How should I set up my computer?

vhannroyvhannroy Registered User regular
So I am moving to a new place that is smaller than my current one and I am not really sure where to set up my rig. I currently have my set up wall mounted and would like to keep it that way as I have all the hardware for it and have come to enjoy the extra space it gives me. All the mounts I have are full motion brackets so intense angles is not a issue as far as mounting goes. All 3 monitors are 22 inches across.

Below is the Current set up running eyefinity. I would not be against setting it up like this again but want to look at all options.
W3Xp0oB.jpg

One of the big problems I am facing is the new place does not have outlets on every wall. Another is that that the largest wall has a big f-ing window in it... not that that is a negative over all just in this context.

Below is the rough layout of the new room.
EDyjk5h.jpg

I was thinking of trying the layout below and building a custom desk to fit that corner but I am afraid the monitor on the right will stick out to much and that it will be to sharp of angles to view the whole screen.
kKmUgCf.jpg

Any thoughts on the matter would be appreciated.

Posts

  • Lord HomsarLord Homsar Lord of Hammers Registered User regular
    First, which way does the closet door open, and second, how bright is the room during the day?

    steam_sig.png
  • vhannroyvhannroy Registered User regular
    First, which way does the closet door open, and second, how bright is the room during the day?

    There is no closet door. I live in Alaska so it is pretty bright in the summers and really dark in the winters. The blinds mitigate any direct sunlight.

  • Lord HomsarLord Homsar Lord of Hammers Registered User regular
    Hmm... From the looks of your current setup, It looks to me that the best place would perhaps be on the right wall below the closet, barring any other unwieldy furniture. I know what you are going through, my bedroom is only 9'x9' and has a 2'x4' desk with two 22" monitors and a queen mattress blocking my closet door.

    steam_sig.png
  • ToxTox I kill threads Punch DimensionRegistered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Honestly, unless you're cool with having your back to the door (something that personally I cannot stand, it just always feels like somebody's looking over my shoulder), that layout your drew in is probably your best bet, at least for a starting point. You could maybe do the corner between the two longest walls, as long as the window is going to block direct sunlight.

    Extension cords should sufficiently solve any outlet problems you have. You can usually pull up the carpet just enough to run a good (read: with ground) extension cord just along the inside of it, then just plug it in at the nearest outlet. If you're worried about the eye sore of the cord in the outlet, just put a small table and lamp there or something.

    Tox on
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  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    How big is that closet? And are you claustrophobic?
    http://pinterest.com/shabbybeachnest/closet-desks/

    If you convert your closet to a desk area, you'll probably need a wardrobe, but I'm fairly sure IKEA has some cheap ones. Once upon a time, I had a desk that was recessed into a closet, and man was it great for getting into the zone. Some people hate that feeling though, so there's that. It also helps to be a little handy, because its best to build a U to the exact dimensions of the closet.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    I would have an electrician do a drop on the 7 foot wall. Then utilize your wall mount setup there. You can use extension cords but that looks cheap and trashy IMO. A wall drop like that is going to be under 800 bucks if an electrician does it, maybe cheaper.

  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    Hmm... From the looks of your current setup, It looks to me that the best place would perhaps be on the right wall below the closet, barring any other unwieldy furniture.

    This would be my choice also even though that is still a tight fit. The position you outlined has the monitors at much to sharp angels unless it is for some sort of 3D project where you plan to put your head inside the "box" of the monitors.

    Where is the sun shining during the day and when do you use the computer. Depending how the room is oriented in the world and possibly buildings outside casting shadows this can be important, but in general it is not recommended to be facing or facing away from windows.

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
  • vhannroyvhannroy Registered User regular
    Hmm... From the looks of your current setup, It looks to me that the best place would perhaps be on the right wall below the closet, barring any other unwieldy furniture.

    My first thought was that wall also but, I have a full size bed so if I put the computer there the bed would either be 2.5 feet between the end of the bed and the desk or I would not be able to fully open the door to the room.

    Iruka wrote: »
    How big is that closet? And are you claustrophobic?

    I actually really like that idea but, The closets are done with California closet systems so that is a no go.
    zepherin wrote: »
    I would have an electrician do a drop on the 7 foot wall. Then utilize your wall mount setup there. You can use extension cords but that looks cheap and trashy IMO. A wall drop like that is going to be under 800 bucks if an electrician does it, maybe cheaper.

    Sorry I did not give you guys all the information to start, there was a lot I was trying to convey. I am renting so I can not do any kind of major things to the house. To tell you the truth I am shocked they are letting me mount the monitors.

    The lay out of the room is that the 7 foot wall is the east wall. So it is going to get the most ammount of light in the evenings when I use the computer the most. Though again none of it will be direct light.

    Thank you for all the advise so far. If the new information gives you any ideas let me know.

  • Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Major East CoastRegistered User regular
    If it were my room, I'd put my monitors facing that giant window (view dependent) or perhaps facing the 4.5' wall.



  • ToxTox I kill threads Punch DimensionRegistered User regular
    Be very careful wall-mounting anything in an apartment. You really can't be certain how sturdy those walls are. They could have lots of holes drilled in them.

    So, yeah, definitely be careful with that.

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  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    You can also get mounts that attach to your desk. Of course, this makes the mounts you have useless. You could potentially get/build a desk with a panel in the back that could accept the mounts, but unless the arms allow for vertical motion, that would be a high and ugly panel.

    So assuming you are going to put the bed against the 4.5 foot wall (Which would leave you no space to actually access your closet?) You could also get a small corner desk for the left, bottom corner of the room. It does not seem like there's a way for you to not be squished up against your bed in some capacity.

  • chr1sh4ll3ttb3chr1sh4ll3ttb3 A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    I would have an electrician do a drop on the 7 foot wall. Then utilize your wall mount setup there. You can use extension cords but that looks cheap and trashy IMO. A wall drop like that is going to be under 800 bucks if an electrician does it, maybe cheaper.

    $800 because you don't like the look of an extension cord running around the perimeter of the room? You must have money to burn...

    Tox
  • iRevertiRevert Tactical Martha Stewart Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    Iruka wrote: »
    You can also get mounts that attach to your desk. Of course, this makes the mounts you have useless. You could potentially get/build a desk with a panel in the back that could accept the mounts, but unless the arms allow for vertical motion, that would be a high and ugly panel.

    So assuming you are going to put the bed against the 4.5 foot wall (Which would leave you no space to actually access your closet?) You could also get a small corner desk for the left, bottom corner of the room. It does not seem like there's a way for you to not be squished up against your bed in some capacity.


    Monoprice offers a bit better pricing:
    http://www.monoprice.com/products/subdepartment.asp?c_id=103&cp_id=10325&cs_id=1032511&pn=computer_accessories

    You can also find a non mounting (just a stand) for around $300 that will work as well.

    Oh and bottle of lotion next to computer in first pic?
    Claaaaaaassy

    iRevert on
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    I would have an electrician do a drop on the 7 foot wall. Then utilize your wall mount setup there. You can use extension cords but that looks cheap and trashy IMO. A wall drop like that is going to be under 800 bucks if an electrician does it, maybe cheaper.

    $800 because you don't like the look of an extension cord running around the perimeter of the room? You must have money to burn...
    No, you do an actual drop because extension coords are designed to be temporary solution. Using them permanently on this setup is not wise. He has a pretty sophisticated 3 moniter setup, which is nice, but it looks somewhere in the neighborhood of a 15-20 amp pull. 3 per monitor, plus 8-10 for PC and 2-3 for speakers and printer, or any other accessories laying around, because a power strip is going to go right on the end of that extension coord. For 15-20 amps. Now the wall receptical isn't going to be rated for 20 amps, most buildings use 12 gauge wire to recepticles, but if you plug right in it probably won't be a problem. The problem is, with an extension coord you are extending the wiring an extra 10-15 feet, which is not a good idea. It's like running your oven on an extension coord. Now that is going to be a peak draw, but you don't have that kind of setup for low power usage. As it is the wiring may not meet code for just plugging into the wall, but definately not for plugging in with an extension coord.

    It also looks like shit. Just because you can do it cheaper doesn't meen you should. Also you could convince the rental company to do a drop, it'll add slight value, and most new construction has outlets every 12 feet, and at least one on every wall.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    What zepherin is being verbose in saying is "using an extension cord for a long period of time with a PC + 3 monitor set up increases the risk of fire because of the type of wire in extension cords."

    You will burn/melt an extension cord given enough time and enough draw. It won't trip your circuit breakers because the draw is well under what the circuit can handle. But not for the gauge of wire in those cords.

    Don't use them for a permanent relocation.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
    zepherin
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    bowen wrote: »
    What zepherin is being verbose in saying is "using an extension cord for a long period of time with a PC + 3 monitor set up increases the risk of fire because of the type of wire in extension cords."

    You will burn/melt an extension cord given enough time and enough draw. It won't trip your circuit breakers because the draw is well under what the circuit can handle. But not for the gauge of wire in those cords.

    Don't use them for a permanent relocation.
    As always Bowen cutting through my diatribe to produce a tl;dr version. Much appreciated. And if yours is too long for someone, "fire bad."

    zepherin on
    bowenGreat Scott
  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    bowen wrote: »
    What zepherin is being verbose in saying is "using an extension cord for a long period of time with a PC + 3 monitor set up increases the risk of fire because of the type of wire in extension cords."

    You will burn/melt an extension cord given enough time and enough draw. It won't trip your circuit breakers because the draw is well under what the circuit can handle. But not for the gauge of wire in those cords.

    Don't use them for a permanent relocation.

    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    Short version: Commercial buildings have a heavier gauge wireing running to outlets than residential wiring.

    Long version: Most wiring to your home or apartment outlets is going to be 12 gauge (14 or 16 gauge for lights) if built recently, it may be smaller if it was built cheaply or an older building may use 14 gauge or 16 gauge wire for outlets, and connected to a 40 amp breaker. A 20 amp circuit at 12 gauge wiring can go 50 feet (there and back hense circuit) before NEC requires you go 10 gauge. In a house you are going to be looking at a 20 foot conduit run to the box (40 foot circuit), and 4 foot of coord length (8 foot circuit), so unless you are using a 1 foot extension coord, or the panel is in the room you are going to be outside of code. A commercial building like the one I'm currently in has 6 gauge and 8 gauge electrical wire connected to a 240 amp breaker. So I can run a space heater from an extension coord for years with seamingly little effect because the resistance is going to be much lower than an apartment or house, it's still not a good idea though.

    Why does this matter? Distance increases resistance, and electrical resistance causes heat.

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Why drop $100 for an extension cord when you can drop a couple more for a proper outlet? Safest, least ugly solution by far.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • BlazeFireBlazeFire Registered User regular
    Are we talking about running an entirely new circuit from the panel to this room?

  • bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    I don't think that's typical for adding an extra outlet. Granted I'm no electrician but I think they just daisy chain off an existing outlet.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • BlazeFireBlazeFire Registered User regular
    If the concern is the circuit being too long by adding an extension cord, isn't daisy chaining a new outlet going to result in the same thing?

  • IrukaIruka Registered User, Moderator mod
    It doesn't sound like adding an outlet is an option since hes renting, so I think the argument is a bit moot. The room is tiny, though, he may be able to find a power strip with a long enough cord if the desk is at the bottom left corner of the room, if the outlet is in the middle of the wall.


    Or, it may be time to opt for a fold-able cot/smaller bed. (sucks, but would make the space less cramped.

  • mightyjongyomightyjongyo Registered User regular
    I believe the larger issue is the gauge of the wire. Presumably even if they daisy chain it'll be the proper gauge at least so the OP doesnt have to worry about melting wires.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    BlazeFire wrote: »
    If the concern is the circuit being too long by adding an extension cord, isn't daisy chaining a new outlet going to result in the same thing?
    Depends, often times there is an outlet on the otherside of the wall. However that is an issue, if they pull it from the outlet in the room. I've had to put in 30 or 40 outlet drops where I work, and most of them we pulled from the otherside of a wall as opposed to an outlet in the room. The other ones we went with a new circut.

  • BlazeFireBlazeFire Registered User regular
    So then buy a 10 gauge extension cord and there will be almost no effect due to the extra length. Or as Iruka said, a power strip with a longer cord.

  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    BlazeFire wrote: »
    So then buy a 10 gauge extension cord and there will be almost no effect due to the extra length. Or as Iruka said, a power strip with a longer cord.
    Doesn't work that way, a 10 gauge extension cord will most certainly have an effect do to the extra length. Your still getting resistance, and it still causes heat. The extension cord is not going to be ok, the wiring in the wall may also not be ok.

    Extension coords cause fires.

  • BlazeFireBlazeFire Registered User regular
    My reply was meant to come after mightyjongyo's. If the new outlet was going to be daisy-chained from the same room (not through the wall like you mentioned) going with a short 10 awg extension cord seems like it would better, on a "circuit length" basis, than a new outlet that would be wired in from farther away using 12 awg.

    Anywho, as was said, since he's renting it might be hard to get a new outlet.

    I'd be tempted to put it in the bottom right corner of the room if you don't mind your back to the door. 2.5 feet between the end of the bed and the edge of the desk should be okay, no? Most of your body is underneath the desk when using it.

  • GaslightGaslight Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    BlazeFire wrote: »
    I'd be tempted to put it in the bottom right corner of the room if you don't mind your back to the door.

    So we learned nothing from Wild Bill Hickock?

    Gaslight on
    bowen wrote: »
    The bacteria in your poop exist everywhere.
    Essee
  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    Short version: Commercial buildings have a heavier gauge wireing running to outlets than residential wiring.

    Long version: Most wiring to your home or apartment outlets is going to be 12 gauge (14 or 16 gauge for lights) if built recently, it may be smaller if it was built cheaply or an older building may use 14 gauge or 16 gauge wire for outlets, and connected to a 40 amp breaker. A 20 amp circuit at 12 gauge wiring can go 50 feet (there and back hense circuit) before NEC requires you go 10 gauge. In a house you are going to be looking at a 20 foot conduit run to the box (40 foot circuit), and 4 foot of coord length (8 foot circuit), so unless you are using a 1 foot extension coord, or the panel is in the room you are going to be outside of code. A commercial building like the one I'm currently in has 6 gauge and 8 gauge electrical wire connected to a 240 amp breaker. So I can run a space heater from an extension coord for years with seamingly little effect because the resistance is going to be much lower than an apartment or house, it's still not a good idea though.

    Why does this matter? Distance increases resistance, and electrical resistance causes heat.

    Your extension cord will have 0 effect on the heat generated by the wiring in your walls. The only thing that will effect the heat generated by the wires in your walls are the amps you are pulling and the voltage used. You should be able to find out what the maximum amperage rating your outlets/buiilding wiring is set up for. It probably isn't the same number as the breaker amperage, but there must be a way to determine that number. After that you only have to worry about not going over the amperage rating for your particular extension cord. This should be written either on the cord or on the little not thingy buy the plug. As long as you are not exceeding or right at either of those numbers you are fine.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    Short version: Commercial buildings have a heavier gauge wireing running to outlets than residential wiring.

    Long version: Most wiring to your home or apartment outlets is going to be 12 gauge (14 or 16 gauge for lights) if built recently, it may be smaller if it was built cheaply or an older building may use 14 gauge or 16 gauge wire for outlets, and connected to a 40 amp breaker. A 20 amp circuit at 12 gauge wiring can go 50 feet (there and back hense circuit) before NEC requires you go 10 gauge. In a house you are going to be looking at a 20 foot conduit run to the box (40 foot circuit), and 4 foot of coord length (8 foot circuit), so unless you are using a 1 foot extension coord, or the panel is in the room you are going to be outside of code. A commercial building like the one I'm currently in has 6 gauge and 8 gauge electrical wire connected to a 240 amp breaker. So I can run a space heater from an extension coord for years with seamingly little effect because the resistance is going to be much lower than an apartment or house, it's still not a good idea though.

    Why does this matter? Distance increases resistance, and electrical resistance causes heat.

    Your extension cord will have 0 effect on the heat generated by the wiring in your walls. The only thing that will effect the heat generated by the wires in your walls are the amps you are pulling and the voltage used. You should be able to find out what the maximum amperage rating your outlets/buiilding wiring is set up for. It probably isn't the same number as the breaker amperage, but there must be a way to determine that number. After that you only have to worry about not going over the amperage rating for your particular extension cord. This should be written either on the cord or on the little not thingy buy the plug. As long as you are not exceeding or right at either of those numbers you are fine.
    Do not listen to this person. Adding 20 feet to a circuit increases the resistance of the entire circuit.

  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    Short version: Commercial buildings have a heavier gauge wireing running to outlets than residential wiring.

    Long version: Most wiring to your home or apartment outlets is going to be 12 gauge (14 or 16 gauge for lights) if built recently, it may be smaller if it was built cheaply or an older building may use 14 gauge or 16 gauge wire for outlets, and connected to a 40 amp breaker. A 20 amp circuit at 12 gauge wiring can go 50 feet (there and back hense circuit) before NEC requires you go 10 gauge. In a house you are going to be looking at a 20 foot conduit run to the box (40 foot circuit), and 4 foot of coord length (8 foot circuit), so unless you are using a 1 foot extension coord, or the panel is in the room you are going to be outside of code. A commercial building like the one I'm currently in has 6 gauge and 8 gauge electrical wire connected to a 240 amp breaker. So I can run a space heater from an extension coord for years with seamingly little effect because the resistance is going to be much lower than an apartment or house, it's still not a good idea though.

    Why does this matter? Distance increases resistance, and electrical resistance causes heat.

    Your extension cord will have 0 effect on the heat generated by the wiring in your walls. The only thing that will effect the heat generated by the wires in your walls are the amps you are pulling and the voltage used. You should be able to find out what the maximum amperage rating your outlets/buiilding wiring is set up for. It probably isn't the same number as the breaker amperage, but there must be a way to determine that number. After that you only have to worry about not going over the amperage rating for your particular extension cord. This should be written either on the cord or on the little not thingy buy the plug. As long as you are not exceeding or right at either of those numbers you are fine.
    Do not listen to this person. Adding 20 feet to a circuit increases the resistance of the entire circuit.

    Look, heat generated is not passed between an extension cord and the cabling in your wall. Think about an electrical oven. It is basically just wiring. All the way from your breaker into your oven. The wires in your oven have certain resistances and get very hot. The wires in your wall have certain resistances and do not get hot. There is no heat transfer between them. Increasing the resistance of the circuit does NOT mean you are increasing the heat generated at every point in the circuit, unless there is facile heat transfer everywhere.

    edit- also wiring has ratings for a reason. There is a reason why the ratings for your wall cabling is given in amps/volts and not the resistance of the load plugged into the outlet. If you know all of the ratings for every section of cable, and you are not exceeding or close to exceeding any of them, there is no reason to believe there will be any issue whatsoever. That's why the ratings are there.

    Jebus314 on
    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • ToxTox I kill threads Punch DimensionRegistered User regular
    Whether or not to just do a drop is irrelevant.

    The OP has stated they're in an apartment, and aren't allowed to modify the wiring like that.

    A drop is out.

    But the point about the risk of using an extension cord is still a valid one.

    They do make industrial grade extension cords, that are designed for long term use, however. Find a hardware store, get one, and maybe do some research into what grade you'll want.

    Of course, you can always do an external drop. Basically use the grade of wiring you'd use if you were making a drop, and cut the ends and make an extension cord out of that. It's still not as a good as a full drop, but it's probably better than just running a run-of-the-mill extension cord.

    BattleTech KS Thread! | Mech Trade List | Twitter! | Dilige, et quod vis fac
    bowen
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    Short version: Commercial buildings have a heavier gauge wireing running to outlets than residential wiring.

    Long version: Most wiring to your home or apartment outlets is going to be 12 gauge (14 or 16 gauge for lights) if built recently, it may be smaller if it was built cheaply or an older building may use 14 gauge or 16 gauge wire for outlets, and connected to a 40 amp breaker. A 20 amp circuit at 12 gauge wiring can go 50 feet (there and back hense circuit) before NEC requires you go 10 gauge. In a house you are going to be looking at a 20 foot conduit run to the box (40 foot circuit), and 4 foot of coord length (8 foot circuit), so unless you are using a 1 foot extension coord, or the panel is in the room you are going to be outside of code. A commercial building like the one I'm currently in has 6 gauge and 8 gauge electrical wire connected to a 240 amp breaker. So I can run a space heater from an extension coord for years with seamingly little effect because the resistance is going to be much lower than an apartment or house, it's still not a good idea though.

    Why does this matter? Distance increases resistance, and electrical resistance causes heat.

    Your extension cord will have 0 effect on the heat generated by the wiring in your walls. The only thing that will effect the heat generated by the wires in your walls are the amps you are pulling and the voltage used. You should be able to find out what the maximum amperage rating your outlets/buiilding wiring is set up for. It probably isn't the same number as the breaker amperage, but there must be a way to determine that number. After that you only have to worry about not going over the amperage rating for your particular extension cord. This should be written either on the cord or on the little not thingy buy the plug. As long as you are not exceeding or right at either of those numbers you are fine.
    Do not listen to this person. Adding 20 feet to a circuit increases the resistance of the entire circuit.

    Look, heat generated is not passed between an extension cord and the cabling in your wall. Think about an electrical oven. It is basically just wiring. All the way from your breaker into your oven. The wires in your oven have certain resistances and get very hot. The wires in your wall have certain resistances and do not get hot. There is no heat transfer between them. Increasing the resistance of the circuit does NOT mean you are increasing the heat generated at every point in the circuit, unless there is facile heat transfer everywhere.

    edit- also wiring has ratings for a reason. There is a reason why the ratings for your wall cabling is given in amps/volts and not the resistance of the load plugged into the outlet. If you know all of the ratings for every section of cable, and you are not exceeding or close to exceeding any of them, there is no reason to believe there will be any issue whatsoever. That's why the ratings are there.
    Wire has a rating based on the nec which has a rating over distance. You just don't know what you are talking about. Simply put you are not recommending a safe practice 0 electricians will suggest what you are saying. Every one of them will agree with me.

  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    edited May 2013
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    Short version: Commercial buildings have a heavier gauge wireing running to outlets than residential wiring.

    Long version: Most wiring to your home or apartment outlets is going to be 12 gauge (14 or 16 gauge for lights) if built recently, it may be smaller if it was built cheaply or an older building may use 14 gauge or 16 gauge wire for outlets, and connected to a 40 amp breaker. A 20 amp circuit at 12 gauge wiring can go 50 feet (there and back hense circuit) before NEC requires you go 10 gauge. In a house you are going to be looking at a 20 foot conduit run to the box (40 foot circuit), and 4 foot of coord length (8 foot circuit), so unless you are using a 1 foot extension coord, or the panel is in the room you are going to be outside of code. A commercial building like the one I'm currently in has 6 gauge and 8 gauge electrical wire connected to a 240 amp breaker. So I can run a space heater from an extension coord for years with seamingly little effect because the resistance is going to be much lower than an apartment or house, it's still not a good idea though.

    Why does this matter? Distance increases resistance, and electrical resistance causes heat.

    Your extension cord will have 0 effect on the heat generated by the wiring in your walls. The only thing that will effect the heat generated by the wires in your walls are the amps you are pulling and the voltage used. You should be able to find out what the maximum amperage rating your outlets/buiilding wiring is set up for. It probably isn't the same number as the breaker amperage, but there must be a way to determine that number. After that you only have to worry about not going over the amperage rating for your particular extension cord. This should be written either on the cord or on the little not thingy buy the plug. As long as you are not exceeding or right at either of those numbers you are fine.
    Do not listen to this person. Adding 20 feet to a circuit increases the resistance of the entire circuit.

    Look, heat generated is not passed between an extension cord and the cabling in your wall. Think about an electrical oven. It is basically just wiring. All the way from your breaker into your oven. The wires in your oven have certain resistances and get very hot. The wires in your wall have certain resistances and do not get hot. There is no heat transfer between them. Increasing the resistance of the circuit does NOT mean you are increasing the heat generated at every point in the circuit, unless there is facile heat transfer everywhere.

    edit- also wiring has ratings for a reason. There is a reason why the ratings for your wall cabling is given in amps/volts and not the resistance of the load plugged into the outlet. If you know all of the ratings for every section of cable, and you are not exceeding or close to exceeding any of them, there is no reason to believe there will be any issue whatsoever. That's why the ratings are there.
    Wire has a rating based on the nec which has a rating over distance. You just don't know what you are talking about. Simply put you are not recommending a safe practice 0 electricians will suggest what you are saying. Every one of them will agree with me.

    Your right in that a single wire, of a set gauge, has a amperage rating for a given distance. The wire in your wall is a single wire, and the wire in the extension cord is a separate wire. Thus two ratings. There is no section of the NEC code that says anything about what you can plug in to a receptacle based on the gauge of the wall wiring. The only thing it says is what amperage you can draw. That amperage has 0 to do with an extension cable. You are wrong here.

    edit - I should say though that the NEC does recommend that you only ever use extension cords as a temporary solution and not as permanent wiring. The junctions for extension cords are less secure and extension cords in general are more prone to wear and tear.

    Jebus314 on
    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    Short version: Commercial buildings have a heavier gauge wireing running to outlets than residential wiring.

    Long version: Most wiring to your home or apartment outlets is going to be 12 gauge (14 or 16 gauge for lights) if built recently, it may be smaller if it was built cheaply or an older building may use 14 gauge or 16 gauge wire for outlets, and connected to a 40 amp breaker. A 20 amp circuit at 12 gauge wiring can go 50 feet (there and back hense circuit) before NEC requires you go 10 gauge. In a house you are going to be looking at a 20 foot conduit run to the box (40 foot circuit), and 4 foot of coord length (8 foot circuit), so unless you are using a 1 foot extension coord, or the panel is in the room you are going to be outside of code. A commercial building like the one I'm currently in has 6 gauge and 8 gauge electrical wire connected to a 240 amp breaker. So I can run a space heater from an extension coord for years with seamingly little effect because the resistance is going to be much lower than an apartment or house, it's still not a good idea though.

    Why does this matter? Distance increases resistance, and electrical resistance causes heat.

    Your extension cord will have 0 effect on the heat generated by the wiring in your walls. The only thing that will effect the heat generated by the wires in your walls are the amps you are pulling and the voltage used. You should be able to find out what the maximum amperage rating your outlets/buiilding wiring is set up for. It probably isn't the same number as the breaker amperage, but there must be a way to determine that number. After that you only have to worry about not going over the amperage rating for your particular extension cord. This should be written either on the cord or on the little not thingy buy the plug. As long as you are not exceeding or right at either of those numbers you are fine.
    Do not listen to this person. Adding 20 feet to a circuit increases the resistance of the entire circuit.

    Look, heat generated is not passed between an extension cord and the cabling in your wall. Think about an electrical oven. It is basically just wiring. All the way from your breaker into your oven. The wires in your oven have certain resistances and get very hot. The wires in your wall have certain resistances and do not get hot. There is no heat transfer between them. Increasing the resistance of the circuit does NOT mean you are increasing the heat generated at every point in the circuit, unless there is facile heat transfer everywhere.

    edit- also wiring has ratings for a reason. There is a reason why the ratings for your wall cabling is given in amps/volts and not the resistance of the load plugged into the outlet. If you know all of the ratings for every section of cable, and you are not exceeding or close to exceeding any of them, there is no reason to believe there will be any issue whatsoever. That's why the ratings are there.
    Wire has a rating based on the nec which has a rating over distance. You just don't know what you are talking about. Simply put you are not recommending a safe practice 0 electricians will suggest what you are saying. Every one of them will agree with me.

    Your right in that a single wire, of a set gauge, has a amperage rating for a given distance. The wire in your wall is a single wire, and the wire in the extension cord is a separate wire. Thus two ratings. There is no section of the NEC code that says anything about what you can plug in to a receptacle based on the gauge of the wall wiring. The only thing it says is what amperage you can draw. That amperage has 0 to do with an extension cable. You are wrong here.

    Plugging into a wall extends the circuit. It is 3 wires in the extension coord a hot a neutral and a ground you are extending those. That is all. Nec tells you not to use extension cords period. Here is a handy guide on what increases wire resistance.

    http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/u9l3b.cfm

  • Jebus314Jebus314 Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    zepherin wrote: »
    Jebus314 wrote: »
    Don't almost all wires have ratings on them? Using an extension cord over it's rating is dangerous for almost any amount of time. Using an extension cord under it's rating won't ever be an issue. There are 20 amp heaters at my work running on extension cords, and have been for 10 years or something. Just be sure it's rated properly and your fine.

    Short version: Commercial buildings have a heavier gauge wireing running to outlets than residential wiring.

    Long version: Most wiring to your home or apartment outlets is going to be 12 gauge (14 or 16 gauge for lights) if built recently, it may be smaller if it was built cheaply or an older building may use 14 gauge or 16 gauge wire for outlets, and connected to a 40 amp breaker. A 20 amp circuit at 12 gauge wiring can go 50 feet (there and back hense circuit) before NEC requires you go 10 gauge. In a house you are going to be looking at a 20 foot conduit run to the box (40 foot circuit), and 4 foot of coord length (8 foot circuit), so unless you are using a 1 foot extension coord, or the panel is in the room you are going to be outside of code. A commercial building like the one I'm currently in has 6 gauge and 8 gauge electrical wire connected to a 240 amp breaker. So I can run a space heater from an extension coord for years with seamingly little effect because the resistance is going to be much lower than an apartment or house, it's still not a good idea though.

    Why does this matter? Distance increases resistance, and electrical resistance causes heat.

    Your extension cord will have 0 effect on the heat generated by the wiring in your walls. The only thing that will effect the heat generated by the wires in your walls are the amps you are pulling and the voltage used. You should be able to find out what the maximum amperage rating your outlets/buiilding wiring is set up for. It probably isn't the same number as the breaker amperage, but there must be a way to determine that number. After that you only have to worry about not going over the amperage rating for your particular extension cord. This should be written either on the cord or on the little not thingy buy the plug. As long as you are not exceeding or right at either of those numbers you are fine.
    Do not listen to this person. Adding 20 feet to a circuit increases the resistance of the entire circuit.

    Look, heat generated is not passed between an extension cord and the cabling in your wall. Think about an electrical oven. It is basically just wiring. All the way from your breaker into your oven. The wires in your oven have certain resistances and get very hot. The wires in your wall have certain resistances and do not get hot. There is no heat transfer between them. Increasing the resistance of the circuit does NOT mean you are increasing the heat generated at every point in the circuit, unless there is facile heat transfer everywhere.

    edit- also wiring has ratings for a reason. There is a reason why the ratings for your wall cabling is given in amps/volts and not the resistance of the load plugged into the outlet. If you know all of the ratings for every section of cable, and you are not exceeding or close to exceeding any of them, there is no reason to believe there will be any issue whatsoever. That's why the ratings are there.
    Wire has a rating based on the nec which has a rating over distance. You just don't know what you are talking about. Simply put you are not recommending a safe practice 0 electricians will suggest what you are saying. Every one of them will agree with me.

    Your right in that a single wire, of a set gauge, has a amperage rating for a given distance. The wire in your wall is a single wire, and the wire in the extension cord is a separate wire. Thus two ratings. There is no section of the NEC code that says anything about what you can plug in to a receptacle based on the gauge of the wall wiring. The only thing it says is what amperage you can draw. That amperage has 0 to do with an extension cable. You are wrong here.

    Plugging into a wall extends the circuit. It is 3 wires in the extension coord a hot a neutral and a ground you are extending those. That is all. Nec tells you not to use extension cords period. Here is a handy guide on what increases wire resistance.

    http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/u9l3b.cfm

    What is your point? Obviously the resistance of your load will change when using an extension cord. The point is that has nothing to do with the safety ratings. The safety rating of the wiring in your wall, and your electrical outlet, is in amps. Similarly the safety rating of an extension cord that you buy is in amps. As long as the amps you are using for your circuit does not go above either of these ratings you are operating safely. For residential buildings a safe bet is that a single plug is safely rated for 12A of current. If you buy an extension cord that is rated for 15A of current, and you only draw 10A you are fine.

    You are right though that everyone says it's not a good idea to use extension cords as permanent wiring.

    "The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it" - Dr Horrible
  • vhannroyvhannroy Registered User regular
    Well I went in to this looking for information on where to put my setup and wound up with some pretty cool information on electrical wiring. That being said I have mounted the monitors and here are some pictures!
    GACkLOR.jpg
    hmm9xev.jpg

    As you can tell I went with by the door for a few reasons. First and foremost that I did not want my back to the door. Secondly I would have to have used a extension cord or moved an outlet to meet criteria one. I am however going to be talking to the owner to see about getting and outlet put in/ moved to outside the closet where I have the setup.

    Thank you everyone for all the advise you gave!

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