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[TRENCHES] Thursday, March 21, 2013 - Sacrifice

GethGeth LegionPerseus VeilRegistered User, Moderator, Penny Arcade Staff, Vanilla Staff vanilla
edited March 2013 in The Penny Arcade Hub
Sacrifice


Sacrifice
http://trenchescomic.com/comic/post/sacrifice

We don’t need to test.

Anonymous

I am the sole developer for an in-house fully custom CRM. It was developed by an amateur and was clunking along managing a mid-sized company’s affairs. It was undocumented, messy,  and riddled with tricky bugs. I was brought in to maintain and extend it.

The first thing I wanted to do was document it, clean it up. Nope. “That’s not what we’re paying you for” I was told. “We need you to fix the big problems and add features, and we need you to do it fast.”

Okay then.

I made a herculean effort to give every senior employee every item on their wish list, no matter how nonsensical. The timeframe I was given was something like half of what I needed to do a good job, so I half-assed it. I’d write a new feature, test it once, and call it good.

Months down the line, I’m still getting so many requests for new features and behaviour tweaks that I have absolutely no time to make sure my code works well. Occasionally, something will fail spectacularly and I’ll have to scramble to fix it. My boss will not allow me the time to slow down and do a better job, and when asked if I could have a tiny percentage of someone (anyone!)‘s time in the office so that I could have SOME kind of QA I was told that my code shouldn’t have bugs in the first place. This was accompanied with some pointed words about my upcoming personnel review. I attempted to explain that ALL software has bugs, and that QA (and documentation!) are a necessary part of the process. No joy.

The lesson here, fellow trenchermen, is twofold, number one, INSIST on the time and resources you need to do your best work. If you do not get what you require, communicate that you will not be responsible for problems down the line. Put it in writing. The second lesson is don’t work for a boss that can’t code. It sucks big fat hairy monkey balls.


Geth on

Posts

  • anonjanonj Registered User new member
    Those are pants???

    ( I guess it's not news, after rifling though a bunch of strips I found this http://trenchescomic.com/comic/post/lineage )

  • GilhelmiGilhelmi Registered User regular
    I do not like Unions. Many of them are more concerned about keeping their power and influence, then protecting the member's.

    WITH THAT SAID, stories like that are the reasons why the game industry needs a Union. Unpaid overtime should be illegal, lying to employees should be illegal, and not fulfilling a verbal contract IS illegal (but hard to prove without a full legal team that a Union can provide).

  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    I like Cora's smile in the last panel.

    Gil, the problem with a Union is game development is still perceived as desirable, so any Union will be scabbed into uselessness quickly. You need to use stories like Trenches about how grueling the work is before you can think of a Union.

  • ChamomileChamomile Registered User new member
    Cora wrote:
    It's looking good!

    Cora. How could you? You were the fight for the users person! You were the basically decent person on the cast! You were the chosen one! You were supposed to bring balance to the comic, not leave it in darkness!

  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    Gilhelmi wrote: »
    I do not like Unions. Many of them are more concerned about keeping their power and influence, then protecting the member's.

    WITH THAT SAID, stories like that are the reasons why the game industry needs a Union. Unpaid overtime should be illegal, lying to employees should be illegal, and not fulfilling a verbal contract IS illegal (but hard to prove without a full legal team that a Union can provide).
    Unpaid overtime for non-exempt employees is against labor law. I have a couple friends that have been asked at various times to "work off the clock." Some of them are job scared, so I always tell them to keep a log of every time they are asked who asked and how many hours they got. One of them got a decent amount in small claims court because he kept a log, and his log was better than "we have no knowledge of that."

  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    I like Cora's smile in the last panel.

    Gil, the problem with a Union is game development is still perceived as desirable, so any Union will be scabbed into uselessness quickly. You need to use stories like Trenches about how grueling the work is before you can think of a Union.

    Yep. As long as there are legions of starry-eyed young gamers willing to debase themselves and work for peanuts for a chance to "tighten up the graphics on level 3 a little bit," the issue of unionization is basically moot.

  • shadowaneshadowane Registered User regular
    Real Story wrote:
    You’ll need more than that, don’t you think?
    03/21/2013
    I used to work for a small game team working as … a contractor to a contractor to the people who funded the game. We were a small QA team, but we worked as hard as we could for Directors with no direction, unrealistic deadlines, no support, and dwindling budgets.

    We reached the final stretch before our target launch date and were all asked to gather into the meeting room. We were told that the team was in danger of losing funding if we didn’t meet the deadline and exceed expectations. It was suggested that we were on the verge of our product being “ship ready”, and that they couldn’t pay us any OT due to the ever shrinking budget, but if we worked really hard and shipped on time our jobs would be safe. Moreover, the Producers told us that they had gotten word that the next version would be ours if we met this one final goal, and so we started to develop those levels in good faith during down time or while blocked on our current version to be released. One of our animators couldn’t have been sleeping more than 3-4 hours a day.

    A week later, an Artist and a Producer from our team were fired to show that they meant business. They said that it was due to poor performance, but everyone knew that it was because they had voiced their concerns about the risks involved with our current trajectory.
    Before ending the meeting the higher ups that came to fire our friends said that they understood that these people were our friends, and so in order to make things right with us they wanted to show us how they take care of their own. They gave us free t-shirts that they had been given for agreeing to use a lighting engine.

    About a month before I was to be married, and about two weeks before the game was supposed to ship, I asked one of the heads of my Game Team (who was actually a direct employee of the funding group) for a week off for my wedding with a few days off for my honeymoon. He responded with “Oh, no… You’ll need more than that, don’t you think? You should take three weeks off, paid.” Ecstatic, I gladly accepted. We worked tirelessly for the next two weeks, and got the game to the state in which it needed to be to ship a day before the release date.

    That night we went to a local pub and celebrated with a makeshift release party, which was paid for entirely by our Producer and ourselves.

    The next day we came to work and were greeted by the same higher-ups that had flown in from the mother ship to tell us that they were shutting down our studio and that we were all to be laid off. They told us that they had known for months that we wouldn’t be able to secure funding, and it was really an unfortunate turn of events.

    All in all, I worked about 400 hours of unpaid overtime to release a game for which we were promised a renewed contract for a new version of said game. A while later they released our games new version’s levels that we’d been working on in our off time as their own work and didn’t give us credit for any of it.

    On the plus side, I got more than three weeks off for my wedding.

    So, this story doesn't actually make sense to me. The first paragraph mentions a QA team but then the rest says they are a development team. Does the first paragraph not relate to the rest or am I missing something?

  • PonyPony Registered User regular
    maybe cora just can't bring herself to tell them the truth

  • theResetButtontheResetButton Registered User regular
    He didn't ask for time off for his wedding until a month before it?

    Keep honking: I'm also honking.
  • RMS OceanicRMS Oceanic Registered User regular
    I knew how that story would end by the second paragraph.

    It's sad that such things are so predictable.

  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    shadowane wrote: »
    Real Story wrote:
    You’ll need more than that, don’t you think?
    03/21/2013
    I used to work for a small game team working as … a contractor to a contractor to the people who funded the game. We were a small QA team, but we worked as hard as we could for Directors with no direction, unrealistic deadlines, no support, and dwindling budgets.

    We reached the final stretch before our target launch date and were all asked to gather into the meeting room. We were told that the team was in danger of losing funding if we didn’t meet the deadline and exceed expectations. It was suggested that we were on the verge of our product being “ship ready”, and that they couldn’t pay us any OT due to the ever shrinking budget, but if we worked really hard and shipped on time our jobs would be safe. Moreover, the Producers told us that they had gotten word that the next version would be ours if we met this one final goal, and so we started to develop those levels in good faith during down time or while blocked on our current version to be released. One of our animators couldn’t have been sleeping more than 3-4 hours a day.

    A week later, an Artist and a Producer from our team were fired to show that they meant business. They said that it was due to poor performance, but everyone knew that it was because they had voiced their concerns about the risks involved with our current trajectory.
    Before ending the meeting the higher ups that came to fire our friends said that they understood that these people were our friends, and so in order to make things right with us they wanted to show us how they take care of their own. They gave us free t-shirts that they had been given for agreeing to use a lighting engine.

    About a month before I was to be married, and about two weeks before the game was supposed to ship, I asked one of the heads of my Game Team (who was actually a direct employee of the funding group) for a week off for my wedding with a few days off for my honeymoon. He responded with “Oh, no… You’ll need more than that, don’t you think? You should take three weeks off, paid.” Ecstatic, I gladly accepted. We worked tirelessly for the next two weeks, and got the game to the state in which it needed to be to ship a day before the release date.

    That night we went to a local pub and celebrated with a makeshift release party, which was paid for entirely by our Producer and ourselves.

    The next day we came to work and were greeted by the same higher-ups that had flown in from the mother ship to tell us that they were shutting down our studio and that we were all to be laid off. They told us that they had known for months that we wouldn’t be able to secure funding, and it was really an unfortunate turn of events.

    All in all, I worked about 400 hours of unpaid overtime to release a game for which we were promised a renewed contract for a new version of said game. A while later they released our games new version’s levels that we’d been working on in our off time as their own work and didn’t give us credit for any of it.

    On the plus side, I got more than three weeks off for my wedding.

    So, this story doesn't actually make sense to me. The first paragraph mentions a QA team but then the rest says they are a development team. Does the first paragraph not relate to the rest or am I missing something?

    I'm pretty sure these stories are completely made up, like parables from the bible. Allegory, you know? There's some deep shit in there.

    What is this I don't even.
  • twestermtwesterm Lewisville, TXRegistered User regular
    shadowane wrote: »
    So, this story doesn't actually make sense to me. The first paragraph mentions a QA team but then the rest says they are a development team. Does the first paragraph not relate to the rest or am I missing something?

    heh, I had to do a double take too when the story said they had to develop levels.

    In short, the guy thinks he was promised a contract but I don't think he ever was. I'm guessing he misunderstood the studio head.

  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    Darkewolfe wrote: »
    I'm pretty sure these stories are completely made up

    Sometimes I wonder.

  • HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    if that story is real why the guy didn't get a lawyer and sue is insane to me

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  • El GuacoEl Guaco Registered User regular
    Hardtarget wrote: »
    if that story is real why the guy didn't get a lawyer and sue is insane to me
    It would be an uphill battle. The original contract probably had some clause in it such that "any work you do while under our employ becomes our property". Paying enough lawyers to get a favorable ruling would leave them with little left over once the smoke cleared.

    The moral of the story here is, don't do any more work than you are contractually obligated to do. If they want more, it's time to renegotiate your contract. NEVER, and I mean NEVER, do any work based on a promise. Those studio heads knew what they were going to do from day 1 and they took advantage of them.

  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    Unpaid overtime for non-exempt employees is against labor law. I have a couple friends that have been asked at various times to "work off the clock." Some of them are job scared, so I always tell them to keep a log of every time they are asked who asked and how many hours they got. One of them got a decent amount in small claims court because he kept a log, and his log was better than "we have no knowledge of that."

    Ah, but that "non-exempt" is the killer. Thanks to the "Computer Employee Exception", tech people get screwed. As long as you're making enough (and we're not talking about six figures or anything) and you're a programmer, you get no paid overtime in the US.

    http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/fairpay/fs17e_computer.pdf

    I love that this is part of the FAIR Labor Standards Act.

    Of course, that's not necessarily "off the clock". If you're paid hourly, you still get your base pay. You just don't get overtime pay. And if your salary, you say, "Thank you sir, may I have another?"

  • dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    zepherin wrote: »
    Unpaid overtime for non-exempt employees is against labor law. I have a couple friends that have been asked at various times to "work off the clock." Some of them are job scared, so I always tell them to keep a log of every time they are asked who asked and how many hours they got. One of them got a decent amount in small claims court because he kept a log, and his log was better than "we have no knowledge of that."

    Ah, but that "non-exempt" is the killer. Thanks to the "Computer Employee Exception", tech people get screwed. As long as you're making enough (and we're not talking about six figures or anything) and you're a programmer, you get no paid overtime in the US.

    http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/fairpay/fs17e_computer.pdf

    I love that this is part of the FAIR Labor Standards Act.

    Of course, that's not necessarily "off the clock". If you're paid hourly, you still get your base pay. You just don't get overtime pay. And if you're salary, you say, "Thank you sir, may I have another?"

    dennis on
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    [quote="dennis;26181986"][quote="zepherin;26178336"]Unpaid overtime for non-exempt employees is against labor law. I have a couple friends that have been asked at various times to "work off the clock." Some of them are job scared, so I always tell them to keep a log of every time they are asked who asked and how many hours they got. One of them got a decent amount in small claims court because he kept a log, and his log was better than "we have no knowledge of that."[/quote]

    Ah, but that "non-exempt" is the killer. Thanks to the "Computer Employee Exception", tech people get screwed. As long as you're making enough (and we're not talking about six figures or anything) and you're a programmer, you get no paid overtime in the US.

    http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/fairpay/fs17e_computer.pdf

    I love that this is part of the FAIR Labor Standards Act.

    Of course, that's not necessarily "off the clock". If you're paid hourly, you still get your base pay. You just don't get overtime pay. And if your salary, you say, "Thank you sir, may I have another?"[/quote]
    True, but the guys in the tails stories are usually testers, and they generally don't meet the DOL tests for computer analyst, programmer or engineer.

    However a lot of people in entry level fields just take abuse because of being job scared. I don't necessarily blame them, but I am always a big fan of documenting incidents. "Hey clock out and start filing", write it down in a small notebook or on a calander after work. "I need you to work late tonight but we don't have any money budgeted for overtime." do the same.

    I have never seen a person regret logging those kind of transactions. If you can legally record it, even better but some states have rules against it.

    zepherin on
  • fortyforty Registered User regular
    shadowane wrote: »
    Real Story wrote:
    You’ll need more than that, don’t you think?
    03/21/2013
    I used to work for a small game team working as … a contractor to a contractor to the people who funded the game. We were a small QA team, but we worked as hard as we could for Directors with no direction, unrealistic deadlines, no support, and dwindling budgets.

    We reached the final stretch before our target launch date and were all asked to gather into the meeting room. We were told that the team was in danger of losing funding if we didn’t meet the deadline and exceed expectations. It was suggested that we were on the verge of our product being “ship ready”, and that they couldn’t pay us any OT due to the ever shrinking budget, but if we worked really hard and shipped on time our jobs would be safe. Moreover, the Producers told us that they had gotten word that the next version would be ours if we met this one final goal, and so we started to develop those levels in good faith during down time or while blocked on our current version to be released. One of our animators couldn’t have been sleeping more than 3-4 hours a day.

    A week later, an Artist and a Producer from our team were fired to show that they meant business. They said that it was due to poor performance, but everyone knew that it was because they had voiced their concerns about the risks involved with our current trajectory.
    Before ending the meeting the higher ups that came to fire our friends said that they understood that these people were our friends, and so in order to make things right with us they wanted to show us how they take care of their own. They gave us free t-shirts that they had been given for agreeing to use a lighting engine.

    About a month before I was to be married, and about two weeks before the game was supposed to ship, I asked one of the heads of my Game Team (who was actually a direct employee of the funding group) for a week off for my wedding with a few days off for my honeymoon. He responded with “Oh, no… You’ll need more than that, don’t you think? You should take three weeks off, paid.” Ecstatic, I gladly accepted. We worked tirelessly for the next two weeks, and got the game to the state in which it needed to be to ship a day before the release date.

    That night we went to a local pub and celebrated with a makeshift release party, which was paid for entirely by our Producer and ourselves.

    The next day we came to work and were greeted by the same higher-ups that had flown in from the mother ship to tell us that they were shutting down our studio and that we were all to be laid off. They told us that they had known for months that we wouldn’t be able to secure funding, and it was really an unfortunate turn of events.

    All in all, I worked about 400 hours of unpaid overtime to release a game for which we were promised a renewed contract for a new version of said game. A while later they released our games new version’s levels that we’d been working on in our off time as their own work and didn’t give us credit for any of it.

    On the plus side, I got more than three weeks off for my wedding.

    So, this story doesn't actually make sense to me. The first paragraph mentions a QA team but then the rest says they are a development team. Does the first paragraph not relate to the rest or am I missing something?
    Thank you. I was thinking the same thing when he started talking about artists and making levels and such. What kind of QA team is this?

  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    Chamomile wrote: »
    Cora wrote:
    It's looking good!

    Cora. How could you? You were the fight for the users person! You were the basically decent person on the cast! You were the chosen one! You were supposed to bring balance to the comic, not leave it in darkness!

    Anyone who thought Cora was somehow the "good" one in this cast has really not been paying any attention at all.

    "If you divide the whole world into just enemies and friends, you'll end up destroying everything" --Nausicaa of the Valley of Wind
  • HeavyPHeavyP Registered User regular
    Cambiata wrote: »
    Chamomile wrote: »
    Cora wrote:
    It's looking good!

    Cora. How could you? You were the fight for the users person! You were the basically decent person on the cast! You were the chosen one! You were supposed to bring balance to the comic, not leave it in darkness!

    Anyone who thought Cora was somehow the "good" one in this cast has really not been paying any attention at all.

    I have yet to see a "good" person in this comic. They're all pretty universally terrible, with the exception of the new girl (whom we haven't seen enough of to accurately judge.)

  • Warlock82Warlock82 Never pet a burning dog Registered User regular
    edited March 2013
    forty wrote: »
    Thank you. I was thinking the same thing when he started talking about artists and making levels and such. What kind of QA team is this?

    Quality Artists? Quiet (level) Assemblers?

    Warlock82 on
    Switch: 2143-7130-1359 | 3DS: 4983-4927-6699 | Steam: warlock82 | PSN: Warlock2282
  • ChamomileChamomile Registered User new member
    Cambiata wrote: »
    Chamomile wrote: »
    Cora wrote:
    It's looking good!

    Cora. How could you? You were the fight for the users person! You were the basically decent person on the cast! You were the chosen one! You were supposed to bring balance to the comic, not leave it in darkness!

    Anyone who thought Cora was somehow the "good" one in this cast has really not been paying any attention at all.

    I was being more than a little hyperbolic with that post. Still, the rollback plot arc set up Cora as being exactly not the kind of person who would be terrible in this way, specifically, so her response here kind of took me by surprise.

  • HenroidHenroid Mexican kicked from Immigration Thread Centrism is Racism :3Registered User regular
    He didn't ask for time off for his wedding until a month before it?

    People are fucking dumb about asking for time off and this demonstrates it. I'm shocked he got the time he did, that's unreal.

  • The Good Doctor TranThe Good Doctor Tran Registered User regular
    Early on in my (non-game) dev career my fiance and I decided we should probably do the whole marriage thing. Shortly thereafter I got a new position at a very small web dev firm. At the second interview I told the head of the company, my hypothetical new boss, that I was getting married later that year. He said yea, awesome, no big deal.

    After a six month litany of events I've decided to characterize as 'hijinks', we rolled around to the wedding week I was supposed to get off. And then I lost one day of it due to 'a pressing project we really need to have done'. Then two days. And then everything up to the wedding.

    My boss was trying to text me with questions and demands literally while I was at the altar. He was the owner and operator of the business so he doesn't get my usual benefit of the doubt that someone higher up was breathing down his neck.

    So I guess I've got two points: one, dev's a good job a few years in, generally, but goddamn if there aren't a lot of really shitty jobs that can fall between you and that promised land. Two, a lot of people are very bad at management, and those are the people who tend to become managers. Some of them eventually become executives. On the way up, these budding executives hire young men and women who remind them of themselves, back in the day. The circle of incompetence is perpetuated.

    LoL & Spiral Knights & MC & SMNC: Carrington - Origin: CarringtonPlus - Steam: skdrtran
  • brocadebrocade Registered User regular
    El Guaco wrote: »
    Hardtarget wrote: »
    if that story is real why the guy didn't get a lawyer and sue is insane to me
    It would be an uphill battle. The original contract probably had some clause in it such that "any work you do while under our employ becomes our property". Paying enough lawyers to get a favorable ruling would leave them with little left over once the smoke cleared.

    The moral of the story here is, don't do any more work than you are contractually obligated to do. If they want more, it's time to renegotiate your contract. NEVER, and I mean NEVER, do any work based on a promise. Those studio heads knew what they were going to do from day 1 and they took advantage of them.

    It actually wouldn't be an uphill battle at all. If those are the facts, the team would have a really strong case. Yes, it's practically guaranteed that their contract contained a clause classifying anything they made on the job as a work for hire. (A work for hire just means that it's your employer's property, not yours.)

    That wouldn't prevent them from recovering damages here. I can think of two ways off the top of my head -- unjust enrichment and promissory estoppel. Unjust enrichment is pretty simple -- employer got a benefit that he didn't pay for, and as such needs to compensate his former employees. (It's a bit more complicated than that to prevent random people from randomly mowing your lawn and then demanding payment, but that's the gist.)

    As for promissory estoppel, it's kind of like contract-lite, and arose under the common law for situations in which someone was a total dick but there was no legally binding contract. It happens when one party makes a promise and another party reasonably relies upon that promise and suffers some kind of detriment as a result of that reliance. (Classic case: a guy promises his brother's widow a home. She loads up her kids and possessions into a wagon, sells whatever property won't fit, and travels a great distance. She gets there, and brother decides he doesn't actually want to give it to her. She sues, he rightfully says there isn't a contract, and the judge says stop being an asshole and give her the damn house.) Here, boss promises the team a new contract if they work crazy unpaid overtime producing a product. Team reasonably relies on promise, works crazy unpaid overtime and creates product. Boss takes product, then breaks promise and fires team.

    Never assume that because your employer was the one who wrote the contract you have zero recourse if they screw you. There's a lot of things that you can contract out of, but not everything. Find a lawyer -- a lot of them will do an initial consultation for free to see if your case if worth pursuing -- and find out what your rights. Don't just roll over.

    Standard disclaimer: don't rely on random forum posts by strangers for legal advice. Talk to a lawyer.

  • brocadebrocade Registered User regular
    El Guaco wrote: »
    Hardtarget wrote: »
    if that story is real why the guy didn't get a lawyer and sue is insane to me
    It would be an uphill battle. The original contract probably had some clause in it such that "any work you do while under our employ becomes our property". Paying enough lawyers to get a favorable ruling would leave them with little left over once the smoke cleared.

    The moral of the story here is, don't do any more work than you are contractually obligated to do. If they want more, it's time to renegotiate your contract. NEVER, and I mean NEVER, do any work based on a promise. Those studio heads knew what they were going to do from day 1 and they took advantage of them.

    It actually wouldn't be an uphill battle at all. If those are the facts, the team would have a really strong case. Yes, it's practically guaranteed that their contract contained a clause classifying anything they made on the job as a work for hire. (A work for hire just means that it's your employer's property, not yours.)

    That wouldn't prevent them from recovering damages here. I can think of two ways off the top of my head -- unjust enrichment and promissory estoppel. Unjust enrichment is pretty simple -- employer got a benefit that he didn't pay for, and as such needs to compensate his former employees. (It's a bit more complicated than that to prevent random people from randomly mowing your lawn and then demanding payment, but that's the gist.)

    As for promissory estoppel, it's kind of like contract-lite, and arose under the common law for situations in which someone was a total dick but there was no legally binding contract. It happens when one party makes a promise and another party reasonably relies upon that promise and suffers some kind of detriment as a result of that reliance. (Classic case: a guy promises his brother's widow a home. She loads up her kids and possessions into a wagon, sells whatever property won't fit, and travels a great distance. She gets there, and brother decides he doesn't actually want to give it to her. She sues, he rightfully says there isn't a contract, and the judge says stop being an asshole and give her the damn house.) Here, boss promises the team a new contract if they work crazy unpaid overtime producing a product. Team reasonably relies on promise, works crazy unpaid overtime and creates product. Boss takes product, then breaks promise and fires team.

    Never assume that because your employer was the one who wrote the contract you have zero recourse if they screw you. There's a lot of things that you can contract out of, but not everything. Find a lawyer -- a lot of them will do an initial consultation for free to see if your case if worth pursuing -- and find out what your rights. Don't just roll over.

    Standard disclaimer: don't rely on random forum posts by strangers for legal advice. Talk to a lawyer.

  • RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    Henroid wrote: »
    He didn't ask for time off for his wedding until a month before it?

    People are fucking dumb about asking for time off and this demonstrates it. I'm shocked he got the time he did, that's unreal.

    Maybe the guy who gave him time off knew they were all getting fired. He could offer as much time off as he wanted then, and artificially improve morale. Bonus points if he phrases it in some supervillan-y way..."Soon you'll have all the time off you'll need! We'll be sending you on...an extensive vacation. Trust me, you'll be properly...rewarded..."


    OT: It's been asserted that most of the industry's asshattery is coming from CEOs who don't know a thing about games or coding or what they require. But what about the developers who are now those higher ups? What do they think of the whole situation? Particularly the big names who tend to weigh in on industry trends and are generally considered to be swell guys (Cliffy B., Ken Levine, GabeN)? Now, I understand this is like expecting Russel Crowe to weigh in on the working conditions of cameramen, but has anyone ever asked any of these guys about the horrible things going on under the hood?

  • JusticeforPlutoJusticeforPluto Registered User regular
    Chamomile wrote: »
    Cora wrote:
    It's looking good!

    Cora. How could you? You were the fight for the users person! You were the basically decent person on the cast! You were the chosen one! You were supposed to bring balance to the comic, not leave it in darkness!

    Cora? Decent? Miss let someone else get fired for my actions?

  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    I was wondering wen we'd find out her last name.

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