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Japanese Translation Needed

tinyfisttinyfist Registered User regular
Hoping somebody can help with translating a phrase into Japanese. It doesn't have to be an exact translation. If there's a more appropriate phrase, that would be even better.

The phrase I need help with is:

"For those who live by their values"

Any help would be appreciated!

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    garroad_rangarroad_ran Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Is there any more context for this? It would really help.

    EDIT: Without any more context, I would take a stab at translating it as 価値観を守る方へ.

    garroad_ran on
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    tinyfisttinyfist Registered User regular
    Of course, I should have put some more context up to start with. It's for a company award, but instead of a trophy, we're giving out a samurai sword and we'd like it engraved with something in Japanese that's somewhat equivalent to the phrase "For those who live by their values". Hope that makes sense.

    Thanks for the context free stabbing! What does that translate to?

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    ChrysisChrysis Registered User regular
    "To a person who protects a sense of values." Which is a fairly literal translation back into English.

    Perhaps "価値観を厳守する方へ", which is "To a person (or persons) who strictly adheres to a set of values" might be more accurate? Although I'm no expert, I'm just basing it off an example sentence in a dictionary.

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    AkilaeAkilae Registered User regular
    For some odd reason "誠" comes to mind, but that would probably be far too obscure for a non-Japanese.

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    garroad_rangarroad_ran Registered User regular
    Chrysis wrote: »
    "To a person who protects a sense of values." Which is a fairly literal translation back into English.

    Perhaps "価値観を厳守する方へ", which is "To a person (or persons) who strictly adheres to a set of values" might be more accurate? Although I'm no expert, I'm just basing it off an example sentence in a dictionary.

    I'm no expert either, but in these sentences "mamoru" (守る) does not translate into "protect," but rather "adheres to" or "abides by." My original sentence and yours are identical save for the "strictly" bit, which strikes me (again, proficient, but not a native speaker) as a tad convoluted.

    Incidentally, just in case you care, I believe 価値観 (kachikan) has a connotation of "personal values" as opposed to, say "company values" or "society's values," etc.

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    RollsavagerRollsavager Registered User regular
    Chrysis wrote: »
    "To a person who protects a sense of values." Which is a fairly literal translation back into English.

    Perhaps "価値観を厳守する方へ", which is "To a person (or persons) who strictly adheres to a set of values" might be more accurate? Although I'm no expert, I'm just basing it off an example sentence in a dictionary.

    I'm no expert either, but in these sentences "mamoru" (守る) does not translate into "protect," but rather "adheres to" or "abides by." My original sentence and yours are identical save for the "strictly" bit, which strikes me (again, proficient, but not a native speaker) as a tad convoluted.

    Incidentally, just in case you care, I believe 価値観 (kachikan) has a connotation of "personal values" as opposed to, say "company values" or "society's values," etc.

    I'm not proficient in Japanese, but that is indeed what this word means in Chinese (where it's written 價值觀).

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    AkilaeAkilae Registered User regular
    Part of the issue here is does the OP want a literal translation, or something more artistic/philosophical that carries a similar meaning?

    For example, "価値観を厳守する方へ" makes perfect sense, and could be carved into a sword.

    Or, "誠", which carries an entire philosophical/religious/historical meaning of "Wholehearted, sincere, and utter devotion to an ideal". Of course, given the historical tie with the Shinsengumi, using this particular character can be good or bad, depending on your point of view.

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    tinyfisttinyfist Registered User regular
    Thank you all for replying.

    It doesn't have to be literal. If there's a phrase or idiom that's more artistic or philosophical which carries a similar meaning, I'd love to hear those too.

    I'm not very well versed on the history of the Shinsengumi, so it may be prudent to avoid that area altogether.

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