawing will need to be your new god.

    I don't really know my ateliers but @angelofbacon , @lyrium , and @rts should know as they all went to one.

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    NightDragonNightDragon 6th Grade Username Registered User regular
    Popping in here to agree with everything Wasser said. The downside to Ateliers is that they don't generally offer financial assistance though, but they're also much, much less expensive than art schools.

    Is animation what you want to get into? Art colleges tend to have a few departments that are known for being really good. As an example - I went to SCAD for Illustration, and I know that their Architecture major is really highly recommended. Likewise, there are certain places known for offering good animation courses. Is that what you want?

    Regardless though, learning your fundamentals (like Wasser mentioned) will benefit you a HUGE amount. Anatomy, painting, drawing, color, etc...I've seen kids in college who were graduating with very little actual skill (many of whom, I noticed, just seemed to go through the motions of their assignments, and didn't personally push themselves). On the other hand, I also saw students graduating who were absolutely amazing at what they did. Those students tended to have a lot of motivation to learn outside of the classroom, and aim high. I'd suggest you do the same! Never get complacent with your skill - there is always more to learn. Art school and ateliers can be great environments for you, but they're not a magic pill that suddenly makes you a really good artist after 4 years. That's all you. :)

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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    edited June 2013
    Well damn,
    Y'all made my day. I forgot that there was an academy not far from my house. I tried to sign up for classes today but I got there too late. 4:30pm???
    I'm not interested in animation... Yet. I just want the animators skill at drawing.

    Thanks for the encouragement,
    I guess I'll go draw some...


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    francium on
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    MuddyParasolMuddyParasol Registered User regular
    Very impressive! I really like your work, keep posting!

    The only constructive criticism I can offer is that the back of the shirt where the neck slopes into the shoulder feels "off" to me. It seems to me that the shirt is riding too high on the back of the neck.

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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    edited June 2013
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    This is pen and ink I'm doing for a project w friends. I do not have the control over the brush that I would like and it makes me feel very awkward sometimes. I guess that's why I'm not doing it digital.
    I'll post more stuff late.

    @muddyparasol, thanks. I will look at that neck shoulder thing and post any change I can make. I see it too.

    francium on
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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    edited November 2012
    404

    francium on
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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    edited June 2013
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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    edited June 2013
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    18x24 pencil on paper
    Because of the poor quality of photos I can provide, I included close ups.

    This is a work in progress, I'm going to put it away for a while to decide if I like it.
    I wouldn't mind hearing what people think good or bad.

    ...

    Is there a quicker way to lay down graphite evenly than grinding it out with a pencil? I like playing with the amount of detail pencil provides but I've never been instructed on the process to use to ensure I nail my texture values.

    I FEEL like I am getting lazy when I am not working on details because of the amount of time it takes to complete large area tones. I know it shows,
    Any advice on drawing endurance?

    -Thanks for looking
    P.s. And in advance if you leave a comment.

    francium on
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    Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator Mod Emeritus
    It's coming along pretty nicely, I'd say. If you can address the comments that Scosglen made in the doodle thread and make the arm a little less flat, (I kinda assume you just haven't gotten there yet) you'll be in good shape. :^:
    francium wrote: »
    Is there a quicker way to lay down graphite evenly than grinding it out with a pencil?

    You could try using the side of a graphite stick, or applying graphite powder with a brush or cloth. Not sure you'd necessarily want to try these things out on this drawing considering how far along it is already- it might be easier to just go ahead and finish it as you have been than throwing a new, unknown element into the mix- but it could be worth trying on future works.
    http://www.dickblick.com/products/generals-kimberly-graphite-sticks/
    http://www.dickblick.com/products/generals-powdered-graphite/

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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    I'm not sure I can fix the proportion problem mentioned in the other thread. There are indentations around the eyes from pressing to hard with the pencil. And I can't use pro white on this paper because the paper is off white.
    The arm, pants, chair seat, and drawing board are unfinished yes.

    I like powdered graphite, and the stick idea sounds like a good option for future works.

    The critique from scosglen really sunk in, I'm glad I did something this huge cause it's been years, I didn't know how much patience I had. (not enough yet :)

    Regardless of my mistakes in this drawing I feel like I've gained in observational skill. I'm starting a still life tonight so this time I will take photos of my subject so everyone can See what I'm working from.



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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    edited June 2013
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    I feel like I would like to boost some contrast but I can't decide where yet. I'm aware of the dark spot in the coffee pot grip is making that oval look all wrong... it's the curve of the glass, I'm Not sure if I want to make it make more sense to the eye or leave it.

    Take a blender stick to the whole thing or leave it all textured? Or texture more smoothly?

    Thanks for any input in advance guys.

    francium on
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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    edited June 2013
    page update!! i replaced the photo's with scans and got rid of some garbage. this'll be my dump (ive been wanting one).


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    francium on
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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    edited June 2013
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    Pencil and charcoal on toned paper 3"x4"ish


    I'm going to stop on this now because I need to work larger to address more subtle lighting +linework details.
    seeing it blown up, i notice i messed up the eyes (they are not looking at the same thing).

    francium on
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    NakedZerglingNakedZergling A more apocalyptic post apocalypse Portland OregonRegistered User regular
    I think the whites of the eyes may be a bit TOO white?

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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
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    The assignments name is "what we leave behind"

    I focused on a narrative, and a mood. I'm pleased for really the first time effing with charcoal.
    I'm still getting better at it.

    Figure studies soon!!!

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    buffylovebuffylove Registered User regular
    Dude, you've got a lot of great stuff. I like the army pages esp. You do a great job with the storytelling -- changing angles, moving closer or further away. I see a lot of artists who try doing seq art and it's all just flat. that story telling is hard to learn and you're already way ahead of the curve. Good luck!

    New story -- DUMP SITE
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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    This is a page from my sketchbook I did today. I'm finding it difficult to follow through posting even week old work because I want to rework it after the initial rush wears off.
    I want to get better, so if you pro draftsmen got tips and tricks, or drills that boost skills help a brother out. I'm active in the life drawing on campus here. I draw my friends (as seen below) even when they don't know.

    I got a huge homework piece In two weeks. It's a cityscape, and my charcoal skill has improved yay! Will show.
    Ciao

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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
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    This is some sketchbook work I just did the other day. The girls were done while a little drunk, and It had been a while since working big with a brush pen. Then the markers were added to not such great effect. So I did the second spread (disregard The word bubble it is an inside joke).

    While mica assigns me fine art I try my best to keep it looking commercial. But I don't feel like I can bring something like this to a crit.
    Do y'all think it would be a good idea to draw like this in a life drawing class? Or for homework?

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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
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    i always feel guilty for not having a better way to make photo's of my work. these are some of my homeworks from my first year at MICA. i have not taken an illustration class yet. i got life drawing out of the way, thats where the pokeball and the woman come from. and i half finished this painting using a gresaille technique i sort of winged. i get value, and i think in many aspects, or maybe just relatively i get color. but i dont get them together without a lot of work, or isolating the value first, then changing all the colors.

    tell me what you think, any advice on painting techniques? i want to speed paint in oils, but aparently thats not the same as on a tablet.

    i hope to be doing some more still life that deals with vast space, like landscapes in the near future. in part to practice atmosperic perspective, among other painting techniques.

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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
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    Did this little gresaille tonight.

    Oil paint is the hardest thing to control, it is equal parts frustration and fascination.

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    IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator Mod Emeritus
    Looks like mica is treating you well, I suggest that you try to keep life drawing classes in your schedule if you can. A class always kept me committed where open sessions I would forget to go.

    The pokeball one looks pretty messy, The textures in your larger areas of value are just too distracting. The oils are looking pretty sound, though. You seem to have some fuzzy edge work here and there, making your shapes not look quite committed to. That box the mug is sitting on, for example, I have a feeling its not supposed to be a perfect geometric object, but there isn't quite enough information to tell me what it actually is. It makes it just look like there are some wiggly edges.

    If there is one thing that mica does well, it's painting. Seek out the teachers that you respect, and I think you'll do great. I hope you keep posting!

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    franciumfrancium Registered User regular
    Thanks for the input! I'll try harder to define my edges in future paintings. The medium is troublesome to put it lightly.
    I agree about the texture in the charcoal drawings! They were 40"x25" and I just wasn't taking my time on them. I could have used charcoal powder, but speed and value became my objective in life drawing.

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    lyriumlyrium Registered User regular
    Your work is looking really nice, Francium! That still life in particular is lovely. It's awesome how you tackled the fabric and the super shiny finish on the tea set. One thing that sticks out though is the dark mug in the foreground; the drawing of it is a little iffy and it's not painted as well as the other pieces (w/r/t range of values, egdes, etc), almost like the rest was from reference but the mug was from your head.
    It sounds like you are getting frustrated with the oil paint; what is your process? Also, what colors are you using? It would be good to see the darks pushed a little bit more.
    Like Iruka said, make sure to stay diligent about your shapes! Even when it's hard because there are a million other things to think about :P
    Also that pokeball/Escher one is great :)

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